Guillaume Duclaux

Guillaume Duclaux
Université Côte d'Azur · Département Sciences de la Terre

Doctor of Philosophy
Faculty

About

90
Publications
27,671
Reads
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876
Citations
Introduction
I study tectonic processes in a variety of settings using both field geology and computational methods (computational tectonics and surface processes modelling). My research interests are divided between the secular evolution of tectonic processes and mineral systems, the development of 3D structures in the continental lithosphere, and surface response to deformation in active tectonic settings.
Additional affiliations
September 2017 - February 2020
Université Côte d'Azur
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • Faculty member
November 2014 - August 2017
University of Bergen
Position
  • Research Associate
September 2014 - September 2014
The University of Sydney
Position
  • Invited lecturer
Description
  • GEOS3104 - tectonic geomorphology
Education
September 2000 - July 2003
Ecole normale supérieure de Lyon
Field of study
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences
September 1998 - July 2000
Claude Bernard University Lyon 1
Field of study
  • Earth Sciences

Publications

Publications (90)
Article
Full-text available
The juxtaposition of domains of shortening and extension at different scales in orogens has fueled many debates about driving forces and tectonic interpretations, including timing of deformation. At the orogen scale, gravitational collapse and mass transfer from orogenic plateaux to forelands explain some of these juxtapositions. At a regional scal...
Article
Full-text available
Low-angle normal faults (LANFs) accommodate extension during late-stage rifting and breakup, but what is more difficult to explain is the existence of LANFs in less-stretched continental rifts. A critical example is the <5 Ma Corinth Rift, central Greece, where microseismicity, the geometry of exposed fault planes, and deep seismically imaged fault...
Article
Full-text available
Continental rifting precedes the breakup of continents, leading to the formation of passive margins and oceanic lithosphere. Although rifting dynamics is classically described in terms of either active rifting caused by active mantle upwelling, or passive rifting caused by far-field extensional stresses, it was proposed that a transition from passi...
Article
Full-text available
Progressive integration of drainage networks during active crustal extension is observed in continental areas around the globe. This phenomenon is often explained in terms of headward erosion, controlled by the distance to an external base‐level (e.g. the coast). However, conclusive field evidence for the mechanism(s) driving integration is commonl...
Article
Full-text available
Occurrence of multiple faults populations with contrasting orientations in oblique continental rifts and passive margins has long sparked debate about relative timing of deformation events and tectonic interpretations. Here, we use high-resolution three-dimensional thermo-mechanical numerical modeling to characterize the evolution of the structural...
Article
Full-text available
Long-term landscape evolution is controlled by tectonic and climatic forcing acting through surface processes. Rivers are the main drivers of continental denudation because they set the base level of most hillslopes. The mechanisms of fluvial incision are thus a key focus in geomorphological research and require accurate representation and models....
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the impact of tectonics on surface processes and the resultant stratigraphic evolution in multi-phase rifts is challenging, as patterns of erosion and deposition related to older phases of extension are overprinted by the subsequent extensional phases. In this study, we use a one-way coupled numerical modelling approach between a tect...
Preprint
Full-text available
Long-term landscape evolution is controlled by tectonic and climatic forcing acting through surfaces processes. Rivers are the main drivers of continental denudation because they set the base level of most hillslopes and the mechanisms of fluvial incision are a key focus in geomorphological research and require accurate representation and models. R...
Preprint
At divergent plate boundaries, extensional tectonics lead to subsidence, continental rifting and the formation of continental margins. Yet, within this extensional context, transient compressional structures (stress inversion) and phases of uplift (depth inversion) are frequently recorded with no corresponding change in plate motion. Changes in gra...
Preprint
Understanding the impact of tectonics on surface processes and the resultant stratigraphic evolution in multi-phase rifts is challenging, as patterns of erosion and deposition related to older phases of extension are overprinted by the subsequent extensional phases. In this study, we use a one-way coupled numerical modelling approach between a tect...
Article
Full-text available
Transform margins represent ∼ 30 % of non-convergent margins worldwide. Their formation and evolution have traditionally been addressed through kinematic models that do not account for the mechanical behaviour of the lithosphere. In this study, we use high-resolution 3D numerical thermo-mechanical modelling to simulate and investigate the evolution...
Preprint
Full-text available
Transform margins represent ~30 % of the non-convergent margins worldwide. Their formation and evolution have long been addressed through kinematic models that do not account for the mechanical behaviour of the lithosphere. In this study, we use high resolution 3D numerical thermo-mechanical modelling to simulate and investigate the evolution of th...
Article
Full-text available
We report apatite fission-track and ¹⁰ Be terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) dating of 14 moraine boulders originating from inland Terre Adélie, East Antarctica. These data show cooling of the Proterozoic Terre Adélie craton at < ~120°C between 350 and 300 Ma, suggesting > 4 km temperate glacial erosion during the Late Palaeozoic Ice Age, followe...
Article
Full-text available
//// Free access to the paper for 50 days starting from 06.01.2020 https://authors.elsevier.com/c/1aMKQ,UYEnRqH3 //// The Terre Adélie Craton displays superimposed strain fields related to the Neoarchean (2.6-2.4 Ga, M1) and Paleo-Mesoproterozoic (1.7-1.5 Ga, M2) metamorphic events. M1 is a regional granulite facies event, constrained by P-T model...
Article
Full-text available
Comparing nearby areas with contrasted seismicity distributions like the French Variscan Armorican Massif (AM) and the surrounding intracratonic Paris Basin (PB) can help deciphering which parameters control the occurrence or absence of diffuse, intraplate seismicity. In this paper, we examine how lithosphere temperature, fluid pressure, and fricti...
Preprint
Occurrence of multiple faults populations with contrasting orientations in oblique continental rifts and passive margins has long sparked debate about relative timing of deformation events and tectonic interpretations. Here, we use high-resolution three-dimensional thermo-mechanical numerical modeling to characterize the evolution of the structural...
Article
Full-text available
Geomorphic strain markers accumulating the effects of many earthquake cycles help to constrain the mechanical behaviour of continental rift systems as well as the related seismic hazards. In the Corinth Rift (Greece), the unique record of onshore and offshore markers of Pleistocene ~100-ka climate cycles provides an outstanding possibility to const...
Article
Full-text available
Landscapes in actively developing rifts respond to tectonic forcing over a similar time scale to that of fault array evolution (i.e., 10 5-10 6 yr). Consequently transient landscapes (i.e., not in topographic steady state) predominate, characterized by focused incision along extensional fault scarps and regional tectonic tilting of surface slopes a...
Article
Full-text available
The erosion history of Antarctica is fundamental to our understanding of interlinks between climate and glacier dynamics. However, because of the vast polar ice sheet covering more than 99% of Antarctica land mass, the continental surface response to glacial erosion remains largely unknown. Over the last decade the subglacial topography of Antarcti...
Article
The 1000 km-long suture zone of the Dahomeyide belt, exposed from Southeast Ghana to South Mali, corresponds to a narrow and lithologically diverse area with symptomatic coronitic HP granulitic massifs. Based on a review of published petrological, geochemical and geochronological data along the Dahomeyide belt we propose a global scenario for the c...
Article
Full-text available
The role of spatiotemporally varying tectonic forcing in the development of stratigraphic patterns along passive margins and continental rift basins has been recognised for decades, but the exact nature of the stratigraphic response is still debated. This study develops a coupled tectonic-stratigraphic numerical model with a fixed absolute lake lev...
Poster
Full-text available
We investigate landscape development and basin stratigraphy for the Corinth rift, central Greece, over the past 130 kyrs using surface processes modeling1. The Corinth rift, active since the late Pliocene, is one of the most rapidly extending continental rifts on Earth. Progressive growth and linkage of predominantly north-dipping faults has result...
Preprint
Geomorphic strain markers accumulating the effects of many earthquake cycles help to constrain the mechanical behaviour of continental rift systems as well as related seismic hazard. In the Corinth Rift (Greece), the remarkably rich record of onshore and offshore markers of Pleistocene 100ky climate cycles is unique worldwide and makes it a key sit...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Deformation occurs on a wide range of scales in the Earth's lithosphere. On the largest scale, oblique deformation where slip vectors are not precisely orthogonal to plate boundaries is an inevitable consequence of relative plate motion on a spherical surface. In tectonic environments where oblique extension dominates three-dimensional deformation...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Nowadays, forward numerical modelling is widely used in the geoscience community to investigate tectonic or surface processes in two and three dimensions. These codes implement non-linear physical laws to solve for temperature , velocity , pressure, or landscape dynamics. Of course, all of these physical laws require a complete set of input paramet...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Corinth Rift is one of the most actively extending basins on Earth, with modern-day GPS extension rates of up to 15 mm/yr. The structure of the onshore and offshore parts of the rift has been intensely studied, however controversy remains as to the geometry of faults at depth. The rift has long been described as experiencing low-angle (< 30 •)...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
How and why do continents break? More than two decades of analogue and 2D plane-strain numerical experiments have shown that despite the origin of the forces driving extension, the geometry of continental rifts falls into three categories-or modes: narrow rift, wide rift, or core complex. The mode of extension itself is strongly influenced by the r...
Article
Full-text available
Within upstream reaches of incised valleys, fluvial sedimentation occurs where it is controlled by interaction between climate and tectonics. This study focuses on a Plio-Pleistocene fluvial paleovalley, which drained the northeastern margin of Siena basin (northern Apennines, Italy). Valley filling resulted from the interaction between river drain...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The relative movement between two divergent rigid plates on a sphere can be described using a Euler pole and an angular velocity. On Earth, this typically results in extensional velocities increasing linearly as a function of the distance from the pole (for example in the South Atlantic, North Atlantic, Woodlark Basin, Red Sea Basin, etc.). This pr...
Article
Full-text available
We present a new numerical approach for simulating geomorphic and stratigraphic processes that combines open-channel flow with non-uniform sediment transport law, and semi-empirical diffusive mass wasting. It is designed to facilitate modelling of surface processes across multiple space- and time-scales, and under a variety of environmental and tec...
Article
Full-text available
Since 2009 all underground face samples and diamond-drill core samples at the Plutonic Gold Mine (Plutonic), Marymia Inlier, Western Australia have been analysed by portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) following a systematic approach. This method is rapid and cost-effective and provides analyses of a large suite of chemical elements which can be used...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
More than 50 high-grade lode samples from across Plutonic Gold Mine (Plutonic), Marymia Inlier, Western Australia (Figure 1), were analysed by a variety of techniques, including micro X-ray fluorescence mapping (micro-XRF), micro X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission gun (FEG) SEM, electron back-sc...
Article
Full-text available
The El Oro metamorphic province of SW Ecuador is a composite massif made of juxtaposed terranes of both continental and oceanic affinity that has been located in a forearc position since Late Paleozoic times. Various geochemical, geochronological and metamorphic studies have been undertaken on the El Oro metamorphic province, providing an understan...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Understanding the controls on Au mineralisation requires a multi-scale approach whereby data from all scales (regional to nano) are considered together to form a comprehensive mineral system model. Advances in microcharacterisation techniques, such as micro X-ray fluorescence (µXRF) mapping, micro-X-ray computed tomography (µCT), scanning electron...
Article
Full-text available
The amphibolite-facies, Au-mineralized mafic rocks at the Plutonic Gold Mine are intruded by a suite of dolerite dykes of unknown age. The zones between these intrusive units often host significant Au mineralization. It is unclear whether this enrichment in Au mineralization is a function of the intrusion of the dolerites themselves or the influenc...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Sedimentary basins capture Earth’s sea level, climate history, and the variation of the surface topography due to geodynamic, tectonic, and surface processes. They host a range of conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon resources of critical importance for the continued functioning of modern society. The key to moving exploration into deeper ba...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Passive margins and rift basins supply the major fraction of global hydrocarbon resources. While our society is massively reliant on them, reserves are waning and new discoveries in conventional sedimentary systems remain limited forcing exploration into deeper and more remote territories. In order to secure new resources in frontier basins, it is...
Article
Full-text available
Portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) technology can be used to collect large amounts of multi-element data rapidly at relatively low cost and has been widely embraced within the minerals industry. However, to date, it has been difficult to compare data-sets collected by different users or at different times because there is no standardized approach t...
Article
Geological logging by mine and exploration geologists involves the application of a classification code that requires a geologist to make a subjective decision to classify a particular rock unit (e.g. rock type, alteration intensity, mineralisation content). Where multiple geologists carry out logging this approach will most likely result in incons...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The question of what processes controlled the tectonic evolution of Earth’s crust, during the Archaean, is much debated. Our study in the Neoarchaean Yilgarn Craton in Western Australia aims at understanding if gneiss domes and contemporaneous basins formed by local diapirism with partial convective overturn, far field tectonic processes, or a comb...
Conference Paper
The Miocene geography of Central Otago, New Zealand was dominated by a long-lived region of subsidence culminating in an orogen-scale large lake complex that existed for at least 10 Ma. Subsidence was terminated by uplift of orogen-perpendicular ranges with orogen-parallel subsidiary ranges infilling of the lake and coincident major drainage reorie...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Characterisation of hydrothermal gold systems across multiple scales is increasingly important for our understanding of ore deposit genesis and for targeting new mineralisation. Published work on multiscale mineral system exploration focuses either on applying a single technique across scales or on incorporating a series of techniques across a limi...
Conference Paper
Geological logging by mine and exploration geologists involves the application of a logging code that requires a geologist to make a subjective decision to classify a particular rock unit. This will most likely result in inconsistencies in logging that will be difficult to monitor or assess over time. A potential solution to this problem is to have...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In a continental environment, sediment mobilisation, dispersion and deposition are mainly controlled by mass gravity and streamflow processes. Alluvial sedimentary systems have an important economic value because of their capacity to host mineral resources. In the Hamersley Province, alluvial iron deposits (including the well-known detrital iron de...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Interlinks between deformation and sedimentation have long been recognised as an important factor in the evolution of continental rifts and basins development. However, determining the relative impact of tectonic and climatic forcing on the dynamics of these systems remains a major challenge. This problem in part derives from a lack of modelling to...
Article
Full-text available
In the forearc of the Andean active margin in southwest Ecuador, the El Oro metamorphic complex exhibits a well exposed tilted forearc section partially migmatized. We used Raman spectroscopy on carbonaceous matter (RSCM) thermometry and pseudosections coupled with mineralogical and textural studies to constrain the pressure-temperature (P-T) evolu...
Article
Full-text available
GeoSciML version 3.0 (http://www.geosciml.org), released in late 2011, is the latest version of the CGI-IUGS* Interoperability Working Group geoscience data interchange standard. The new version is a significant upgrade and refactoring of GeoSciML v2 which was released in 2008. GeoSciML v3 has already been adopted by several major international in...