Guillaume Dezecache

Guillaume Dezecache
Université de Neuchâtel | UniNE · Institut de biologie (IBIOL)

About

60
Publications
9,336
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693
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (60)
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the affective lives of animals has been a long-standing challenge in science. Recent technological progress in infrared thermal imaging has enabled researchers to monitor animals' physiological states in real-time when exposed to ecologically relevant situations, such as feeding in the company of others. During social feeding, an indi...
Article
Full-text available
Audience effects are key in studies of animal social cognition and are typically investigated during directed social interactions. Male chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, regularly perform aggressive displays in the presence of others, often targeting a specific group member, and combine this agonistic behaviour with acoustic signals. Here, we were inte...
Article
Predictions pose unique problems. Experts regularly get them wrong, and collective solutions (such as prediction markets and super-forecaster schemes) do better but remain selective and costly. Contrary to the idea that face-to-face discussion hinders collective intelligence, social deliberation improves the resolution of general knowledge problems...
Article
Full-text available
Background In response to the Covid-19 pandemic, most countries implemented physical distancing measures. Many mental health experts warned that through increasing social isolation and anxiety, these measures could negatively affect psychosocial wellbeing. However, socially aligning with others by adhering to these measures may also be beneficial f...
Article
Human speech is marked by a signal–function decoupling, the capacity to produce sounds that can fulfil a variety of functions, in contrast to nonverbal vocalizations such as laughter, cries and screams, which are functionally more rigid. It has been argued that this decoupling provides an essential foundation for the emergence of language, in both...
Article
The role emotions play in the dynamics of cultural phenomena has long been neglected. The collection of articles recently published in Emotion Review provides an important first step into this necessary endeavor. In this commentary, we discuss this contribution by emphasizing the role epistemological parsimony should play in the future of this rese...
Article
Full-text available
Reactions to danger have been depicted as antisocial but research has shown that supportive behaviors (e.g., helping injured others, giving information or reassuring others) prevail in life-threatening circumstances. Why is it so? Previous accounts have put the emphasis on the role of psychosocial factors, such as the maintenance of social norms or...
Article
Full-text available
With restricted face-to-face interactions, COVID-19 lockdowns and distancing measures tested the capability of computer-mediated communication to foster social contact and wellbeing. In a multinational sample ( n = 6436), we investigated how different modes of contact related to wellbeing during the pandemic. Computer-mediated communication was mor...
Article
Full-text available
How essential is trust in science to prevent the spread of COVID-19? People who trust in science are reportedly more likely to comply with official guidelines, implying that higher levels of adherence could be achieved by improving trust in science. However, analysis of a global dataset (n = 4341) suggests otherwise. Trust in science had a small, i...
Article
Riots are unpredictable and dangerous. Our understanding of the factors that cause riots is based on correlational observations of population data, or post hoc introspection of individuals. To complement these accounts, we developed innovative experimental techniques, investigated the psychological factors of rioting and explored their consequences...
Preprint
Background: In response to the Covid-19 pandemic, most countries implemented physical distancing measures. Many mental health experts warned that through increasing social isolation and anxiety, these measures could negatively affect psychosocial wellbeing. However, socially aligning with others by adhering to these measures may also be beneficial...
Article
Full-text available
Several studies have shown that individuals automatically integrate the actions of other individuals into their own action plans, thus facilitating action coordination. What happens to this mechanism in situations of danger? This capacity could either be reduced, in order to allocate more cognitive resources for individualistic actions, or be maint...
Article
Full-text available
Laughter and smiles are often, but not always, associated with positive affect. These expressions of humans help to promote social relationships as well as the development of cognitive and socio-emotional skills and they may have a positive impact on health and well-being, hereby covering a selection of fitness-relevant benefits. Both laughter and...
Preprint
https://psyarxiv.com/b8vfx/ With restrictions on opportunities for face to face (FtF) interactions, Covid-19 lockdowns test the promises of digitally mediated communication (DMC) to foster social contact and wellbeing. In a multinational sample (n= 6436), we investigated how different modes of contact relate to wellbeing during a global pandemic. D...
Article
Full-text available
Distress calls are an acoustically variable group of vocalizations ubiquitous in mammals and other animals. Their presumed function is to recruit help, but there has been much debate on whether the nature of the disturbance can be inferred from the acoustics of distress calls. We used machine learning to analyse episodes of distress calls of wild i...
Article
Full-text available
Human vocal ontogeny is considered to be a process whereby a large repertoire of discrete sounds seemingly emerges from a smaller number of acoustically graded vocalizations. While adult chimpanzee vocal behavior is highly graded, its developmental trajectory is poorly understood. In the present study, we therefore examined the size and structure o...
Preprint
How essential is trust in science to prevent the spread of COVID-19? Previous work shows that people who trust in science are more likely to comply with official guidelines, which suggests that higher levels of compliance could be achieved by improving trust in science. However, analysis of a global dataset (n=4341) suggests otherwise. Trust in sci...
Article
Full-text available
Why do we adopt new rules, such as social distancing? Although human sciences research stresses the key role of social influence in behaviour change, most COVID‐19 campaigns emphasize the disease’s medical threat. In a global data set (n = 6,674), we investigated how social influences predict people’s adherence to distancing rules during the pandem...
Article
How did human language evolve from earlier forms of communication? One way to address this question is to compare prelinguistic human vocal behavior with nonhuman primate calls. An important finding has been that, prior to speech and from early on, human infant vocal behavior exhibits functional flexibility, or the capacity to produce sounds that a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Why do we adopt new rules, such as social distancing? While decades of psychology research stresses the importance of social influence on individual behaviour, many COVID-19 campaigns focused on convincing individuals that distancing is the right thing to do. In a global dataset (114 countries, n=6674), we investigated how social influences predict...
Article
Full-text available
Progress in understanding the emergence of pathological anxiety depends on the availability of paradigms effective in inducing anxiety in a simple, consistent and sustained manner. The Threat-of-Shock paradigm has typically been used to elicit anxiety, but poses ethical issues when testing vulnerable populations. Moreover, it is not clear from past...
Preprint
If collective reactions to danger have long been portrayed as antisocial and self-preservative, research has shown that prosociality is maintained and sometimes fostered in life-threatening circumstances. In this research, we interviewed 32 survivors of the attacks at ‘Le Bataclan’ (on the evening of 13-11-2015 in Paris, France) with the aims of of...
Article
Dezecache et al. argue that affiliation and contact-seeking are key responses to danger. These natural social tendencies are likely to hinder the observance of physical distancing during the current pandemic. We need internet access at this time, not only to promote freedom of expression, but also to promote public health.
Preprint
Full-text available
How did human language evolve from earlier forms of communication? One way to address this question is to compare prelinguistic human vocal behavior with nonhuman primate calls. Here, an important finding has been that, prior to speech, human infant vocal behavior exhibits functional flexibility, the capacity of producing protophones that are not t...
Preprint
Full-text available
Distress calls are an acoustically variable group of vocalizations ubiquitous in mammals and other animals. Their presumed function is to recruit help, but it is uncertain whether this is mediated by listeners extracting the nature of the disturbance from calls. To address this, we used machine learning to analyse distress calls produced by wild in...
Article
Full-text available
Facial mimicry is a central feature of human social interactions. Although it has been evidenced in other mammals, no study has yet shown that this phenomenon can reach the level of precision seem in humans and gorillas. Here, we studied the facial complexity of group-housed sun bears, a typically solitary species, with special focus on testing for...
Article
Several recent theories postulate communicative functions for cognitive mechanisms previously thought to have individualistic functions—in particular, reasoning and metacognition. These theories join older theories suggesting that many of our behaviors have communicative functions, for instance to communicate emotions or to influence how people per...
Article
Full-text available
Individual reactions to danger in humans are often characterized as antisocial and self-preservative. Yet, more than 50 years of research have showed that humans often seek social partners and behave pro-socially when confronted by danger. This research has relied on post hoc verbal reports, which fall short of capturing the more spontaneous reacti...
Chapter
Emotional signals influence others' behavior. They trigger a host of responses in the observer. Perception of emotional signals incorporates not only the appraisal of the emotional content of the signal but also the preparation of an adaptive reaction to it. This interplay between two processes is reflected in the limbic–motor interactions in the h...
Article
The contagion model of emotional propagation has almost become a dogma in cognitive science. We turn here to the evolutionary approach to communicative interactions to probe the limits of the contagion model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Article
A common assumption regarding mass emergency situations is that individuals in such contexts behave in a way that maximizes their likelihood to escape, at the expense, or with little concern for, the welfare and survival of their neighbors. Doing so, they might even compromise the effectiveness of group evacuation. This conception follows the views...
Article
It is expected that natural selection has endowed our auditory apparatus with the ability to adaptively prioritize information that is crucial for survival and reproduction, such as vocal emotional signals emitted by our conspecifics, even in a noisy and dynamic natural environment (signals progressively emerge or fade away in noise as conspecifics...
Article
The study of pragmatics is typically concerned with ostensive communication (especially through language), in which we not only provide evidence for our intended speaker meaning, but also make manifest our intention to do so. This is not, however, the only way in which humans communicate. We also communicate in many non-ostensive ways, and these ex...
Article
Research in social cognition has mainly focused on the detection and comprehension of others' mental and emotional states. Doing so, past studies have adopted a "contemplative" view of the role of the observer engaged in a social interaction. However, the adaptive problem posed by the social environment is first and foremost that of coordination, w...
Article
Full-text available
We question the idea that the mirror neuron system is the substrate of social affordances perception, and we suggest that most of the activity seen in the parietal and premotor cortex of the human brain is independent of mirroring activity as characterized in macaques, but rather reflects a process of one's own action specification in response to s...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the spread of emotions beyond dyads. Yet, it is of importance for explaining the emergence of crowd behaviors. Here, we experimentally addressed whether emotional homogeneity within a crowd might result from a cascade of local emotional transmissions where the perception of another's emotional expression produces, in the obser...
Article
Full-text available
What processes or mechanisms mediate interpersonal matching of facial expressions remains a debated issue. As theoretical approaches to underlying processes (i.e., automatic motor mimicry, communicative intent, and emotional appraisal) make different predictions about whether facial responses to others' facial expressions are influenced by perceive...
Article
Full-text available
People display facial reactions when exposed to others' emotional expressions, but exactly what mechanism mediates these facial reactions remains a debated issue. In this study, we manipulated two critical perceptual features that contribute to determining the significance of others' emotional expressions: the direction of attention (toward or away...
Data
Mean (SEM) intensity ratings of feelings (DOC)
Data
Mean (SEM) recognition rate. (DOC)
Data
Mean activity (SEM) between 300 and 700 ms for the Corrugator muscle region submitted to a repeated measures ANOVA with within-subject factors of Target of Attention (Self or Other) and Level of Emotion (1, 2, 3, 4). (DOC)
Data
Mean (SEM) data from the zygomatic activity submitted to a repeated measures ANOVA using Target of Attention (Self or Other), Level of Emotion (1, 2, 3, 4) and Time Windows (10) as within-subject factors. (DOC)
Data
Mean (SEM) data from the Corrugator activity submitted to a repeated measures ANOVA using Target of Attention (Self or Other), Level of Emotion (1, 2, 3, 4) and Time Windows (10) as within-subject factors. (DOC)
Article
Recent studies suggest that laughter plays an important role in social bonding. Human communities are much larger than those of other primates and hence require more time to be devoted to social maintenance activities. Yet, there is an upper limit on the amount of time that can be dedicated to social demands, and, in nonhuman primates, this sets an...
Article
Full-text available
Communicative intentions are transmitted by many perceptual cues, including gaze direction, body gesture, and facial expressions. However, little is known about how these visual social cues are integrated over time in the brain and, notably, whether this binding occurs in the emotional or the motor system. By coupling magnetic resonance and electro...
Article
L’essai d'Albino Lanciani s'intitule « phénoménologie et sciences cognitives » mais l’on se serait satisfait d’un tout autre titre : « phénoménologie versus sciences cognitives », ou peut-être même plus légitimement, « Albino Lanciani contre les sciences cognitives ». Il ne s’agit en effet pas là d’une simple revue des points de désaccord entre app...

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