Guido L. B. Wiesenberg

Guido L. B. Wiesenberg
University of Zurich | UZH · Institut für Geographie

PD Dr. rer. nat. Dipl-Geol.

About

118
Publications
24,098
Reads
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Introduction
The main aim of my research is to understand carbon dynamics in various ecosystems at a molecular level, especially lipidic compounds. Furthermore, the effects of climate itself and climate change as well as other environmental factors like nitrogen deposition and the associated effects on carbon dynamics in past, recent and future ecosystems are main targets of my research. Overall, I am interested in combining molecular proxies with isotope applications to answer these research questions.
Additional affiliations
May 2012 - present
University of Zurich
Position
  • Senior Researcher and Lecturer
October 2006 - September 2012
Universität Bayreuth
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
October 2000 - September 2006
Universität Köln
Position
  • Research Assistent
Education
May 2013 - November 2013
University of Zurich
Field of study
  • Physical Geography
January 2008 - April 2013
University of Bayreuth
Field of study
  • Geoecology
October 2000 - November 2004
University of Cologne
Field of study
  • Geology

Publications

Publications (118)
Article
Full-text available
To study paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic changes in loess–paleosol sequences (LPS), most proxies except for screening parameters have often been applied at low sampling density, typically 1–2 per stratigraphic unit. This might lead to results that overlook paleovegetation effects that were not only restricted to paleosols but also affected und...
Article
Soils, paleosols and terrestrial sediments serve as archives for studying climate change, and represent important terrestrial carbon pools. Archive functioning relies on the chronological integrity of the respective units. Incorporation of younger organic matter (OM) e.g. by plant roots and associated microorganisms into deep subsoil and underlying...
Preprint
Full-text available
Despite the importance of soil organic matter (SOM) in the global carbon cycle, there remain many open questions regarding its formation and preservation. The study of individual organic compound classes that make up SOM, such as lipid biomarkers including n-alkanes, can provide insight into the cycling of bulk SOM. While studies of lipid biomarker...
Article
Rhizoliths, that is, roots fossilized by secondary carbonates, have been known for ages and are increasingly used for paleoenvironmental reconstructions. However, knowledge about their formation mechanisms remains limited. This study reports the mineralogical and chemical characterization of rhizoliths at different stages of mineralization and foss...
Article
Full-text available
The rapidly collapsing glacial systems of the Alps produced a large number of melt-water lakes and mires after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in the Late Glacial period. The Rhone-Aare-glacier system gave rise to large moorlands and lakes in the region of the Three Lakes Region of Western Switzerland. When moorlands are formed, they are efficient s...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the importance of soil organic matter (SOM) in the global carbon cycle, there remain many open questions regarding its formation and preservation. The study of individual organic compound classes that make up SOM, such as lipid biomarkers including n-alkanes, can provide insight into the cycling of bulk SOM. While studies of lipid biomarker...
Article
Full-text available
Rising temperatures have the potential to directly affect carbon cycling in peatlands by enhancing organic matter (OM) decomposition, contributing to the release of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere. In turn, increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration may stimulate photosynthesis, potentially increasing plant litter inputs belowground and transferring ca...
Article
Full-text available
The microbial community composition in subsoils remains understudied, and it is largely unknown whether subsoil microorganisms show a similar response to global warming as microorganisms at the soil surface do. Since microorganisms are the key drivers of soil organic carbon decomposition, this knowledge gap causes uncertainty in the predictions of...
Article
Full-text available
The increasing atmospheric CO 2 concentration is a consequence of human activities leading to severe environmental deteriorations. Techniques are thus needed to sequester and reduce atmospheric carbon. One of the proposed techniques is the transformation or construction of new soils into which more organic carbon can be sequestered and CO 2 be cons...
Preprint
Full-text available
The microbial community composition in subsoils remains understudied and it is largely unknown whether subsoil microorganisms show a similar response to global warming as do microorganisms at the soil surface. Since microorganisms are key drivers of soil organic carbon decomposition, this knowledge gap causes uncertainty in predictions of future ca...
Article
Full-text available
Microorganisms are key players in organic matter and nutrient cycles of terrestrial ecosystems. The analysis of microbial membrane lipids, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) has strongly improved our understanding of how microbial processes contribute to these cycles. The analysis has proven to yield robust results, but adaptations of analytical para...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing global temperatures have the potential to stimulate decomposition and alter the composition of soil organic matter (SOM). However, questions remain about the extent to which SOM quality and quantity along the soil profile may change under future warming. In this study we assessed how +4˚C whole-soil warming affected the quantity and qual...
Article
Full-text available
Application of compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) in sediment fingerprinting source apportionment studies is becoming more frequent, as it can potentially provide robust land-use-based source attribution of suspended sediments in freshwater and marine systems. Isotopic tracers such as δ13C values of vegetation-derived organic compounds are c...
Article
Das Berner Seeland umfasst die in einem Dreieck zwischen Neuenburger-, Murten- und Bielersee eingebettete Senke am Jurasüdfuss. Noch vor 160 Jahren prägten Überschwemmungen, Armut und Krankheiten (Malaria) das Leben der Bevölkerung. Die erste Juragewässerkorrektion (1868 - 1897) verbesserte die Situation für die lokale Bevölkerung entscheidend und...
Article
Vast areas in the Mediterranean are characterised by evaporite deposits of the Messinian crises (c. 6–5.3 Ma BP). During this period, large deposits were built up in shallow lagoon-like systems and are now found in southern Italy, Albania, Cyprus and Turkey. So far, soil formation on evaporites has been studied predominantly in subarid to arid envi...
Article
Full-text available
Natural floodplains are characterized by a complex habitat mosaic. However, damming, water storage, and hydropower production affect many floodplains by altering their natural habitat diversity. Field sampling data and imaging spectroscopy are used in combination with statistical models to assess resource allocation strategies of willow stands in p...
Article
Full-text available
Application of compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) in sediment fingerprinting source apportionment studies is becoming more frequent, as it can potentially provide robust land-use based source attribution of suspended sediments in a freshwater system. Isotopic tracers such as δ13C values of vegetation-derived organic compounds are considered...
Article
Full-text available
Soil erosion and associated sediment transfer are among the major causes of aquatic ecosystem and surface water quality impairment. Through land use and agricultural practices, human activities modify the soil erosive risk and the catchment connectivity, becoming a key factor of sediment dynamics. Hence, restoration and management plans of water bo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Soil erosion and associated sediment transfer are among the major causes of aquatic ecosystem and surface water quality impairment. Through land-use and agricultural practices, human activities modify the soil erosive risk and the catchment connectivity, becoming a key factor of sediment dynamics. Hence, restoration and management plans of water bo...
Article
This study compares data statistically that were collected from both long-term drained and undrained plots to test hypotheses concerning the effect of drainage on plant community, soil total nitrogen (TN), soil total carbon (TC) and stable isotopic (δ¹⁵N, δ¹³C) contents in a permanent grassland. In addition, the effects of soil depth, topography (e...
Article
Full-text available
The application of lipids in soils as molecular proxies, also often referred to as biomarkers, has dramatically increased in the last decades. Applications range from inferring changes in past vegetation composition, climate, and/or human presence to unraveling the input and turnover of soil organic matter (SOM). The molecules used are extractable...
Article
Drought events are predicted to increase under future climate change. In temperate ecosystems, plants are capable of resisting drought due to their hydrophobic wax layer, in which n-alkanes are important constituents. In soils, plant-derived n-alkanes are comparatively resistant to degradation. To improve understanding of the significance of n-alka...
Article
Temperate ecosystems are susceptible to drought events. The effect of a severe drought (104 days) followed by irrigation on the plant C uptake, its assimilation and input of C in soil were examined using a triple (13)CO2 pulse-chase labelling experiment in model grassland and heathland ecosystems. First (13)CO2 pulse at day 0 of the experiment reve...
Article
As a result of global climate change the incidence of drought conditions in Europe is predicted to increase in the future, which also influences plant resistance. Lipids are important plant constituents that protect plants against drought stress and contribute to the intermediate stable carbon (C) pool in soil. However, the extent to which drought...
Article
Full-text available
The application of lipids in soils as molecular proxies, also often referred to as biomarkers, has dramatically increased in the last decades. Applications range from inferring changes in past vegetation composition, climate and/or human presence to unraveling input and turnover of soil organic matter (SOM). Molecules used include extractable and e...
Article
Full-text available
Soil studies commonly comprise the uppermost meter for tracing, e.g., soil development. However, the maximum rooting depth of various plants significantly exceeds this depth. We hypothesized that deeper parts of the soil, soil parent material and especially paleosols provide beneficial conditions in terms of, e.g., nutrient contents, thus supportin...
Article
Full-text available
Fire-derived, pyrogenic carbon (PyC), sometimes called black carbon (BC), is the carbonaceous solid residue of biomass and fossil fuel combustion, such as char and soot. PyC is ubiquitous in the environment due to its long persistence, and its abundance might even increase with the projected increase in global wildfire activity and the continued bu...
Article
Atmospheric CO2 concentration and nitrogen (N) deposition have been altered by anthropogenic activity and they affect global biogeochemical cycles. It is still not clear how these environmental changes influence the storage and cycling of organic matter (OM) in soils, although this plays a key role in the biogeochemistry of terrestrial ecosystems....
Article
Full-text available
Dust in Greenland ice cores is used to reconstruct the activity of dust emitting regions and atmospheric circulation. However, the source of dust material to Greenland over the last glacial period is the subject of considerable uncertainty. Here we use new clay mineral and <10 µm Sr-Nd isotopic data from a range of Northern Hemisphere loess deposit...
Chapter
Analysis of lipids and hydrocarbons is performed frequently in recent and ancient plant tissues, soils, sediments, peat deposits, oil, rocks, anthropogenic artifacts (archeological samples), and other materials to trace the contribution of different biological and anthropogenic sources of organic matter as well as environmental changes and the fate...
Article
Full-text available
Soil studies commonly comprise the uppermost meter for tracing e.g. soil development. However, the maximum rooting depth of various plants significantly exceeds this depth. We hypothesized that deeper parts of the soil, soil parent material and especially paleosols provide beneficial conditions in terms of e.g. nutrient contents, thus supporting th...
Article
Full-text available
Plants allocate carbon (C) to sink tissues depending on phenological, physiological or environmental factors. We still have little knowledge on C partitioning into various cellular compounds and metabolic pathways at various ecophysiological stages. We used compound-specific stable isotope analysis to investigate C partitioning of freshly assimilat...
Article
Full-text available
Soil and water management is particularly relevant in semi-arid regions to enhance agricultural productivity. During periods of water scarcity soil moisture differences are important indicators of the soil water deficit and are traditionally used for allocating water resources among farmers of a village community. Here we present a simple, inexpens...
Article
Full-text available
Sediments of Lake Baikal and smaller lakes in its surroundings have been frequently used to trace paleoenvironmental changes. However, these sediments integrate environmental proxies over large areas and the processes leading to alteration of terrestrial signals are not fully understood. More specific information can be derived from terrestrial arc...
Article
Oxygen (O2) supply and the related redox potential (EH) are important parameters for interactions between roots and microorganisms in the rhizosphere. Rhizosphere extension in terms of the spatial distribution of O2 concentration and EH is poorly documented under aerobic soil conditions. We investigated how far O2 consumption of roots and microorga...
Article
Full-text available
Molecular characterization of pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) is of great interest to understand the formation and behavior of these increasingly abundant materials in the environment. Two molecular marker methods have often been used to characterize and trace PyOM: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and benzenepolycarboxylic acid (BPCA) analysi...
Article
Aims This study analyzed the extent to which root exu-dates diffuse from the root surface towards the soil depending on topsoil and subsoil properties and the effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal hyphae on root-derived C distribution in the rhizosphere. Methods Alfalfa was grown in three-compartment pots. Nylon gauze prevented either roots alone...
Article
Full-text available
Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and reactive nitrogen (N) concentrations have been increasing due to human activities and impact the global carbon (C) cycle by affecting plant photosynthesis and decomposition processes in soil. Large amounts of C are stored in plants and soils, but the mechanisms behind the stabilization of plant- and microbial-de...
Article
Terrestrial sediments like loess are well known for their paleoenvironmental significance. Although organic carbon contents are commonly very low, loess and organic matter (LOM) thereof is regarded as important terrestrial archive for vegetation and climate during deposition. However, the LOM signal is prone to contamination by OM of other age and...
Article
Full-text available
The aromatic carbon structure is a defining property of chars and is often expressed with the help of two concepts: (i) aromaticity and (ii) degree of aromatic condensation. The varying extent of these two features is assumed to largely determine the relatively high persistence of charred material in the environment and is thus of interest for, e.g...
Article
Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are complex lipids of highmolecular weight, recently discovered in soils and suggested to be produced by still unknown bacteria. The relative distribution of these compounds was shown to depend on environmental parameters, mainly temperature and pH. Over the last years, an increasing number of...