Guadalupe López-Íñiguez

Guadalupe López-Íñiguez
Sibelius Academy · Music Education

PhD MMus

About

49
Publications
7,258
Reads
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301
Citations
Featured research
Article
Full-text available
Making sense of musicians’ professional learning pathways is of crucial importance to understanding their career progressions, their routes into creative employment, and the relevance of various policies to their professional lives. However, this is a far cry from understanding how critical reflection catalyses diverse learning routes, especially when considering evidence originating from postgraduate musicians’ own accounts of their journeys into job creation. In this study, we invited 5 postgraduate classical musicians who were invested in professional learning through performance programmes in higher education to contribute these types of personal perspectives. The paper explores the value of postgraduate musicians’ own accounts of their journeys, and illustrates how a more nuanced understanding of them can be arrived at through the use of visual-based tools, e.g., Rivers of Musical Experience and Dixit Cards. This constructivist intervention prompted both group and individual critical reflections, as well as sense-making processes that enabled the participants to become more informed about the (typically overlooked or neglected) critical incidents that differently catalyse professional learning pathways. All of the participants articulated sociocultural influences that were situated along historical, present, and future points of departure and arrival, helping them to create meaning and understanding of themselves and their (at times unsettling) professional learning pathways. From the ensuing thematic analyses, we identified a commonality of themes across life phases with three key influential groups of people (parents, peers, and professionals) that strongly affected their professional learning pathways and learner identity-construction. The results indicate that the relationships between these phases and people are complex. The research illuminates the previously unexplored connection between the meaning-making trajectories that are instantiated through critical reflection, and adds to our understanding of the development of musicians’ professional learning pathways and learner identities.
Article
Full-text available
In the past 2 years our world has experienced huge disruptions because of COVID-19. The performing arts has not been insulated from these tumultuous events with the entire music industry being thrown into a state of instability due to the paralyzing effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. In this study, we examined how classical professional musicians' ability to cope with uncertainty, economic struggles, and work-life interplay during COVID-19 was influenced by various factors that affect a crucial part of the development and sustainment of music careers: musicians' practice. We analyzed responses to an online survey of 309 classical performing musicians from 41 countries in Europe and Latin America across three pandemic stages: immediately before the pandemic, during the pandemic, and when vaccines were being made available and lockdowns were being reduced or lifted. Structural equation modeling indicates relationships between perceptions of threat at the peak of the pandemic and the musicians Self-or External-Based Motivation for the three periods in which respondents were asked to reflect. Findings suggest that musicians who are more internally self-motivated seemed to be more resilient to the pandemic threats and more capable of managing their practicing routines, whereas more externally motivated musicians experienced a reduction in their dedicated time to practice during lockdown. We suggest pedagogical and policy implications, as well as future lines of research that are oriented toward supporting professional musicians in assessing and understanding their motivational drives so that they can cope with situations that disrupt their professional lives.
Article
Full-text available
[NOTE: An Open Access version of this manuscript will be available shortly.] Research in higher music education acknowledges a persistent divide between performance studies and the realities of musicians’ work. Alongside this is global pressure for curriculum that is more supportive of students’ metacognitive engagement, experiential learning and career preparation. However, the provision of these curricular elements is insufficient unless students recognise their value and engage in them at a deep level; this is because career-long employability in precarious industries such as music is underpinned by life-long and self-regulated learning. This study featured a scaffolded employability intervention with seven student musicians at a European institution. The study had three aims: to understand the students’ career-related thinking and confidence; to determine whether the intervention might be scalable; and to gauge the intervention’s potential efficacy in helping students to become conscious of their learner identity. Results indicate that student musicians are aware of the need to extend their professional capabilities but unaware of how to address these deficits. Participants realised that “learning how to learn” would help them achieve personal-professional goals. The findings suggest that similar in-curricular interventions have the potential to foster a more holistic vision of performance education such that aspiring musicians might graduate as both skilled professionals and agentic learners.
Article
Full-text available
The professional practice of classical music performers has been better understood and enhanced across the last two decades through research aimed at tailoring rehearsing strategies that support the development of a sense of self as an agentic and proactive learner. One approach focuses on helping students make use of various tools that can enhance their learning, particularly in terms of what they do, feel and think when practicing and performing music. This study expands literature on expertise development by embracing the idea that this line of research would benefit from additional studies where the researcher forms part of the research process as an active participant who generates data, especially when these researchers are "members" of the social world they study, and therefore have insider knowledge. Thus, this case study is focused on the first author, a professional cellist who is also a researcher in the educational psychology of music, as the only participant. It extends current research by providing a detailed longitudinal mapping of a professional cellist's preparation across nine profiled concerts in five countries of classical-romantic repertoire and a commercial recording that resulted from 100 weeks of dedicated practice. Anonymous feedback from the audiences and interviews with an expert musician who followed the concerts and the CD recording was also collected. For the data analysis, traditional psychometric measurements were applied to test the internal consistency of the time series data as well as the relationship between variables. In addition, the application of Leximancer analysis of the self-reflections allowed the researchers to probe self-regulated learning (SRL) and self-determination theory (SDT) processes in ways that uniquely mapped, over time, her differing motivations to perform at a high level. Specifically, we report that the cellist's psychological needs and her motivational resources changed across time within the social context of performing music publicly, and that the various self-regulatory processes she drew upon impacted (both positively and negatively) on her ongoing actions, thoughts and feelings. Implications of the study are relevant for all forms of expertise development research, and especially for understandings about the nature of skill development in the context of learning to perform demanding literature in music.
Article
Full-text available
Many professional musicians would describe their careers as somewhat different to the careers they imagined when they were students. This study sought to understand the relationships between musicians' higher music education experiences and their professional work, and to expose the adaptive strategies they employ to sustain their work. The researchers amassed in-depth career narratives from eight musicians who were highly respected international performers. The musicians were also 'multi-professional' musicians in that they were recognised as highly proficient in multiple different roles. Narratives were analysed using selection, optimisation and compensation (SOC) theory. The results suggest that essential professional capabilities should be emphasised in the core curriculum of higher music education. A novel finding is that musicians who identify themselves as learners may be better able to create and sustain a career in music. ARTICLE HISTORY
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - present
Sibelius Academy
Position
  • Lecturer
October 2010 - November 2013
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Position
  • Learning of external representations systems and representational change in different fields of knowledge.
Description
  • Principal Investigator: J. Ignacio Pozo. Code: EDU2010-21995-C02-01.Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation
October 2008 - October 2010
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Position
  • Education for representational change: From implicit theories to scientific knowledge in different educational settings.
Description
  • Principal Investigator: Mª Puy Pérez-Echeverría. Code: SEJ2006-15639-C02-01. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Culture and Education
Education
August 2012 - December 2014
Sibelius Academy
Field of study
  • Early Music
October 2008 - November 2013
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Field of study
  • Educational Psychology
September 2006 - June 2008
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Field of study
  • Pedagogy

Publications

Publications (44)
Article
Full-text available
In the past 2 years our world has experienced huge disruptions because of COVID-19. The performing arts has not been insulated from these tumultuous events with the entire music industry being thrown into a state of instability due to the paralyzing effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. In this study, we examined how classical professional musicians' a...
Article
Full-text available
Making sense of musicians’ professional learning pathways is of crucial importance to understanding their career progressions, their routes into creative employment, and the relevance of various policies to their professional lives. However, this is a far cry from understanding how critical reflection catalyses diverse learning routes, especially w...
Article
Full-text available
[NOTE: An Open Access version of this manuscript will be available shortly.] Research in higher music education acknowledges a persistent divide between performance studies and the realities of musicians’ work. Alongside this is global pressure for curriculum that is more supportive of students’ metacognitive engagement, experiential learning and...
Article
Full-text available
The professional practice of classical music performers has been better understood and enhanced across the last two decades through research aimed at tailoring rehearsing strategies that support the development of a sense of self as an agentic and proactive learner. One approach focuses on helping students make use of various tools that can enhance...
Article
Full-text available
Many professional musicians would describe their careers as somewhat different to the careers they imagined when they were students. This study sought to understand the relationships between musicians' higher music education experiences and their professional work, and to expose the adaptive strategies they employ to sustain their work. The researc...
Article
Full-text available
The classical music sector faces an urgent challenge as increasing numbers of performance graduates struggle to establish themselves as full-time professional musicians. In part, this situation relates to narrow higher music education curricula that do not sufficiently prepare musicians for the precarious and non-linear careers that characterize mu...
Article
Full-text available
One-to-one tuition is an essential part of studying music and is appreciated by the music students. Problems can occur when there are diverse perceptions between teacher practice and student expectations. This study provides research-based evidence on 155 music students' experiences of workload, stress, and coping in their interaction with teachers...
Article
Full-text available
While there is extensive research on student workload in higher education, research-based findings relating to music students' workloads are, to a great extent, lacking. In this study, we aim to review the literature systematically (a) to identify the factors that have an impact on students' experiences of workload (experienced workload) and (b) to...
Article
Full-text available
The widespread cancelation of cultural events during the early 2020 stages of the COVID-19 pandemic led professional performing musicians across the world to experience an increasing economic fragility that threatened their health and wellbeing. Within this “new normal,” developing countries have been at a higher risk due to their vulnerable health...
Chapter
Previous chapters have suggested that to change the way in which music is taught, and specifically instrumental music, as prescribed, the students need to be able to learn music in new ways.
Chapter
This chapter focuses on relevant issues to instrumental music pre-service and in-service teachers, such as the need to strengthen their teaching strategies and skills; the importance of offering pedagogical certification in Higher Education; the importance of reflection on their teaching practices; the types of support available for their developme...
Chapter
Some years ago, in an analysis on what is happening in primary and secondary education classrooms, one of us (Pozo, 2006) referred to the film “The Sleeper” directed by Woody Allen in 1973, to serve as a metaphor for the educational situation.
Chapter
Full-text available
Please keep calm, dear reader, this book is nearly at an end, and we began it by drawing attention to the need for a profound change in instrumental music education. The first two chapters examined the reasons why this change seemed necessary and the presence of a general social awareness that instrumental teaching is currently a non-starter.
Chapter
Full-text available
As we have just seen in previous chapters, ways of learning and teaching are determined by how teachers and students conceive of their learning and teaching functions: what do they think learning and teaching is? What are the goals they hope to achieve? What must the student do to learn and how can the teacher help them? what should evaluation cons...
Article
Full-text available
Proactive coping styles may help students deal with their study workload and stress in healthier ways. In this explanatory mixed methods study, data were gathered among professional students in higher music education in Finland and the United Kingdom about their experiences of workload, stress, and proactive coping. Bivariate analyses were used to...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 lockdown in education institutions required music teachers to use ICTto continue teaching. This research study, with the use of a Likert type online questionnaire, analyses the ICT activities carried out during this period and the learning conceptions they reflect. The questionnaire consisted of the description of activities which vari...
Technical Report
Full-text available
REACT - Rethinking Music Performance in European Higher Education Institutions is an Strategic Partnership project 2020-2023, funded by ERASMUS+, European Commission. REACT is a reaction to a current problem arising from the long-established model for teaching music performance in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs): musicians are trained for acqu...
Chapter
This chapter examines evidence from the research on one-to-one learning and teaching contexts. We conceptualise one-to-one vocal and instrumental teaching as an informal professional discipline that may vary across contexts with regard to purpose, content and pedagogical values and approaches. We discuss the ways that learning is constructed within...
Article
Full-text available
The situational context within which an activity takes place, as well as the personality characteristics of individuals shape the types of strategies people choose in order to regulate their emotions, especially when confronted with challenging or undesirable situations. Taking self-regulation as the framework to study emotions in relation to learn...
Article
Full-text available
Neoliberal education policies-viewing students' life as human capital, economic investment for the labour market and consumer power-may increase students' workload in higher education. In this mixed methods study, we examined music students' experiences of workload in Finland and the United Kingdom in connection with stress and livelihoods. We used...
Book
https://www.edmorata.es/libros/aprender-y-ensenar-musica-un-enfoque-centrado-en-los-alumnos Muchos profesores, y casi todos los alumnos, comparten la experiencia cotidiana de no lograr enseñar o aprender música como les gustaría. La educación musical está en una profunda crisis no siempre reconocida, frente a la cual este libro defiende un cambio...
Chapter
El análisis y la reflexión sobre las prácticas de enseñanza y aprendizaje son esenciales para avanzar en la investigación, la innovación y la formación docente, los tres pilares sobre los que debe sostenerse el cambio educativo. En este capítulo mostraremos que ese análisis requiere profundizar en las prácticas, así como conocer las concepciones de...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Curricular reforms in Western countries call for pedagogical practices that empower and transform students into professional musicians who have the capacity for deep critical thinking and engagement. For this, several pedagogical frameworks that place the student at the centre of learning have been considered during the last decades. This construct...
Article
The aim of this paper is to explore a range of largely embodied vocalisations and sounds produced by learners of string instruments and how they relate to the potential self-regulatory use provided by such vocalisations. This type of 'singing' while learning to play an instrument may have similarities to the use of private speech in other types of...
Article
Full-text available
This layered autoethnography comprises momentary scenes connected to musical pieces for cello that are engraved in my memory and on the calluses of my fingertips by significant physical, emotional, and motivational experiences that have accompanied me since my youth. My artful methodology invokes truthful memory through sound to compose a “methodol...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This toolkit provides information about relevant research on constructivist instrumental music teaching and learning, and offers suggestions for teachers on how to enact pedagogical equality through putting constructivist theories into practice. Constructivist ideals are embedded in the new national core curricula for Basic Education in the Arts, w...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Tämä työkalupakki tarjoaa tietoa konstruktivistisen soiton­ opetuksen ja musiikin oppimisen keskeisestä tutkimuk­ sesta ja antaa suosituksia opettajille siitä, kuinka soveltaa konstruktivismia käytännössä. Taiteen perusopetuksen uudet opetussuunnitelman perusteet (2017) pohjautuvat konstruktivismiin. Se tarkoittaa muun muassa sitä, että soi­ tonope...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
While quality development has an important role in higher education in Finland, its connection with equality and equity in teaching and learning music is not often mentioned. Most of the discussions about equality in education have focused on how to equalize access to and participation in education, but there are disagreements about what the very c...
Article
Full-text available
A case study was conducted on an expert cello teacher and a 7- year-old student, to analyze the relationships between the teacher's constructive conceptions and instructional practices, by means of the System for Analyzing the Practice of Instrumental Lessons. This article describes a constructive teaching model based on: (a) the student's learning...
Presentation
Full-text available
Video File, 24 minutes lecture on constructivism in music education for Arts Equal Research initiative (University of the Arts Helsinki, Finland). Retrieved from http://www.artsequal.fi/-/play-it-again-sam-connections-between-constructivism-and-equality-in-instrumental-music-learning
Article
Full-text available
While many studies have considered the association between teachers’ and students’ conceptions of teaching and learning and classroom practices, few studies have researched the influence of teachers’ conceptions on students’ conceptions. Our objective was to analyze the influence of music teachers’ conceptions on student ideas regarding teaching an...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research on music teaching and the curricula proposed in different countries increasingly insists on moving towards teaching centered on managing students’ mental processes according to the constructivist approach. However, studies on conceptions and practices of teaching–learning show that these still largely focus on transmitting the music...
Conference Paper
We present an exploratory study about the conceptions held by basic level conservatory students about what they think of cello teachers and how different teaching strategies could improve their learning skills, fo- cused on the educational-evolutionary variable. In this research, twelve Spanish children participated, and they were evenly in four di...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
This multidisciplinary and multi-methods research addresses the dramatic effects that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on the entire classical music industry and educational field—understanding the pandemic as a unique pedagogical 'interruption' that can and should inform Higher Music Education (HME) pedagogy, curriculum development, and policy work to strengthen the professional development and careers of a variety of music professionals. Pursuant to that goal, the research responds to global discourses that advocate for a transformation of HME and music professionalism in response to our rapidly changing societies and their ecosystems; in particular, the main objective is to inform and reconstruct HME so as to enable it to creatively prepare future music professionals for the uncertainty, rapid changes, and crises they will surely encounter beyond the COVID-19 pandemic. Within this context, special attention is paid to the sudden changes and demands experienced by HME agents and many stakeholders within the Finnish context before and during the pandemic. Additionally, sub-studies framed at the European and international levels in cooperation with a variety of research collaborators, representative of a wide scope of artistic and academic fields, are also included. Funded by the Jenni and Antti Wihuri Foundation in Finland.
Project
The Transforming Musicianship Project aims at renewing learning and performance practices among classical musicians and transform pedagogy in higher music education by highlighting the importante of learner identity—a type of identity that, despite being crucial to learning, has not got enough attention in music studies or in other educational fields.
Project
Towards a Constructivist Theory of Teaching