Guadalupe Bribiesca-Contreras

Guadalupe Bribiesca-Contreras
Natural History Museum, London · Department of Life Sciences

Ph.D.

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22
Publications
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159
Citations

Publications

Publications (22)
Preprint
The deep sea is the last ecosystem for which patterns of biodiversity are poorly defined. The occurrence, strength, shape and drivers of distributional trends in species richness throughout the deep sea are broadly inconclusive and are poorly explored at a global scale1,2, but this environment faces accelerating pressures with a changing climate an...
Article
Full-text available
Recently, there has been a resurgent interest in the exploration of deep-sea mineral deposits, particularly polymetallic nodules in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCZ), central Pacific. Accurate environmental impact assessment is critical to the effective management of a new industry and depends on a sound understanding of species taxonomy, biogeogra...
Article
The Caymanostellidae is a family of rarely encountered wood-dwelling deep-sea sea-stars, with only six species, in two genera, described to date. During the COBERPES 5 expedition on board the RV 'Justo Sierra', off Tabasco, Gulf of Mexico in 2013, 12 specimens were recovered from a single piece of sunken wood. Herein we describe a new genus and spe...
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Macrofauna are an abundant and diverse component of abyssal benthic communities and are likely to be heavily impacted by polymetallic nodule mining in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCZ). In 2012, the International Seabed Authority (ISA) used available benthic biodiversity data and environmental proxies to establish nine no-mining areas, called Areas...
Article
Aim Biogeographic barriers emerged in the tropical oceans as continental masses moved with plate tectonics, and as the tropics contracted to lower latitudes from the late Eocene. These barriers have shaped tropical marine biodiversity. We characterize large‐scale diversity patterns for tropical brittle stars and investigate the effect of biogeograp...
Article
The Derwent River seastar, ‘Marginaster’ littoralis (Echinodermata: Asteroidea), has been assessed as critically endangered owing to its highly restricted range within one estuary in Tasmania, Australia. However, there have been concerns about the validity and status of the species. Here, we use non-invasive X-ray computed tomography to review the...
Article
Caves are a useful system for testing evolutionary and biogeographic hypotheses, as they are isolated, and their environmental conditions have resulted in adaptive selection across different taxa. Although in recent years many more cave species have been discovered, cave-dwelling members of the class Ophiuroidea (brittle stars) remain scarce. Out o...
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Our knowledge of the distribution and evolution of deep-sea life is limited, impeding our ability to identify priority areas for conservation¹. Here we analyse large integrated phylogenomic and distributional datasets of seafloor fauna from the sea surface to the abyss and from equator to pole of the Southern Hemisphere for an entire class of inver...
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Brittle-stars in the family Ophiocomidae are large and colourful inhabitants of tropical shallow water habitats across the globe. Here we use targeted capture and next-generation sequencing to generate robust phylogenomic trees for 39 of the 43 species in order to test the monophyly of existing genera. The large genus Ophiocoma, as currently consti...
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O'Loughlin, P.M. and Bribiesca-Contreras, G. 2017. New asterinid seastars from the Pacific Ocean (Echinodermata: Asteroidea). Memoirs of Museum Victoria 76: 121-132. Three new Aquilonastra O'Loughlin (in O'Loughlin and Waters, 2004) species are described: Aquilonastra donia sp. nov. for New Caledonia, lodged in the Muséum national d'Histoire nature...
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The aim of the present work is to report and describe three new species of the tropical brittle-star genus Ophiolepis . The new species are described herein as Ophiolepis aemulata sp. nov., Ophiolepis buitronae sp. nov. and Ophiolepis crebra sp. nov. As these species were previously misidentified, morphological traits and similarities between them...
Article
Our knowledge of macro-evolutionary processes in the deep sea is poor, leading to much speculation about whether the deep sea is a source or sink of evolutionary adaptation. Here, we use a phylogenetic approach, on large molecular (688 species, 275 kbp) and distributional datasets (104 513 records) across an entire class of marine invertebrates (Op...
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Full-text available
One specimen of Ophiura ljungmani Lyman, 1878 was collected in an anchialine cave in Cozumel Island, Quintana Roo. The finding represents the first record of this ophiuroid in an anchialine cave, and also the shallower record for the species in any habitat.
Article
A method for representing 2D (two-dimensional) tree objects is described. This representation is based on a chain code, which is called the Slope Chain Code (SCC). Thus, 2D tree objects are described by means of a chain of element strings suitably combined by means of parentheses. These 2D tree objects correspond to naturally existing 2D tree struc...
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Full-text available
The echinoderm species richness of the Aerolito de Paraiso anchialine cave, on Cozumel Island, in the Mexican Caribbean, is assessed on the basis of morphological and DNA barcoding data. We included specimens from this cave system and from different open sea areas, and employed two different approaches for species delineation based on DNA barcoding...
Article
Full-text available
The anchialine cave Aerolito de Paraiso is located in Cozumel Island, Mexico. It is unique because it is mainly inhabited by four classes of echinoderms. After reviewing all of the material collected for this location, we present a taxonomic list composed of 22 species of echinoderms. Ophiuroidea is the best represented class in the anchialine cave...

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