Grigorio Lamprinakos

Grigorio Lamprinakos
University of Birmingham · Birmingham Business School

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About

7
Publications
2,032
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72
Citations
Introduction
Grigorios currently works at the Business School of the University of Birmingham. Grigorios' broader research interests focus on the cognitive and meta-cognitive processes that drive attitudinal and behavioural change.
Additional affiliations
May 2015 - present
Athens University of Economics and Business
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Research on the underling mechanisms through which emotions may affect persuasion processes leading to attitude and behavior change.
Education
February 2009 - March 2011
Athens University of Economics and Business
Field of study
  • Marketing and Communication

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
Full-text available
Due to its immense popularity amongst marketing practitioners, online personalized advertising is increasingly becoming the subject of academic research. Although advertisers need to collect a large amount of customer information to develop customized online adverts, the effect of how this information is collected on advert effectiveness has been s...
Article
Full-text available
Background The effect of COVID-19 on Health-Care Professionals’ mental health has received increased attention in the last year’s literature. However, previous studies essentially evaluated psychopathological symptoms and not the presence of positive mental health. Therefore, the first objective of the present research is to evaluate health-care pr...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, we investigate the factors affecting consumers’ purchase intention toward influencers’ personal owned brands. By using the theoretical lens of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) we explore consumers’ purchase intentions towards influencers own brands and discuss the importance of previously held attitudes, subjective norms and per...
Article
The present research demonstrates for the first time that the very same emotion can influence information processing and persuasion depending on the appraisal of the emotion that is highlighted. Across studies, we predicted and found that anger, surprise, and awe can each lead to relatively higher or lower levels of information processing depending...
Article
Purpose In the context of European consumers’ experiences of austerity, this study aims to advance current resilience theory in marketing through developing persistent resilience from a context of austerity influenced consumption. Design/methodology/approach Following an interpretivist approach, 38 face to face, in-depth interviews were conducted...
Article
Anger, disgust, surprise, and awe are multifaceted emotions. Both anger and disgust are associated with feeling unpleasant as well as experiencing a sense of confidence, whereas surprise and awe tend to be more pleasant emotions that are associated with doubt. Most prior work has examined how appraisals (confidence, pleasantness) lead people to exp...
Article
Full-text available
The beneficial effect of self-affirmation on the reduction of people’s defensive responses and the increase in message acceptance has been widely demonstrated in different health-related topics. However, little is known about the specific conditions in which self-affirmation strategies might be more effective. Our objective is to explore the interp...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The most recent line of research examines the relationship between meta-cognition and responsible decision making, particularly with regard to responsible and sustainable decision making. This project focuses on the moderating role of power on socially responsible behaviour, via thought validation. Results from this line of research suggests that self-validation may accommodate apparently contradictory sets of results, indicating that power can either increase or decrease socially responsible behaviour, depending on the momentarily salient mindset.