Gregory Veeck

Gregory Veeck
Western Michigan University | WMU · Department of Geography

Ph.D. University of Georgia

About

74
Publications
36,560
Reads
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885
Citations
Citations since 2017
11 Research Items
433 Citations
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Introduction
Gregory Veeck is a professor in the Department of Geography at Western Michigan University specializing in economic geography, agriculture, rural development, and rural environmental/ecological issues. Most research is conducted in Asia, and he has lived and worked in China for approximately 7.5 years. He has served as a consultant to the Asian Development Bank and the World Bank.
Additional affiliations
September 1999 - present
Western Michigan University
January 1999 - December 2017
Western Michigan University
Position
  • Professor
July 1988 - December 1998
Louisiana State University

Publications

Publications (74)
Article
Chinese and western scholars have long drafted maps delineating China’s diverse agricultural regions. Historically, these agro-regionalization schemes were based on dominant crops, first-order soil groups, elevation, climatic variables, or some combination of these factors. However, rapid changes in supply chains, production systems and agro-techno...
Article
With a population of 3.5 million and growing in the US, Middle Eastern / North African (MENA) Americans are an integral part of the United States and the world. One of the main agents of cultural maintenance and support for the MENA American community are their ethnic food traditions, specifically Halal food. Since the introduction of Halal food in...
Article
Human geographers use many types of research techniques, often in a mixed methods format where multiple approaches and technologies are incorporated in a single study. This reflects the synthetic nature of our discipline, one of its central tenets and a major strength vis-à-vis other disciplines. Interviews are essential to many of our projects, an...
Article
Full-text available
China and the United States are the two most significant nations in the contemporary global food and agricultural network. In addition, they are two of the most important innovators with respect to the development of new crop varieties, agro-technologies, farm products, markets and consumer issues, such as consumer resistance to genetically modifie...
Article
Nanjing, the capital of China's Jiangsu Province, has grown rapidly during the post-reform era and the pace of change placed tremendous pressure on the city's arable land resources. This case study of land use/land cover change (LU/LC) in Nanjing's Jiangning district assesses changes in agricultural land, production, and labor within the ten 2016-e...
Article
Through dual-period surveys in urban China, administered in the years 1996 and 2013, this study investigates changes in the relationship among personal factors and the attitudes toward the adoption of new food consumption patterns as food systems develop. A structural equation model (SEM) is used to measure the association among three personal fact...
Article
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This is a short research NOTE, not really an article, on issues related to consumer safety and issues related to problems in China's supply chain for foodstuffs.
Article
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Post-2000 efforts to protect China’s pastoral areas are distinct from earlier efforts in that funding for the most recent round of policies and programs is commensurate with the task. Even with appropriate funding, however, effective methods of mitigating pasture degradation are widely disputed. The most controversial of the current policies includ...
Article
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There is long-standing tension between the theories and methods espoused by scholars researching and writing about applied ecological economic principles AND the actual strategies practically employed by organic farmers and others committed to ecologically-sound agricultural practices. Recent trends including changes in consumer demand and preferen...
Article
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In many areas of rural China, pig feasts have long functioned as a vital ritual exchange among codependent farm households. Called sha nian zhu (roughly translated as “killing the year's pig”), the annual reciprocal feast has traditionally served to maintain community identities, provide aid, and strengthen social ties. Based on interviews with far...
Book
Full-text available
Greg Veeck is pleased to announce the publication of the third edition of China’s Geography. Given the substantive differences from the last edition readers, both students and faculty might well consider it to be a new book. In contrast to many recent specialized contributions to China studies, the volume takes a broad and balanced view from a hist...
Article
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Family farms have long generated income from agricultural tourism including U-picks, wagon rides, corn mazes and petting zoos, but contemporary agricultural tourism reflects much greater sophistication in terms of product variety, services, activities, and marketing. In Michigan, farm operators have moved beyond classic products and activities and...
Article
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Since 2000, there has been an ambitious governmental effort to protect China's grassland resources through new, often controversial, policies and programs backed up by massive capital investments and subsidies. The policies are intended to protect pastoral ecological systems while allowing the pasture-based husbandry sector to continue to evolve in...
Article
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The past decade has seen what could reasonably be called an explosion in the number of food-related crises in China. Food safety issues represent a national crisis threatening the physical and psychological health of Chinese citizens, despite the repeated adoption of stringent food safety laws and regulations. This project, based on a stratified ra...
Article
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Purpose – This study aims to examine the major influences of food choices of Chinese teenagers within a dynamic food marketing environment. Design/methodology/approach – The paper reports findings from semi-structured interviews with high school students which examine teenagers’ guidelines for selecting food, along with their actual eating behavio...
Chapter
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The clear benefit of international trade comes as no surprise to economic geographers or to most of the readers of this volume. What might surprise readers is how, increasingly, national statistics related to the proportional share of international trade, especially for merchandise, for China and the U.S. appear to be converging. While wealthier na...
Chapter
Full-text available
The many roles of the Chinese state with respect to the construction and maintenance of agricultural markets is a central theme addressed in numerous chapters in this volume. This chapter will review the role of the state in the transformation of China’s grain markets from 1978 to the present with a focus on the impact that government policies and...
Article
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Since the economic reforms of the late 1970s, China has implemented a number of initiatives designed to stimulate local economies and protect environmental conditions in its rural western provinces. An area of particular concern is the Inner Mongolian steppes, which lie northwest of Beijing and are both economically depressed and a major source of...
Article
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The rapid growth of China's economy – averaging 9.1% per year for the 35 years since 1978 – has many implications for China's domestic food and agriculture sector as well for the global food system. The more the nation's economy expands, the more food is needed to feed an ever-growing middle class with significantly different consumption patterns t...
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By reviewing the changes in China's agricultural reforms since 1978 from the perspective of its initiator, guide, designer and organizer, the author defines two stages of agricultural reforms: one is the bottom-up stage in early 1980s and the other is the top-down stage after China's entry into WTO. With a comprehensive quantitative-qualitative ana...
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Using field work in Madagascar as the foundation for a case study, two U.S.-based geographers examine the complex relations developing between many African nations and the Chinese government as well as ethnic Chinese citizens and guest-workers who live and work in Africa. The study investigates changes in the perceptions of Malagasy citizens of the...
Article
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Two specialists on China's agricultural sector review the recent course of agrarian reform in the country since the year 2000. More specifically, they summarize the more significant policy changes occurring during the period 2000-2009 (including the rollout of major new programs and agricultural tax relief) while simultaneously tracking impressive...
Article
From both inside and outside of China, there have been many recently published volumes on China’s post-revolution history at the national scale. As with similar histories of many nations, such volumes outline the major events and players that brought the nation to its current state. The least of these books serve as summaries of China’s tumultuous...
Article
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Contributions to tto this special issue collectively reveal the unique contributions of geography and geographers to overseas study, including: the inner-workings and transformative potential of multicountry programs; how to integrate geography into traditional language-oriented programs; the challenges of doing geographic research and training und...
Article
: The sluggish rate of growth for China's grain production during the past decade is a major concern for agricultural planners. At the national level, the average rate of production fell to 1.8 percent per year from 1985 to 1990, after an average growth rate of 4.7 percent per year from 1978 to 1984. Supplies and application rates of critical farm...
Article
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An American economic geographer specializing in the agricultural sector of China's economy presents a study of that country's trade in agricultural products. The paper is focused on patterns of change in the regional distribution of agricultural and aquacultural exports and imports before and after China's accession to the World Trade Organization...
Article
If previously the development of China’s agricultural sector was of limited interest to scholars working on topics distant from the farm, awareness of the recent penetration of China’s farm exports abroad, agricultural environmental issues, and the increasing role that China plays in global agricultural markets via WTO membership has finally gotten...
Article
China’s food security had its five minutes of fame way back in 1995 when the publication of Lester Brown’s controversial book Food in China: Wake-up Call for a Small Planet (New York: W. W. Norton, 1995) caused a genuine flurry of interest in the topic among Western press and television pundits. Those of us conducting research related to agricultur...
Article
Agricultural tourism incorporates visits to farms for the purposes of on-site retail purchases, enjoyment, and education. Long popular in the European Union (EU), agritourism is gaining popularity throughout the United States. Interest has grown as a result of stagnant grain prices, rising farm costs, and growing international competition. For rura...
Conference Paper
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Michigan agricultural producers, faced with declining commodity prices, rising production costs, and increased global competition, have looked at agritourism as a way to save the farm as well as provide customers with personalized service; high-quality, fresh food; and farm, nature, and family experiences. While previous research on agritourism ind...
Article
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In late 1999, President Jiang Zemin requested that a comprehensive regional development campaign be designed and implemented to address growing disparities in income, development, and quality of life across three of China's macro-regions: eastern lowland China, central China, and western China. Through the resulting “Strategy of Developing China's...
Article
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The Doha Round of the WTO has faltered in the face of the inability of signatory nations to come to agreement on trade in agricultural products. A case study of the apple trade in East Asia illustrates conditions facing small farmers and exporters of horticultural products throughout the world, and identifies barriers to trade and equity. Cumbersom...
Article
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Abstract Economic reform and restructuring in China have resulted in substantial changes in how farmers earn their livings and how much they earn. Based on a neoclassical model of economic development and structural change as interpreted by Oshima (1983) for East Asia, we hypothesize that farmers in Jiangsu Province earn greater incomes from off-fa...
Article
Erosion is a pressing problem throughout rural China, but the problem is most severe within the Loess Plateau of north central China. The Loess Plateau is losing an average of one centimeter of soil each year due to erosion and related environmental problems. The eroded loess clogs irrigation systems, restricts navigation on all rivers within the r...
Article
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Agricultural restructuring has disproportionately impacted smaller US farms, such as those in Michigan where the average farm size is 215acres. To keep agricultural land in production, entrepreneurial Michigan farmers are utilizing agritourism as a value-added way to capitalize on their comparative advantages, their diverse agricultural products, a...
Chapter
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This book, consisting of 24 chapters, draws upon selected, revised, and edited papers from the 5th British-American Rural Geography Symposium held in Devon in July 2003. It focuses on rural regions in the UK, the USA, and Canada that are facing conflicting demands, pressures and challenges, having far-reaching implications for rural space and socie...
Article
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Based on results of the 2000 census, Hispanics are now the largest, and fastest growing ethnic group in the U.S. Historically, the Hispanic population in the state of Michigan has been very modest in size and spatially concentrated in the Detroit metro area. Starting in 1980 but with a much faster rate growth in the last decade, Hispanics have incr...
Article
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A team of American and Chinese geographers investigates the technical changes, changes in markets, and new production methods that have allowed the profitable production of vegetables almost year-round near Shijiazhuang, Hebei Province on the North China Plain. Based on a case study of 160 farm households, and adopting a micro-economic approach, th...
Article
Based on a survey sample of 483 farm households in three provinces of the Republic of Korea, we report on the perspectives of full-time farmers regarding trade liberalisation, its effects on their lives, and the future of small-scale farming. The report includes opinions obtained from interviews and the results of 27 Likert scale items in our field...
Article
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The remarkable economic changes occurring within the People’s Republic of China since 1978 have resulted in striking alteration in food consumption patterns for urban Chinese residents. Higher incomes, busier life styles, greater choices in food retailers, the increasing availability of refrigeration, and the greater variety in food choice have all...
Article
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China's agricultural sector requires reforms to assure farmers and consumers of fair prices while protecting the environment and permitting sustainable growth in the coming years. The affluent eastern province of Jiangsu is an appropriate site in which to explore the effects of agricultural reforms on rural households and, in turn, the effects of t...
Article
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Recent economic reforms and restructuring in China have resulted in significant changes in the nature and efficiency of farm production. In southern Jiangsu (SUNAN), a region developing and urbanizing rapidly, farm family income is highly dependent on off-farm employment. In places, this has led to stagnating agricultural production and productivit...
Article
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Research on the impact of changes in farm scale on productivity and production efficiency has received increasing attention in response to the rural economic reforms beginning in late 1980 in Heilongjiang Province, PRC. The growth of rural industry and other off-farm employment opportunities has raised questions regarding potential returns to impro...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Despite the many great changes in China’s political system, self-sufficiency in food has been an enduring commitment ever since the revolution of 1949. As late as 1999, due to wide-ranging policies related to prices, subsidies, land usufruct rights and rural taxes, the nation largely met domestic demand and recorded only slight deficits in international trade in agricultural products. Even as late as 2007, the nation was a net exporter of grain—especially corn. However, with the rapid expansion of the nation’s middle class and a better diet for all, meat and flour consumption skyrocketed altering both production systems and the mix of farm products required by domestic consumers and manufacturers. It is not that the nation can no longer feed itself, rather, changing governmental perspectives has created a new normal focused more on comparative advantage and less on political exigency. As a consequence since 2008, China has emerged as a major importer of corn, wheat and rice. In addition, it is currently the largest importer of soybeans. Imports of agricultural products in the 2012-2013 fiscal year were valued at over $106 billion with over 50% derived from grains, soy and other oil seeds. In this field-based mixed methods (quantitative spatial models combined with qualitative interviews of grain importers and officials) study, four crops, corn, wheat, soy and rice, are compared in terms of the changes in spatial production and prices. I am also interested in why imports of soy and rice are growing so rapidly, the reasons these products are imported, the supply chains that have developed, and the implications of growing levels of imports on the global trading system. China has emerged as a price setter in both products, but for significantly different reasons.