Gregory Charles Sartor

Gregory Charles Sartor
University of Connecticut | UConn · Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Ph.D.

About

31
Publications
4,464
Reads
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1,330
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2018 - present
University of Connecticut
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2011 - July 2018
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2006 - July 2011
Medical University of South Carolina
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
August 2006 - August 2011
Medical University of South Carolina
Field of study
  • Neuroscience
August 2000 - May 2005
University of Mississippi
Field of study
  • Biology and Psychology

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
Full-text available
Prolonged drug use causes long-lasting neuroadaptations in reward-related brain areas that contribute to addiction. Despite significant amount of research dedicated to understanding the underlying mechanisms of addiction, the molecular underpinnings remain unclear. At the same time, much of the pervasive transcription that encompasses the human gen...
Article
Full-text available
Unlabelled: Epigenetic processes that regulate histone acetylation play an essential role in behavioral and molecular responses to cocaine. To date, however, only a small fraction of the mechanisms involved in the addiction-associated acetylome have been investigated. Members of the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family of epigenetic "reader"...
Article
Epigenetic pharmacotherapy for CNS-related diseases is a burgeoning area of research. In particular, members of the bromodomain and extra-terminal domain (BET) family of proteins have emerged as intriguing therapeutic targets due to their putative involvement in an array of brain diseases. With their ability to bind to acetylated histones and act a...
Article
Epigenetic pharmacotherapies have emerged as a promising treatment option for substance use disorder (SUD) due to their ability to reverse maladaptive transcriptional and behavioral responses to drugs of abuse. In particular, inhibitors of bromodomain and extra terminal domain (BET) reader proteins have been shown to reduce cocaine- and opioid-seek...
Article
Full-text available
Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors may have therapeutic utility in multiple neurological and psychiatric disorders, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we identify BRD4, a BET bromodomain reader of acetyl-lysine histones, as an essential component involved in potentiated expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and...
Article
Epigenetic mechanisms play important roles in the maladaptive transcriptional and behavioral responses to drugs of abuse. Inhibition of bromodomain and extra-terminal domain (BET) proteins, a class of histone acetylation reader proteins, has been shown to reduce cocaine-seeking behaviors in animal models of addiction. To date, the role of BET prote...
Article
Recent research has revealed that targeting epigenetic proteins is an effective strategy to reduce drug-seeking behaviors in animal models of addiction. We have found that expression of epigenetic reader proteins, called Bromodomains and Extra terminal Domain (BET), are increased in the nucleus accumbens following cocaine self-administration and th...
Article
Innovative breakthroughs in nanotechnology are having a substantial impact in healthcare, especially for brain diseases where effective therapeutic delivery systems are desperately needed. Nanoparticle delivery systems offer an unmatched ability of not only conveying a diverse array of diagnostic and therapeutic agents across complex biological bar...
Preprint
Full-text available
Epigenetic pharmacotherapies have emerged as a promising treatment option for substance use disorder (SUD) due to their ability to reverse maladaptive transcriptional and behavioral responses to drugs of abuse. In particular, inhibitors of bromodomain and extra terminal domain (BET) reader proteins have been shown to reduce cocaine- and opioid-seek...
Article
Epigenetic mechanisms play important roles in the neurobiology of substance use disorder. In particular, bromodomain and extra-terminal domain (BET) proteins, a class of histone acetylation readers, have been found to regulate cocaine conditioned behaviors, but their role in the behavioral response to other drugs of abuse remains unclear. To addres...
Article
Identifying novel therapeutics for the treatment of substance use disorder (SUD) is an area of intensive investigation. Prior strategies that have attempted to modify one or a few neurotransmitter receptors have had limited success, and currently there are no FDA-approved medications for the treatment of cocaine, methamphetamine, and marijuana use...
Article
Full-text available
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of age-related dementia. Neuropathological hallmarks of AD include brain deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques and accumulation of both hyperphosphorylated and acetylated tau. RGFP-966, a brain-penetrant and selective HDAC3 inhibitor, or HDAC3 silencing, increases BDNF expression, increases histone H3 an...
Article
Cocaine abuse increases the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. By using a mouse model for cocaine abuse/use, we found that repeated cocaine injection led to increased blood pressure and aortic stiffness in mice associated with elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS)...
Article
Full-text available
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) comprises multifactorial ailments for which current therapeutic strategies remain insufficient to broadly address the underlying pathophysiology. Epigenetic gene regulation relies upon multifactorial processes that regulate multiple gene and protein pathways, including those involved in AD. We therefore took an epigenetic a...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract RationaleAlcoholism is a complex disorder in which diverse pathophysiological processes contribute to initiation and progression, resulting in a high degree of heterogeneity among patients. Few pharmacotherapies are presently available, and patient responses to these are variable. The nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) receptor has been suggeste...
Article
Full-text available
Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by well-defined neuropathological brain changes including amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and the presence of chronic neuroinflammation. Objective: The brain penetrant BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 has been shown to regulate inflammation responses...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies have shown that post-retrieval extinction training attenuates fear and reward-related memories in both humans and rodents. This non-invasive, behavioral approach has the potential to be used in clinical settings to treat maladaptive memories that underlie several psychiatric disorders, including drug addiction. However, few studies t...
Article
Full-text available
Lateral hypothalamus (LH) orexin neurons are essential for the expression of a cocaine place preference. However, the afferents that regulate the activity of these orexin neurons during reward behaviors are not completely understood. Using tract tracing combined with Fos staining, we examined LH afferents for Fos induction during cocaine preference...
Article
Full-text available
Orexins/hypocretins are hypothalamic peptides involved in arousal and wakefulness, but also play a critical role in drug addiction and reward-related behaviors. Here, we review the roles played by orexins in a variety of animal models of drug addiction, emphasizing both commonalities and differences for orexin's involvement in seeking of the major...
Article
Full-text available
Orexins (also called hypocretins) have been shown to be importantly involved in reward and addiction, but little is known about the circuitry that regulates orexin neuronal activity during drug-seeking behaviors. Here, we examined inputs to the lateral hypothalamus (LH) orexin cell field from the lateral septum (LS) using tract-tracing and Fos immu...
Article
Full-text available
Vivo-morpholinos are commercially available morpholino oligomers with a terminal octa-guanidinium dendrimer for enhanced cell-permeability. Existing evidence from systemically delivered vivo-morpholinos indicate that genetic suppression can last from days to weeks without evidence of cellular toxicity. However, intravenously delivered vivo-morpholi...
Article
Full-text available
On April 24-27, 2010, the Motivational Neuronal Networks meeting took place in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. The conference was devoted to "Emerging, re-emerging, and forgotten brain areas" of the reward circuit. A central feature of the conference was four scholarly discussions of cutting-edge topics related to the conference's theme. These...
Article
Full-text available
Orexins (also named hypocretins) are recently discovered neuropeptides made exclusively in the hypothalamus. Recent studies have shown that orexin cells located specifically in lateral hypothalamus (LH) are involved in motivated behavior for drugs of abuse as well as natural rewards. Administration of orexin has been shown to stimulate food consump...
Article
Orexins (synonymous with hypocretins) are recently discovered neuropeptides made exclusively in hypothalamus. Behavioral, anatomical, and neurophysiological studies show that a subset of these cells, specifically those in lateral hypothalamus (LH), are involved in reward processing and addictive behaviors. Fos expression in LH orexin neurons varied...

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