Gregory J. Hoplamazian

Gregory J. Hoplamazian
Loyola University Maryland · Department of Communication

Ph.D.

About

7
Publications
3,855
Reads
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241
Citations
Introduction
Identity in advertising, especially related to race/ethnicity, religion, and sports team affiliation. Interested in emerging media applications of advertising and public relations tactics, including social marketing and the effect of eWOM on consumer attitudes.
Additional affiliations
July 2011 - present
Loyola University Maryland
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
September 2006 - August 2011
The Ohio State University
Position
  • Graduate Associate

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
Full-text available
The social identity framework suggests that exposure to high-status ingroup or low-status outgroup portrayals enhances self-esteem through positive ingroup distinctiveness. In this study, the effects of racial group portrayals in print advertisements on Blacks’ and Whites’ self-esteem and advertising responses were investigated in an experiment. A...
Article
Full-text available
The recent growth of mobile channels has provided steadily increasing opportunities for individuals to access news and other mass-mediated content. Media ecological perspectives argue that the introduction of such new technologies can shift the existing biases in prevailing social systems. According to one ecological perspective, the theory of the...
Article
Full-text available
Research on minority appearances in advertising has suggested that racial minorities need to be not only more numerically represented but more appropriately portrayed in a variety of social class contexts. While studies have explored the impact of character race on viewer responses to advertising, little empirical work has been done to understand t...
Article
Full-text available
Using data from a post-test only experiment with random assignment, this article examines whether differing music genres influence socially relevant decisions made by listeners. A sample of White college students was exposed to1 of 3 music genres during an ostensible waiting period, and was then asked to allocate funding to projects for different e...
Article
Full-text available
Based on gender schema theory, social role theory, and social-cognitive theory, this study investigated whether biological sex and gender conformity (femininity and masculinity) predict selective exposure to gender-typed magazines and whether this exposure, in turn, reinforces gender conformity. Participants browsed full issues—three women’s magazi...
Article
Full-text available
As mobile media have grown more advanced, and mobile Internet access has increased to a near-ubiquitous state, media use is often described as occurring “anytime, anyplace”. Consequently, measuring media use and understanding competition and coexistence within such an environment is a constant challenge for researchers. To help address this issue t...
Article
Full-text available
This review highlights how a relatively novel online platform - VoiceThread - can serve several roles in the advertising classroom for not only content delivery, but for submitting work, receiving feedback in a variety of formats, and engaging in dynamic discussions. While primarily a tool for asynchronous discussions, VoiceThread can be used to ac...

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
This project uses apologia theory to examine how NFL players respond to getting in trouble with the law. In particular, it focuses on how social media channels such as Twitter and Instagram feature into athletes' response to crisis. Content analysis of the 10 social media posts following a crisis incident reveals a heavy use of religious or inspirational quotes, and very little direct recognition of wrongdoing.