Gregory Hall

Gregory Hall
Boston University | BU · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

DVM

About

4
Publications
301
Reads
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51
Citations
Additional affiliations
June 2008 - August 2008
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Position
  • Summer Fellow
Description
  • Summer fellowship for veterinary students. Worked with a ferret model of Helicobacter infection and a murine model of insulin resistance/non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
Education
September 2006 - May 2010
The Ohio State University
Field of study
  • Veterinary Medicine
August 2002 - May 2006
Cornell University
Field of study
  • Natural Resources

Publications

Publications (4)
Chapter
Previous methods of infecting mice with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) required suppression of host immune function or ablation of the gut microbiota to induce susceptibility to gastrointestinal colonization. Consequently, many pathogen-host interactions occurring in immunocompetent hosts during STEC infection and Shiga toxicosis have remaine...
Article
Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) are globally important gastrointestinal pathogens causing hemorrhagic gastroenteritis with variable progression to potentially fatal Shiga toxicosis. Little is known about potential effects of E. coli- derived Shiga-like toxins on host gastrointestinal immune responses during infection in part due to lack of a r...
Article
Full-text available
Ribotoxic Shiga toxins are the primary cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in patients infected with Shiga toxin-producing enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (STEC), a pathogen class responsible for epidemic outbreaks of gastrointestinal disease around the globe. HUS is a leading cause of pediatric renal failure in otherwise healthy children,...
Article
Insulin resistance is a defining feature of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus but also may occur independently of these conditions. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the hepatic manifestation of these disorders, increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, mechanisms linking hyperinsulinemia to NAFLD and HCC...

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