Greg Pelletier

Greg Pelletier
Southern California Coastal Water Research Project | SCCWRP · Biogeochemistry

M.S.E., P.E.
Using data and numerical models to analyze the vulnerability of sensitive marine organisms to ocean acidification

About

33
Publications
23,276
Reads
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1,284
Citations
Introduction
Greg specializes in using numerical modeling and data analysis to evaluate the vulnerability of sensitive marine organisms to ocean acidification and hypoxia in coastal waters.
Additional affiliations
October 2019 - present
Southern California Coastal Water Research Project
Position
  • Senior Researcher
Description
  • Application of numerical models for research on ocean acidification of coastal waters.
February 1988 - October 2019
Washington State Department of Ecology
Position
  • Engineer
Education
September 1980 - June 1984
University of Washington Seattle
Field of study
  • Environmental Engineering

Publications

Publications (33)
Article
Full-text available
A pilot study of sampling, using monthly marine flights over spatially distributed stations, was conducted with the aim to characterize the carbonate system in Puget Sound over a full year-long period. Surface waters of Puget Sound were found to be under-saturated with respect to aragonite during October–March, and super-saturated during April–Sept...
Article
Full-text available
Fingerprinting ocean acidification (OA) in U.S. West Coast waters is extremely challenging due to the large magnitude of natural carbonate chemistry variations common to these regions. Additionally, quantifying a change requires information about the initial conditions, which is not readily available in most coastal systems. In an effort to address...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean acidification (OA) is projected to have profound impacts on marine ecosystems and resources, especially in estuarine habitats. Here, we describe biological risks under current levels of exposure to anthropogenic OA in the Salish Sea, an estuarine system that already experiences inherently low pH and aragonite saturation state (Ωar) conditions...
Article
Oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from the atmosphere has changed ocean biogeochemistry and threatened the health of organisms through a process known as ocean acidification (OA). Such large-scale changes affect ecosystem functions and can have effects on societal uses, fisheries resources, and economies. In many large estuarie...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal-estuarine habitats are rapidly changing due to global climate change, with impacts influenced by the variability of carbonate chemistry conditions. However, our understanding of the responses of ecologically and economically important calcifiers to pH variability and temporal variation is limited, particularly with respect to shell-building...
Article
Full-text available
The Washington State Department of Ecology conducted a large-scale ocean acidification (OA) study in greater Puget Sound to: (1) produce a marine carbon dioxide (CO2) system dataset capable of distinguishing between long-term anthropogenic changes and natural variability, (2) characterize how rivers and freshwater drive OA conditions in the region,...
Article
Full-text available
Sewage discharges constitute severe stress in freshwater ecosystems. The Ramalhoso River belongs to the Tagus River watershed and was chosen for a pilot study on the impact of wastewaters discharges in a freshwater ecosystem and its ability for self-depuration. Twelve water samples were collected along the river and were georeferenced. The first po...
Article
Full-text available
The quality of water, under the influence of the wastewater treatment plant’s discharges, makes the simulation of the water parameters a key issue, broadly when considering intermittent rivers. In the case of study, the Pracana reservoir works as an example of the characterization, monitoring and control of the impact of several wastewater treatmen...
Article
Recent research suggests that reservoirs might be a potentially important source of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere that is often unaccounted for in carbon cycle. The authors developed an advanced model coupling eco-hydrology with biogeochemical cycle (NICE-BGC). The model incorporates complex coupling of hydrologic-carbon cycle in terrestrial-a...
Article
Full-text available
Fingerprinting ocean acidification (OA) in US West Coast waters is extremely challenging due to the large magnitude of natural carbonate chemistry variations common to these regions. Additionally, quantifying a change requires information about the initial conditions, which is not readily available in most coastal systems. In an effort to address t...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing levels of nutrients, persistent hypoxia, harmful algal blooms, and increased frequency of fish kills are degrading the ecological health of the Salish Sea. An improved version of a diagnostic hydrodynamic and biogeochemical model (nutrients, phytoplankton, carbon, dissolved oxygen, and pH) of the Salish Sea has been developed with the ab...
Article
Full-text available
While ocean acidification was first investigated as a global phenomenon, coastal acidification has received significant attention in recent years, as its impacts have been felt by different socio-economic sectors (e.g., high mortality of shellfish larvae in aquaculture farms). As a region that connects land and ocean, the Salish Sea (consisting of...
Article
Full-text available
The study was to characterize and understand the water quality of the river Yamuna in Delhi (India) prior to an efficient restoration plan. A combination of collection of monitored data, mathematical modeling, sensitivity, and uncertainty analysis has been done using the QUAL2Kw, a river quality model. The model was applied to simulate DO, BOD, tot...
Article
A new stochastic water quality modeling tool was applied to quantify potential climate change effects on a nutrient impaired reach in the Pacific Northwest. This tool allows for multiple stochastic inputs for steady state river water quality simulations. A previously published calibrated deterministic model of the targeted reach was adapted for thi...
Article
Full-text available
In-stream water-quality models provide guidance in watershed management decisions by linking pollutant loads to changes in water quality. These models are particularly useful for determining wasteload allocations, developing numeric nutrient criteria, and aiding in total maximum daily load (TMDL) analyses. Unfortunately, the routine data collected...
Presentation
Full-text available
This study was considered a first step toward understanding the relative importance of major contaminant loading pathways that contribute PCBs and PBDEs to Lake Washington, as well as understanding their long term fate and the potential recovery. The primary goal was to develop a more complete understanding of the processes controlling the ultimate...
Article
The Bagmati River in Kathmandu Valley (Nepal) receives seven major polluted tributaries. Discharges of wastewaters containing degradable organics and nutrients have resulted in decrease in DO concentrations along its course. A one-dimensional stream water quality model QUAL2Kw was calibrated and confirmed using the data in 2000. The model represent...
Article
To date the impact of thermal emissions has not been addressed in life cycle assessment despite the narrow thermal tolerance of most aquatic species. A method to derive characterization factors for the impact of cooling water discharges on aquatic ecosystems was developed which uses space and time explicit integration of fate and effects of water t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Since its introduction in the 1970s as a valid and useful approach to simulating free flows, various mathematical implementations of Lagrangian plume models were developed and verified, both for atmospheric and aquatic discharges. Valid for both jets and plumes, some of these models, including the Visual Plumes UM3 and JETLAG models, are widely use...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A recent model application has been developed by the Washington State Dept. of Ecology that simulates water circulation in South Puget Sound (SPS) using the Generalized Environmental Modeling System for Surface waters (GEMSS) with an open northern boundary near Edmonds, WA. Post-calibration root mean square errors (RMSEs) are <5% of Ehe tidal range...
Article
Full-text available
Nutrient enrichment of the South Umpqua River, Oregon was linked to periphyton growth and large diel fluctuations in dissolved oxygen and pH using the water quality model QUAL2Kw. The model was used to quantify nonpoint source loading, determine the pollutant of concern, estimate natural conditions, and calculate a phosphorus total maximum daily lo...
Article
QUAL2Kw is a framework for the simulation of water quality in streams and rivers. Dynamic diel heat budget and water quality kinetics are calculated for one-dimensional steady-flow systems. The framework includes a genetic algorithm to facilitate the calibration of the model in application to particular waterbodies. The genetic algorithm is used to...
Article
Full-text available
We evaluated an eleven year data set to assess trophic state and nutrient limitation in Lake Whatcom, an oligotrophic, soft water, chain lake located in the Puget Sound lowlands of Washington (U.S.A.). Although total phosphorus (TP) and soluble reactive phosphate (SRP) concentrations were relatively low throughout the lake, there were significant d...
Article
Phosphorus external and internal loading to Pine Lake was estimated and potential restoration measures were recommended. External sources contributed approximately 57 percent of the total phosphorus load, and internal sources the remaining 43 percent. External and internal loading together exceeded the critical level expected for a mesotrophic stat...
Article
Thesis (M.S.E.)--University of Washington, 1985. Includes bibliographical references (leaves [108]-112).

Projects

Projects (3)