Goran Jovanovic

Goran Jovanovic
Institute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering · Molecular Microbiology

PhD
Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) and novel antimicrobial agents, Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs), Bacteriocins

About

61
Publications
8,060
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1,797
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Introduction
Currently working on antimicrobial peptides affecting Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.
Additional affiliations
July 2020 - present
Institute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering
Position
  • Assistant Director, Research Professor
Description
  • Work on AMPs.
September 2017 - September 2019
Imperial College London
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • Work on AMPs and Bacteriophage
October 2015 - August 2019
Imperial College London
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Genes and Genomics
Education
September 1993 - April 1997
The Rockefeller University
Field of study
  • Biomedical Sciences
October 1987 - February 1990
University of Belgrade
Field of study
  • Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
October 1980 - January 1986
University of Belgrade
Field of study
  • Molecular Biology and Physiology

Publications

Publications (61)
Article
Aims: The aim of this study was to construct the improved pMAL expression vector in order to increase the efficacy of small native peptides purification and their clear-cut separation from MBP tag. The modifications we introduced can be applied to many expression vectors. Methods and results: To improve the pMAL expression vector we introduced t...
Preprint
Full-text available
Many protein expression and purification systems are commercially available to provide a sufficient amount of pure, soluble and active native protein, such as the pMAL system based on E. coli maltose binding protein tag (MBP). Adding specific amino acid tags to the N- or C-terminus of the protein increases solubility and facilitates affinity purifi...
Article
Full-text available
Transcription is fundamentally noisy, leading to significant heterogeneity across bacterial populations. Noise is often attributed to burstiness, but the underlying mechanisms and their dependence on the mode of promotor regulation remain unclear. Here, we measure E. coli single cell mRNA levels for two stress responses that depend on bacterial sig...
Article
Full-text available
The phage shock protein (Psp) response maintains integrity of the inner membrane (IM) in response to extracytoplasmic stress conditions and is widely distributed amongst enterobacteria. Its central component PspA, a member of the IM30 peripheral membrane protein family, acts as a major effector of the system through its direct association with the...
Article
Full-text available
This article describes reproducibility of a single-step automated β-galactosidase, and the equivalence of its data to the traditional assay (“Experiments in Molecular Genetics” [1]). This was done via a pairwise comparison of both methods using strains with Miller Unit [MU] values ranging from 0 to over 2000. The data presented in this article is a...
Chapter
Full-text available
Transcription regulation in a temporal and conditional manner underpins the lifecycle of enterobacterial pathogens. Upon exposure to a wide array of environmental cues, these pathogens modulate their gene expression via the RNA polymerase and associated sigma factors. Different sigma factors, either involved in general ‘house-keeping’ or specific r...
Article
Full-text available
Historically, the lacZ gene is one of the most universally used reporters of gene expression in molecular biology. Its activity can be quantified using an artificial substrate, o-nitrophenyl-ß-d-galactopyranoside (ONPG). However, the traditional method for measuring LacZ activity (first described by J. H. Miller in 1972) can be challenging for a la...
Article
Full-text available
Unlabelled: Phage shock protein A (PspA), which is responsible for maintaining inner membrane integrity under stress in enterobacteria, and vesicle-inducting protein in plastids 1 (Vipp1), which functions for membrane maintenance and thylakoid biogenesis in cyanobacteria and plants, are similar peripheral membrane-binding proteins. Their homologou...
Chapter
Successful gene regulation that governs the information flow from DNA underpins programs of differentiation and adaptation across all kingdoms of life. Transcription in bacteria is controlled by RNA polymerase containing the housekeeping sigma factor(s) or the alternative, e.g. sigma54 factor, its function being regulated via bacterial enhancer bin...
Article
Full-text available
Two-component systems play a central part in bacterial signal transduction. Phosphorelay mechanisms have been linked to more robust and ultra-sensitive signalling dynamics. The molecular machinery that facilitates such a signalling is, however, only understood in outline. In particular the functional relevance of the dimerization of a non-orthodox...
Article
Full-text available
The bacterial cell envelope retains a highly dense cytoplasm. The properties of the cytoplasm change with the metabolic state of the cell, the logarithmic phase (log) being highly active and the stationary phase metabolically much slower. Under the differing growth phases, many different types of stress mechanisms are activated in order to maintain...
Article
Full-text available
Two-component systems play a central part in bacterial signal transduction. Phosphorelay mechanisms have been linked to more robust and ultra-sensitive signalling dynamics. The molecular machinery that facilitates such a signalling is, however, only understood in outline. In particular the functional relevance of the dimerization of a non-orthodox...
Article
Full-text available
Here we describe approaches and methods to assaying in vitro the major variant bacterial sigma factor, Sigma 54 (σ(54)), in a purified system. We include the complete transcription system, binding interactions between σ54 and its activators, as well as the self-assembly and the critical ATPase activity of the cognate activators which serve to remod...
Article
Full-text available
All cell types must maintain the integrity of their membranes. The conserved bacterial membrane-associated protein PspA is major effector acting upon extracytoplasmic stress and is implicated in protection of the inner membrane of pathogens, formation of biofilms and multi-drug resistant persister cells. PspA and its homologues in Gram-positive bac...
Article
Full-text available
The phage-shock protein (Psp) system is believed to manage membrane stress in all Enterobacteriaceae and has recently emerged as being important for virulence in several pathogenic species of this phylum. The core of the Psp-system consists of the pspA-D operon and the distantly located pspG gene. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, it has...
Article
Full-text available
Bacterial enhancer-dependent transcription systems support major adaptive responses and offer a singular paradigm in gene control analogous to complex eukaryotic systems. Here we report new mechanistic insights into the control of one-membrane stress-responsive bacterial enhancer-dependent system. Using millisecond single-molecule fluorescence micr...
Data
Supplementary Figures S1-S9, Supplementary Table S1, Supplementary Methods and Supplementary References
Data
Full-text available
Petri Net Invariants for the Full Model. Table 1 and Table 2 show the P and T invariants of the full Petri net model shown in Figure 3.
Article
Full-text available
Bacteria have evolved a rich set of mechanisms for sensing and adapting to adverse conditions in their environment. These are crucial for their survival, which requires them to react to extracellular stresses such as heat shock, ethanol treatment or phage infection. Here we focus on studying the phage shock protein (Psp) stress response in Escheric...
Article
Full-text available
Phage shock proteins (Psp) and their homologues are found in species from the three domains of life: Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya (e.g. higher plants). In enterobacteria, the Psp response helps to maintain the proton motive force (PMF) of the cell when the inner membrane integrity is impaired. The presumed ability of ArcB to sense redox changes in...
Conference Paper
Background / Purpose: Phage shock protein (Psp) system in many Gram-negative bacteria responds to extracytoplasmic stresses that impair the inner membrane (IM) integrity. The IM-associated dual function protein PspA (PspA1-122; homologues found in all kingdoms of life) is a negative regulator and an effector of the Psp system implicated in virule...
Article
Full-text available
We report a general method based on wide-field fluorescence imaging of single molecule photobleaching and the Chung-Kennedy algorithm to measure the stoichiometry of functional protein complexes in living bacterial cells.
Article
Full-text available
Sensing the environment and responding appropriately to it are key capabilities for the survival of an organism. All extant organisms must have evolved suitable sensors, signaling systems, and response mechanisms allowing them to survive under the conditions they are likely to encounter. Here, we investigate in detail the evolutionary history of on...
Article
Full-text available
The phage-shock-protein (Psp) response maintains the proton-motive force (pmf) under extracytoplasmic stress conditions that impair the inner membrane (IM) in bacterial cells. In Escherichia coli transcription of the pspABCDE and pspG genes requires activation of σ(54)-RNA polymerase by the enhancer-binding protein PspF. A regulatory network compri...
Article
Full-text available
The bacterial phage shock protein (Psp) response functions to help cells manage the impacts of agents impairing cell membrane function. The system has relevance to biotechnology and to medicine. Originally discovered in Escherichia coli, Psp proteins and homologues are found in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, in archaea and in plants. Stu...
Article
Full-text available
To survive and colonise their various environments, including those used during infection, bacteria have developed a variety of adaptive systems. Amongst these is phage shock protein (Psp) response, which can be induced in Escherichia coli upon filamentous phage infection (specifically phage secretin pIV) and by other membrane-damaging agents. The...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of proteins is inseparably linked to their function. Because most biological processes involve a number of different proteins, it may become impossible to study the evolutionary properties of proteins in isolation. In the present article, we show how simple mechanistic models of biological processes can complement conventional compara...
Article
Full-text available
The phage shock protein (Psp) system found in enterobacteria is induced in response to impaired inner membrane integrity (where the Psp response is thought to help maintain the proton motive force of the cell) and is implicated in the virulence of pathogens such as Yersinia and Salmonella. We provided evidence that the two-component ArcAB system wa...
Article
Full-text available
The phage shock protein (Psp) response in Gram-negative bacteria counteracts membrane stress. Transcription of the PspF regulon (pspABCDE and pspG) in Escherichia coli is induced upon stresses that dissipate the proton motive force (pmf). Using GFP fusions we have visualized the subcellular localizations of PspA (a negative regulator and effector o...
Article
Full-text available
The phage shock protein (Psp) F regulon response in Escherichia coli is thought to be induced by impaired inner membrane integrity and an associated decrease in proton motive force (pmf). Mechanisms by which the Psp system detects the stress signal and responds have so far remained undetermined. Here we demonstrate that PspA and PspG directly confr...
Article
Full-text available
The region of the prtR gene coding for the active site of PrtR proteinase was detected in natural isolates of lactobacilli, previously determined as Lactobacillus rhamnosus. This region was present in all L. rhamnosus strains with proteolytic activity. The PCR primers used were constructed on the basis of the sequence of the catalytic domain of the...
Article
Full-text available
The phage shock protein operon (pspABCDE) of Escherichia coli is strongly up-regulated in response to overexpression of the filamentous phage secretin protein IV (pIV) and by many other stress conditions including defects in protein export. PspA has an established role in maintenance of the proton-motive force of the cell under stress conditions. H...
Article
Full-text available
The LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) CysB is a transcription factor in Escherichia coli cells, where as a homotetramer it binds the target promoter regions and activates the genes involved in sulphur utilization and sulphonate-sulphur metabolism, while negatively autoregulating its own transcription. The hslJ gene was found to be negative...
Article
Full-text available
A novel proteinase, PrtR, produced by the human vaginal isolate Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain BGT10 was identified and genetically characterized. The prtR gene and flanking regions were cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of PrtR shares characteristics that are common for other cell envelope proteinases (CEPs) characterized to da...
Article
Full-text available
The cysB gene product is a LysR-type regulatory protein required for expression of the cys regulon. cysB mutants of Escherichia coli and Salmonella, along with being auxotrophs for the cysteine, exhibit increased resistance to the antibiotics novobiocin (Nov) and mecillinam. In this work, by using lambdaplacMu9 insertions creating random lacZ fusio...
Article
Full-text available
In Eubacteria, expression of genes transcribed by an RNA polymerase holoenzyme containing the alternate sigma factor ς54 is positively regulated by proteins belonging to the family of enhancer-binding proteins (EBPs). These proteins bind to upstream activation sequences and are required for the initiation of transcription at the ς54-dependent promo...
Article
Full-text available
In previous studies we demonstrated that mutations in the genes cysB, cysE, and cls (nov) affect resistance of Escherichia coli to novobiocin (J. Rakonjac, M. Milic, and D. J. Savic, Mol. Gen. Genet. 228:307–311, 1991; R. Ivanisevic, M. Milic, D. Ajdic, J. Rakonjac, and D. J. Savic, J. Bacteriol. 177:1766–1771, 1995). In this work we expand this li...
Article
Transcription of the phage-shock protein (psp) operon in Escherichia coli is driven by a σ54 promoter, stimulated by integration host factor and dependent on an upstream, cis-acting sequence and an activator protein, PspF. PspF belongs to the enhancer binding protein family but lacks an N-terminal regulatory domain. Purified PspF is not modified an...
Article
Full-text available
PspF, the transcriptional activator of the pspA operon of Escherichia coli, which belongs to the enhancer binding protein (EBP) family of σ54 activator proteins, is constitutively active in an in vitro transcription assay. PspF protein, together with RNA polymerase holoenzyme containing σ54, is required for in vitro transcription from the pspA prom...
Article
We describe the use of transcriptional fusions to the phage shock protein (psp) promoter. These fusions are expressed only when cells are infected by filamentous phage. In an application, the psp promoter was fused to the protein coding part of filamentous phage gene III (gIII). Protein III (pIII) is needed to complement mutant f1 phage containing...
Article
Full-text available
PspF bound to the psp enhancer activates E sigma54 holoenzyme-dependent transcription of the Escherichia coli phage-shock protein (psp) operon and autogenously represses its own sigma70-dependent transcription, thereby keeping its concentration at a low level. It has been demonstrated previously that integration host factor (IHF) bound to a DNA sit...
Article
Full-text available
Escherichia coli sigma54-dependent phage shock protein operon (pspA to -E) transcription is under the control of PspF, a constitutively active activator. Sigma70-dependent transcription of pspF is under autogenous control by wild-type PspF but not by a DNA-binding mutant, PspF deltaHTH. Negative autoregulation of PspF is continual and not affected...
Article
Full-text available
The sequence (2,700 bp) between the aldH and pspF genes of Escherichia coli was determined. The pspF gene encodes a sigma54 transcriptional activator of the phage shock protein (psp) operon (pspA to pspE). Downstream of the pspF transcribed region are two open reading frames (ORFs), ordL and goaG, convergently oriented with respect to pspF. These t...
Article
Full-text available
The phage-shock-protein (psp) operon helps to ensure survival of Escherichia coli in late stationary phase at alkaline pH, and protects the cell against dissipation of its proton-motive force against challenge. It is strongly induced by filamentous phage pIV and its bacterial homologues, and by mutant porins that don't localize properly, as well as...
Article
Full-text available
The phage shock protein (psp) operon (pspABCE) of Escherichia coli is strongly induced in response to a variety of stressful conditions or agents such as filamentous phage infection, ethanol treatment, osmotic shock, heat shock, and prolonged incubation in stationary phase. Transcription of the psp operon is driven from a sigma54 promoter and stimu...
Article
Full-text available
We report on a significant difference between the published nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli K12 histidine operon and our sequencing results repeatedly obtained from a number of different E. coli K12 strains. The discrepancies include 39 base-pair changes and one addition located predominantly in the proximal portion of the operon. Our d...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents the first detailed structural analysis of termini of an inversion mediated by recombination between Escherichia coli native IS elements. The complete nucleotide sequence of the inversion termini in the lactose region of Escherichia coli K-12 confirms our previous suggestion that the inversion occurred by homologous recombination...