Glenn Shea

Glenn Shea
The University of Sydney · Faculty of Veterinary Science

About

122
Publications
43,921
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1,986
Citations
Citations since 2017
40 Research Items
1100 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250

Publications

Publications (122)
Article
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Context. Skinks comprise the dominant component of the terrestrial vertebrate fauna in Oceania, New Guinea, and Eastern Wallacea (ONGEW). However, knowledge of their diversity is incomplete, and their conservation needs are poorly understood. Aims. To explore the diversity and threat status of the skinks of ONGEW and identify knowledge gaps and con...
Article
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Viviparity has evolved more times in squamates than in any other vertebrate group; therefore, squamates offer an excellent model system in which to study the patterns, drivers and implications of reproductive mode evolution. Based on current species distributions, we examined three selective forces hypothesized to drive the evolution of squamate vi...
Article
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Comprehensive assessments of species’ extinction risks have documented the extinction crisis and underpinned strategies for reducing those risks. Global assessments reveal that, among tetrapods, 40.7% of amphibians, 25.4% of mammals and 13.6% of birds are threatened with extinction. Because global assessments have been lacking, reptiles have been o...
Article
Full-text available
Comprehensive assessments of species’ extinction risks have documented the extinction crisis and underpinned strategies for reducing those risks. Global assessments reveal that, among tetrapods, 40.7% of amphibians, 25.4% of mammals and 13.6% of birds are threatened with extinction. Because global assessments have been lacking, reptiles have been o...
Article
Full-text available
Many animals have strict diel activity patterns, with unique adaptations for either diurnal or nocturnal activity. Diel activity is phylogenetically conserved, yet evolutionary shifts in diel activity occur and lead to important changes in an organism's morphology, physiology, and behaviour. We use phylogenetic comparative methods to examine the ev...
Article
The purpose of the present application, under Articles 74.1.1 and 81.1 of the Code, is to maintain consistent usage of the commonly used name Emoia nigra (Hombron & Jacquinot, 1853) by setting aside a lectotype designation for Gongylus (Eumeces) freycineti Duméril & Bibron, 1839 by Wells & Wellington in 1985 in favour of a later lectotype designati...
Article
The bleating tree frog (Litoria dentata) is one of the more prominent pelodryadid frogs of eastern Australia by virtue of its extremely loud, piercing, male advertisement call. A member of the Litoria rubella species group, L. dentata has a broad latitudinal distribution and is widespread from coastal and subcoastal lowlands through to montane area...
Article
The modern classification of skinks is based on a nomenclature that dates to the 1970s. However, there are a number of earlier names in the family group that have been overlooked by recent workers. These names are identified and their validity with respect to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature investigated, along with their type gene...
Article
Geographic range size varies greatly across species. Climate, along with aspects of a species’ biology, may influence its spatial extent. We investigate intrinsic and extrinsic predictors of range size in Australian skinks. We predicted that larger body size, longer limbs, and larger clutch sizes would be associated with larger ranges, and that ran...
Article
The twelve generic names proposed by Cope in 1892, which were created without included species, are linked to existing taxa by recognition that Cope’s key is a simple modification of the previous skink generic key by Boulenger in 1887, splitting existing genera of Boulenger in accordance with the morphology of the species included in those genera....
Article
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available at https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/200972722/1533318
Article
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Global biodiversity loss is a profound consequence of human activity. Disturbingly, biodiversity loss is greater than realized because of the unknown number of undocumented species. Conservation fundamentally relies on taxonomic recognition of species, but only a fraction of biodiversity is described. Here, we provide a new quantitative approach fo...
Article
Our knowledge of the conservation status of reptiles, the most diverse class of terrestrial vertebrates, has improved dramatically over the past decade, but still lags behind that of the other tetrapod groups. Here, we conduct the first comprehensive evaluation (~92% of the world's ~1714 described species) of the conservation 1 Joint senior authors...
Article
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This article reports on the results of a survey of racehorse trainers (n = 112) outlining the reasons for tongue-tie (TT) and noseband (NB) use by Thoroughbred trainers (TBTs) (n = 72) and Standardbred trainers (SBTs) (n = 40). The study also investigated the reported effectiveness of TTs and possible complications arising from their use. Tongue-ti...
Article
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In their careful analysis of python phylogeny and evolution, Esquerré et al. (2020) proposed the new genus-series nomen Nawaran for the Oenpelli python, Simalia oenpelliensis (Gow, 1977). However, Nawaran is a junior synonym of Nyctophilopython Wells & Wellington, 1985, a name that was validly, though controversially, published in compliance with t...
Article
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Australia hosts approximately 10% of the world's reptile species, the largest number of any country. Despite this and evidence of widespread decline, the first comprehensive assessment of the conservation status of Australian terrestrial squamates (snakes and lizards) was undertaken only recently. Here we apply structured expert elicitation to the...
Article
Aim Clutch size is a key life‐history trait. In lizards, it ranges over two orders of magnitude. The global drivers of spatial and phylogenetic variation in clutch have been extensively studied in birds, but such tests in other organisms are lacking. To test the generality of latitudinal gradients in clutch size, and their putative drivers, we pres...
Article
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The identity of Chelodina oblonga has been unclear because it has been variously defined to include populations of snake-necked chelid turtle from the southwest of Western Australia, across northern Australia, Cape York and southern New Guinea in its broadest conception, from just the northern part of this range (northern Australia and New Guinea),...
Article
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This article reports on the results of a survey designed to explore the types of nosebands that owners, riders and trainers use in training and competition, their reasons for using nosebands, the design preferences in different disciplines and approaches to noseband tightness and monitoring, as well as the incidence of negative impacts related to n...
Article
Almost a century ago, the Swiss herpetologist Jean Roux described a new skink species, Mabuia wirzi, from a single specimen from Pulau Nias, an island on the west coast of Sumatra in Indonesia (Roux 1925). The specimen was part of a small collection of reptiles and amphibians made on Nias by the ethnologist Paul Wirz (29.v.1892–1955.i.30), who work...
Article
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We present information on primary type specimens for 13,282 species and subspecies of reptiles compiled in the Reptile Database, that is, holotypes, neotypes, lectotypes, and syntypes. These represent 99.4% of all 13,361 currently recognized taxa (11,050 species and 2311 subspecies). Type specimens of 653 taxa (4.9%) are either lost or not located,...
Book
Lizards and snakes (squamate reptiles) are the most diverse vertebrate group in Australia, with approximately 1000 described species, representing about 10% of the global squamate diversity. Squamates are a vital part of the Australian ecosystem, but their conservation has been hindered by a lack of knowledge of their diversity, distribution, biolo...
Article
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Aim To develop a robust phylogeny for the iconic Australian water skinks (Eulamprus) and to explore the influence of landscape evolution of eastern Australia on phylogeographic patterns. Location Eastern and south‐eastern Australia. Methods We used Sanger methods to sequence a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) locus for 386 individuals across the five Eu...
Article
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The types and type localities of Bombinator australis Gray, 1835, Pseudophryne bibronii Günther, 1859, and Phryniscus albifrons Duméril, Bibron & Duméril, 1854, are defined. The nominal type locality for B. australis, Swan River, is considered to be in error. The source of the specimen, Joseph Wright, owned property in the Swan River colony in West...
Article
Restrictive nosebands are of growing concern because of their potential impact on equine welfare. This study evaluates archived radiographs of equine nasal bones for evidence of trauma and to test whether age, sex or breed were risk factors for such radiographic changes. Radiographs of equine nasal bones (n=60) were studied for evidence of bony or...
Conference Paper
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Restrictive nosebands are of growing concern because of their putative impact on equine welfare. An informal system for gauging noseband tightness has been to check if one can fit two fingers between the noseband and the horse's nose. In 2012 the International Society for Equitation Science (ISES) developed a taper gauge to measure this space and s...
Article
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Aim: Small geographic ranges make species especially prone to extinction from anthropogenic disturbances or natural stochastic events. We assemble and analyse a comprehensive dataset of all the world's lizard species and identify the species with the smallest ranges—those known only from their type localities. We compare them to wide-ranging specie...
Chapter
Knowledge of the New Zealand lizards began with the arrival of the Māori in the thirteenth century, who largely applied their ancestral Polynesian names and attitudes to lizards. These relied heavily on mythology and folklore. The first European discoverers in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries noted the presence of lizards without provi...
Article
The previously recognised original description of Crocodilus johnsoni Krefft, 1873 in the Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London is antedated by several months by a newspaper article penned by Krefft, in which the species is named as Crocodilus johnsonii. The same article validates the name Tomistoma krefftii, previously considered a nomen...
Article
The New Guinea scincid lizard Emoia ahli (Vogt, 1932), described from two specimens from the Sepik River in New Guinea, is shown to be indistinguishable from Emoia battersbyi (Procter, 1923), a species from the same region, based on the first examination of the syntypes since the description of the species. Several of the diagnostic characters that...
Article
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Recent genetic studies have identified the New Caledonian scincid genus Lioscincus to be polyphyletic, comprising four distinct evolutionary lineages which we recognize at the generic level. The revised concept of Lioscincus s.s. now includes only the type species Lioscincus steindachneri Bocage, 1873 and the recently described Lioscincus vivae Sad...
Article
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Anilios fossor sp. nov. is described from a single specimen collected in 1989 from Ruby Gap Nature Park, Northern Ter-ritory. The species differs from all other Anilios species in the combination of 20 midbody scales, 514 dorsal scales, a rounded, non-Angulate snout in lateral and dorsal profile, a nasal cleft contacting the second supralabial and...
Article
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Most of the reproductive modes of frogs include an exotrophic tadpole, but a number of taxa have some form of endotrophic development that lacks a feeding tadpole stage. The dicroglossid frog genus Limnonectes ranges from China south into Indonesia. The breeding biologies of the approximately 60 described species display an unusual diversity that r...
Article
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The foundation of the Australian Society of Herpetologists in 1964 occurred at a time of change in Australian herpetology, as university-based herpetological studies began to spread, both within and between institutions, and a new generation of museum researchers was employed. The Society's foundation can be traced to a single lineage of anuran res...
Article
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Lacertoides pardalis est un scinque endémique de grande taille, caractérisé par de petites écailles sur tout le corps. Cette espèce a été décrite pour la première fois en 1997, à partir de 2 spécimens en provenance d’un unique site de récolte, dans l’extrême sud de la Grande Terre. Depuis la description originale, il y a une dizaine d’année, plusie...
Article
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Effective and targeted conservation action requires detailed information about species, their distribution, systematics and ecology as well as the distribution of threat processes which affect them. Knowledge of reptilian diversity remains surprisingly disparate, and innovative means of gaining rapid insight into the status of reptiles are needed i...
Article
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The type series of Lygosoma melanopogon Duméril and Bibron 1839, the type species of the scincid lizard genus Sphenomorphus Fitzinger 1843, consists of four specimens representing three species, all of which have available junior synonyms. A lectotype is designated, and Lygosoma melanopogon becomes a senior synonym of Lygosoma florense Weber 1891 (...
Article
The Eastern Water Dragon is a large, conspicuous agamid, well known to many inhabitants of eastern Australia. It was first described in the scientific literature as Lophura lesueurii by Gray (1831). Gray’s allocation of this taxon to his earlier genus Lophura Gray, 1827, created for the species Lacerta lophura Shaw, 1802, does not mention that Cuvi...
Article
A new species of diplodactylid gecko, Bavayia nubila Bauer, Sadlier, Jackman & Shea, n. sp., is described from forests at two sites in the drainage of the Tontouta Valley in the ultramafic ranges of southeastern New Caledonia. The new gecko is the sister species of the much smaller Bavayia goroensis; both species are basal within the B. cyclura cla...
Article
James Ramsay (22 Dec 1838-7 Oct 1913), elder brother of the zoologist and Australian Museum curator Edward Pierson Ramsay, was an important figure in Australian herpetological history, his collections being among the earliest from western New South Wales. Ramsay was based sequentially on five properties: Cardington (ca 1860-1868), Nanama and Merool...
Article
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The gekkonid lizard genus Cyrtodactylus in Australia is revised based on a combination of morphology and mitochondrial (ND2) sequence data. Previous hypotheses that the Australian populations are assignable to a New Guinea species, C. louisiadensis, or to a Cyrtodactylus louisiadensis species group defined on shared colour pattern and enlarged subc...
Chapter
At the time of European settlement, the terrestrial reptile fauna of the Sydney metropolitan area, west and north to the Hawkesbury-Nepean River, consisted of 45 species, based on Australian Museum records, although most regions had between 30-36 species. Skinks and elapid snakes dominated the fauna, with progressively fewer agamid and gekkonid liz...
Article
Lygosoma nototaenia Boulenger, 1914, and Lygosoma albodorsale Vogt, 1932, previously placed in the genus Sphenomorphus, are redescribed from the three known specimens of each (including two new specimens of the latter species) and transferred to the genus Lipinia. The phenotypically similar genus Scincella is distinguished from Lipinia by an apomor...
Article
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Human activities affect animal populations whenever animals and humans live in close proximity, but patterns of mortality in urban wildlife remain poorly known. We analyzed rates of injury and mortality of bluetongue lizards (Tiliqua scincoides) in Sydney, Australia, using a Wildlife Information and Rescue Service database that contained more than...
Article
Reproductive cycles and patterns of sperm storage were examined for three regionally sympatric species of cold-temperate viviparous Australian skinks previously reported to have Type II reproductive cycles (autumn spermatogenesis and mating, with oviductal sperm storage (OSS) and spring ovulation). Histological examination of oviducts, testes and e...
Article
Tropidoscincus variabilis is a medium-sized, long-limbed and long-tailed skink from New Caledonia with strong ontogenetic change in coloration, juveniles being very brightly coloured. It is primarily an inhabitant of forested habitats, but also occurs in maquis heathlands. Mature females are similar in size to mature males, but have proportionally...
Article
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The Saltuarius swaini lineage comprises four species: S. swaini (Wells & Wellington, 1985), S. wyberba (Couper et al., 1997), S. moritzi n.sp. and S. kateae n.sp. These are diagnosed by scalation and colour pattern differences; high levels of discrimination between these species were obtained in genetic and multivariate morphological analyses. Two...
Article
A complete catalogue is provided of the type-specimens of the scincid lizards in the herpetological collections of the Museum für Naturkunde der Humboldt-Universitat zu Berlin (ZMB). The collection includes 519 type specimens, representing 195 named taxa (120 of which are currently regarded as valid). Among the most historically important types are...
Article
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A new species of diplodactylid genus Bavayia, B. goroensis, is described from the Plaine des Lacs region of the Province Sud, New Caledonia. The new gecko is the smallest member of the Bavayia cyclura clade (49 mm snout-vent length) and, based on a molecular phylogeny, is basal within this group. It differs from other members of this group in its m...
Article
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Demansia olivacea and Demansia torquata, as used by recent authors, are composite. Nine species are recognized based on coloration and morphology, with evidence of sympatry between several pairs of species. Demansia olivacea is restricted to the northern Kimberley and the Top End of the Northern Territory and D. torquata to eastern coastal Queensla...
Article
A catalogue of the amphibian and reptile type specimens in the collections of the Papua New Guinea National Museum and University of Papua New Guinea is provided, with collection data obtained from the registers of each collection, and comments on the current condition and whereabouts of the type specimens and discrepancies between data from differ...
Article
Diets of Tiliqua multifasciata and Tiliqua ocdpitalis were studied by examination of stomach contents of 14 and 16 preserved individuals in the collection of the Western Australian Museum. Both species are active foraging omnivores, feeding mostly on diurnally available food. Most stomachs contained plant material, with lower frequencies of arthrop...
Article
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A Spiny-tailed gecko, Strophurus krisalys sp. nov., is described from inland areas of Queensland and coastal and near coastal areas in the Gulf of Carpentaria. It has blue mouth colour, enlarged spines above the eye, and parallel rows of enlarged, and uniformly coloured tail spines. In these characteristics it is most similar in morphology to Strop...
Article
The postsupraocular, a small oblique scale just posterior to the supraoculars and medial to the pretemporal scales, is a derived character within the taxonomically difficult Sphenomorphus group of lygosomine skinks. This character occurs in 22 of the approximately 125 described species of Sphenomorphus currently recognized. The species with this di...
Article
The overlap pattern between the upper and lower secondary temporal scales is an important systematic character in sphenomorphine skinks. The derived condition of the lower secondary temoral overlapping the upper secondary temporal concords with certain aspects of existing taxonomy, geography, and ecology. Partly on the basis of this character, the...
Article
Lygosoma nototaenia Boulenger, 1914, and Lygosoma albodorsale Vogt 1932, previously placed in the genus Sphenomorphus, are redescribed from the three known specimens of each (including two new specimens of the latter species) and transferred to the genus Lipinia. The phenotypically similar genus Scincella is distinguished from Lipinia by an apomorp...
Article
Full-text available
The original illustration and descriptions of Phyllurus milii Bory de Saint Vincent, 1823 are most likely to be based on Nephrurus levis occidentalis Storr, 1963, not the species to which the name milii has been consistently applied for nearly 180 years. In the absence of types, a neotype (WAM R34085) is designated, representing the species to whic...
Article
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To investigate possible causes of embryonic and neonatal mortality in a group of captive Fijian iguanas (Brachylophus fasciatus and Brachylophus vitiensis), the vitamin D status of adults in the colony was compared with that of agamid and iguanid lizards either housed in indoor enclosures under artificial ultraviolet light or exposed to natural sun...
Article
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Although most species of large reptiles in the Sydney region are now restricted to remnant bushland, the blue-tongued lizard (Tiliqua scincoides) remains abundant. How has this large, slow-moving reptile managed to persist in the suburbs? We implanted radio-transmitters into 17 adult blue-tongued lizards and tracked them for six months (October 199...
Article
Spermatogenesis in the southern Australian blindsnake Ramphotyphlops nigrescens is seasonal, with sperm production peaking in autumn, reduced in spring, and testicular recrudescence occurring from late spring to summer. Sperm is present in the epididymides from autumn to early summer. The retrocloacal sacs in this species do not function as sperm s...
Article
Lygosoma unlineatum de Rooij 1915 is a large New Guinea skink known from five specimens. It was previously associated with taxa now considered to be in the Sphenomorphus group of lygosomine skinks. However, it is a member of the Eugongylus group of lygosomines, best placed in the relatively primitive genus Eugongylus. Within the Eugongylus group, t...
Article
The identification of dangerous Australian snakes is important in instituting therapy for envenomation. Despite the availability of a number of identification guides with varying degrees of generality, identification can be problematic for several reasons. These include a diversity of common names, many of which are inappropriate or regionally appl...
Article
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Ramphotyphlopsbecki (Tanner, 1948), restricted to Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, is resurrected from the synonymy of Ramphotyphlops willeyi (Boulenger, 1900), from the Loyalty Islands, on the basis of consistent differ­ ences in external morphology and visceral anatomy. New records of Ramphoty­ phlops braminus (Daudin, 1803) are reported from Vanuat...
Article
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Manuscript descriptions of several species of reptiles prepa red in 1777 by William Anderson, naturalist on James Cook's third voyage of discovery, are reported and, where possible, identified. The most thorough description is of the Blotched Bluetongue, Tiliqua nigrolutea, based on a specimen collected from Adventure Bay, Bruny Island, and painted...
Article
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The external morphology and osteology of the Land Mullet Egernia major is described based on ail available material in Australian museum collections and extant type material. The complex nomenclatural history of this species is discussed. Multivariate analysis of variation in external morphology does not identify any segment of the geographic distr...
Article
The majority of the 542 typhlopid specimens examined by Edgar Waite for his 1918 monograph of the family are identified, and their current status discussed. Most Waite records that do not correspond with the distribution based on modern records are shown to be in error, involving either misidentifications, misreadings of localities, or transpositio...