Glenn E. King

Glenn E. King
Monmouth University · Department of History and Anthropology

Ph.D. in Anthropology
In preparation: Book about perspectives on early hominin ecology and behavior from studies of baboons (Papio).

About

28
Publications
6,666
Reads
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108
Citations
Citations since 2017
5 Research Items
18 Citations
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Introduction
I was trained in anthropology (4-field approach at Cornell and UCLA) and primatology (UC Berkeley). I have researched free-ranging common baboons in Africa; captive chimpanzees at Holloman AFB; and hamadryas, geladas, and mandrills in the Los Angeles Zoo. My recent primate behavior text emphasizes relevance to understanding the evolution of human behavior (Routledge). I recently published an entry in the Encyclopedia of Animal Cognition and Behavior.
Additional affiliations
January 1980 - June 2008
Monmouth University
Position
  • Professor Emeritus
Education
September 1970 - June 1972
University of California, Berkeley
Field of study
  • Anthropology/Primatology

Publications

Publications (28)
Book
Full-text available
This comprehensive introduction demonstrates the theoretical perspectives and concepts that are applied to primate behavior, and explores the relevance of non-human primates to understanding human behavior. Using a streamlined and student-friendly taxonomic framework, King provides a thorough overview of the primate order. The chapters cover common...
Article
Full-text available
For more than 70 y researchers have looked to baboons (monkeys of the genus Papio ) as a source of hypotheses about the ecology and behavior of early hominins (early human ancestors and their close relatives). This approach has undergone a resurgence in the last decade as a result of rapidly increasing knowledge from experimental and field studies...
Presentation
Full-text available
This manuscript describes a personal experience: my empathetic interaction with a captive chimpanzee injured in a beating by other chimpanzees. THE FINAL PARAGRAPH OF THE ESSAY HAS BEEN RELEGATED TO "VIEW FILE." PLEASE DO.
Preprint
Full-text available
This paper reports a brief observation of unusual chimpanzee behavior and places it in the context of a small body of evidence that suggests a phylogenetic connection between chimpanzees and humans. Specifically, coordinated rhythmic behavior may be a social adaptation in both species. A propensity for such behavior has been hypothesized as a facto...
Article
Full-text available
Published in the Human Ethology Bulletin 12(1). March 1997
Preprint
This paper discusses primate models for early hominin behavioral evolution and reviews some important examples in ecology, technology, social life, and communication. It was prepared for the "Cambridge Handbook of Evolutionary Perspectives on Human Behavior."
Article
Full-text available
Objections to baboon analogies for early hominin behavior fall into two categories: absolutist and relativist. These are examined in detail. It is concluded that (1) there is no good reason for categorical exclusion of baboon data from hominin models, and (2) alternative sources of information are better for some purposes but not all.
Article
Full-text available
The relative significance and specific roles of innate components are matters for specific research rather than broad assumptions. Primate responses to snakes provide a key example. Observations and experiments in field and captivity have yielded evidence for both innate and learning interpretations. This comparative study surveys the literature fo...
Article
The craniocervical bite is a mode of predatory attack, directed to the head and/or neck of certain prey, that is prominent in many primates. Evidence reviewed here indicates that chimpanzees and some baboons are more like other primates in this regard than was previously known.
Article
Full-text available
Between 1300 and 1500 CE Swiss military infantry units achieved virtually unique success in their coordinated use of pikes as weapons. This can be explained by coordination of historical and sociobiological factors. The key to the latter is kin selection.
Book
Publisher's blurb: This uniquely broad survey reconstructs the nonwestern world as it was before the main onslaught of European imperialism. It offers a systematic overview rather than an idiosyncratic selection of particular cultures. The author minimizes redundancy with a scheme of nested cultural units he calls Domains, Zones, and Areas. Having...
Article
Full-text available
Comparison of sportive line fighting in humans with inter-community group displays in chimpanzees leads to the hypothesis of a shared innate mechanism that generates pleasurable excitement in response to aggressive group confrontations that present little danger. It is suggested that the original adaptive function of this mechanism was territorial...
Data
It is proposed that chimpanzee responses to felid predators are mediated by an attentional mechanism, perhaps a mental template of the facial configuration of cats. The hypothesis is based on field evidence that chimpanzees respond strongly to a variety of cats in circumstances where there is little or no immediate danger. [This is an unpublished a...
Article
New evidence is presented in support of the previously published view that a killing bite to the head and/or neck is an important feature of primate predatory behavior. Evidence for this bite in Papio cynocephalus and three other species is augmented. In addition, the craniocervical bite is newly documented in three genera and eight species. A vari...
Article
Full-text available
A common approach to the reconstruction of early hominid behavior is the comparative study of living species. Some practitioners of this approach have strongly emphasized the use of carnivores while others have argued for the exclusive use of nonhuman primates. This paper takes the position that the interrelationship of primate and carnivore studie...
Article
Full-text available
It is argued that systematic ethological study of primate predatory behavior, neglected to date, is possible and potentially valuable. The point is made through an investigation of a particular predatory motor pattern. The craniocervical bite is a killing bite directed toward the head and]or neck of the prey. It is widespread among a variety of pre...
Article
Full-text available
Comparative study of social carnivores is a source of ideas about hominin behavior during the earlier stages of adaptation to cooperative hunting. This paper supports and expands a theory previously presented, i.e. social units of hyenas, lions, and wolves share several key features, including varying degrees of fission-fusion. Evidence is presente...
Article
Full-text available
A survey of recent data on the socio-territorial organization of primates, carnivores and human hunter-gatherers discloses some striking simi-laritica among them. These common features are integrated into a theory of hominid social evolution. It is postulated that the hominids, throughout most of their evolution, were organized into stable groups w...
Article
Full-text available
It is argued that one form of socioterritorial organization is most common among the larger social carnivores and may be optimal under most conditions. This form of organization is based on a stable territorial group with fission-fusion capacity. The importance of such a unit among hyenas, lions, and wolves is documented. By analogy, the earliest h...

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