Glenn Fox

Glenn Fox
University of Southern California | USC · Performance Science Institute

PhD

About

14
Publications
2,168
Reads
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361
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - May 2017
University of Southern California
Position
  • Head of Department

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Gratitude is a complex emotional feeling associated with universally desirable positive effects in personal, social, and physiological domains. Why or how gratitude achieves these functional outcomes is not clear. Toward the goal of identifying its' underlying physiological processes, we recently investigated the neural correlates of gratitude. In...
Article
Full-text available
When someone holds a door for us we often respond with a verbal "thanks." But given such a trivial favor, our feelings can vary considerably depending on how the door is held. Studies have shown that verbal thanking increases in relation to door-holding effort. However, it is unclear how such a favor can lead to verbal thanks in addition to recipro...
Article
Full-text available
Gratitude is an important aspect of human sociality, and is valued by religions and moral philosophies. It has been established that gratitude leads to benefits for both mental health and interpersonal relationships. It is thus important to elucidate the neurobiological correlates of gratitude, which are only now beginning to be investigated. To th...
Article
Full-text available
How does witnessing a hateful person in pain compare to witnessing a likable person in pain? The current study compared the brain bases for how we perceive likable people in pain with those of viewing hateful people in pain. While social bonds are built through sharing the plight and pain of others in the name of empathy, viewing a hateful person i...
Article
Full-text available
Observing someone perform an action engages brain regions involved in motor planning, such as the inferior frontal, premotor, and inferior parietal cortices. Recent research suggests that during action observation, activity in these neural regions can be modulated by membership in an ethnic group defined by physical differences. In this study we ex...
Data
Relationship between ethnicity scores and searchlight peak accuracy values from vPMC. Correlation conducted across subjects, r = .46, p>.05, n = 15. (TIF)
Data
Whole-brain univariate analysis for all action versus rest. Differences in whole-brain activation while watching all action clips compared with rest condition (Action Observation > Rest) are displayed. Results are displayed at p<0.05 (FDR corrected). (TIF)
Data
Region of Interest Classification Accuracies. (DOCX)
Data
Individual subject searchlight accuracy maps for Action Like-Action Dislike classification. Crosshair is located in the vPMC cluster that was significant at the group level. All individual subject maps are warped into MNI space, and thresholded so that only regions showing above chance classification (greater than 50%) are shown. (TIF)
Data
Relationship between ethnicity scores and peak accuracy values for the right IPL. Correlation conducted across subjects during the 4-class discrimination, r = .55, p<.05, n = 15. (TIF)
Article
Full-text available
The "articulatory loop" for rehearsal of verbal materials in working memory has been shown not to be a unique hard-wired structure associated with spoken language. Specifically, a parallel rehearsal process for sign language occurs in fluent signers. Here we show that the same rehearsal process can occur for unfamiliar, nonmeaningful body movements...
Article
Full-text available
The development of skilled reading requires efficient communication between distributed brain regions. By using diffusion tensor imaging, we assessed the interhemispheric connections in a group of children with a wide range of reading abilities. We segmented the callosal fibers into regions based on their likely cortical projection zones, and we me...

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