Glen Cousquer

Glen Cousquer
The University of Edinburgh | UoE · Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies

BSc(Hons) BVM&S CertZooMed PGDOE MSc MSc PhD MRCVS

About

46
Publications
4,535
Reads
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214
Citations

Publications

Publications (46)
Article
Full-text available
This article will explore the kestrel’s remarkable biology and ecology before considering and trying to make sense of some of the factors that have contributed to this bird’s changing fortunes.
Article
Full-text available
A field report of sap feeding in nuthatches
Article
Full-text available
The hills of San Francisco, on which this famous city sprang up and has grown, have witnessed both the coming and going of working equines. Whilst the kind of horsepower that might first spring to mind is under the bonnet of Steve McQueen’s Ford Mustang in the 1968 film Bullitt, the city has also known other forms of horsepower. This article will e...
Thesis
The emergence of the mule’s role as a beast of burden working in mountain tourism is founded on our appreciation of this species’ great attributes as a means of transport in the mountain environment. Our appreciation of mules does not always extend to their care and welfare. This is particularly true of the mountain tourism industry in Morocco, whe...
Chapter
This book addresses the issue of animal welfare within the tourism experience. Part I of the book provides a conceptual and historical foundation upon which to analyse animal welfare and the position of animals in tourism, and how these two issues intersect. Part II consists of 14 opinion pieces that discuss various issues associated with animal we...
Article
THIS series gives readers the opportunity to consider and contribute to discussion of some of the ethical dilemmas that can arise in veterinary practice. Each month, a case scenario is presented, followed by discussion of some of the issues involved. In addition, a possible way forward is suggested; however, there is rarely a cut-anddried answer in...
Article
Full-text available
Glen Cousquer discusses how wolves have been viewed historically and culturally and how this influences plans today for their reintroduction.
Article
Full-text available
Mountain Guides and International Mountain Leaders (IMLs) have achieved cross-border recognition of their professional awards. This allows them to work internationally and provides a rare example of an established, state-sanctioned and respected professional group operating within the tourism industry. As it grows, this industry is increasingly loo...
Article
THIS series gives readers the opportunity to consider and contribute to discussion of some of the ethical dilemmas that can arise in veterinary practice. Each month, a case scenario is presented, followed by discussion of some of the issues involved. In addition, a possible way forward is suggested; however, there is rarely a cut-and-dried answer i...
Article
Full-text available
THE ibex (Capra ibex ibex) is considered by many to be the emblematic animal of the Alps. Its agility, grace and poise over steep, rocky ter-rain, together with its relative approachability and result-ing familiarity, have earned it a place in the hearts and minds of mountaineers, nat-uralists and all those who have had the good fortune to encounte...
Article
The dilemma in the October issue involved an injured female grey squirrel and her offspring, which were brought to your practice. While the mother had to be humanely euthanased, the question remained of what to do with the kits. A nurse was eager to hand-rear them but you were also aware that grey squirrels are considered a destructive, non-native...
Article
An adult female grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) is brought into your veterinary practice together with her unweaned young after their drey was, apparently, blown from a tree. The member of the public who found the squirrels only did so because her dog caught and injured the mother. A brief clinical examination found the mother to be distressed...
Article
Full-text available
Veterinary Times PACK mules play an essential role in mountain tourism and agriculture in the High Atlas of Morocco and contrib-ute significantly to the local rural economy. Harness sores and injuries are a common health problem with significant welfare implica-tions in these remote areas (Sells et al, 2010; Cousquer, 2011). Tethering injuries are...
Article
Full-text available
Your manager reprimands you for including details of a newly identified condition in the clinical notes of a client's dog. The client has very recently taken out pet insurance and thus risks being refused cover for the investigations and treatment you are proposing. This is a long-standing client with limited means. Your manager suggests that you o...
Article
Full-text available
Profit incentive schemes are becoming increasingly common in veterinary practice and as the principal of a small animal practice you are considering this approach for your employees. You have had some preliminary discussions with your employees, some of whom are unsure about how such a scheme would affect the way they perform their duties. Can prof...
Article
Full-text available
THE Three Tenors held their audience captive. Their chests puffed out, they strutted and paced backwards and for-wards, each striving, or so it appeared, to outdo the other. Pavarotti, his face a crimson scarlet, was fl anked by Carreras to his left and Domingo to his right. No sooner had he thrown down a few defiant bars than the challenge would b...
Article
INJURIES to the anterior segment of the eyes are commonly seen in free-living tawny owls ( Strix aluco ) admitted to wildlife rehabilitation centres. Pathology affecting only the surface of the eye was reported in almost 25 per cent of adult free-living tawny owls that received an ophthalmological
Article
ESSENTIALS OF AVIAN MEDICINE AND SURGERY, 3rd edn Brian H. Coles. 392 pages, paperback, £39.50. Oxford, Blackwell Publishing. 2007. ISBN 978 1 40515 755 1 ![Figure][1] THE first edition of ‘Avian medicine and surgery’ was published over 20 years ago and
Article
KEEPERS of racing pigeons rear and train their own birds and may require veterinary advice when breeding and/or competition results prove unsatisfactory. The veterinary surgeon attending a racing pigeon loft must have a good understanding of the pigeon as an athlete and the factors that affect performance, as well as the epidemiology of diseases af...
Article
The records of 666 casualty collared doves examined at a wildlife hospital in south-west England over a period of five years were reviewed. Signs of metabolic bone disease were recorded in 51.2 per cent of the juvenile birds but in only 9.6 per cent of the adults. The incidence of the condition was highest between December and February and decrease...
Article
Lead poisoning remains a common finding in free-living British swans presented to wildlife hospitals, despite the ban on fishing shot containing lead between 0.06 and 28.36 g [9]. Blood lead levels as high as 145.4 μmol/L were reported in a nationwide survey, with a maximum level of 84.57 μmol/L reported for the southwest of England [9]. Intensive...
Article
SIR, – Colleagues in small animal practice will be all too aware of the pathogenicity of blowfly strike in pet rabbits and how upsetting the condition can be for rabbit owners. Recent work at the University of Bristol has quantified the prevalence of strike in rabbits and shown that the disease is
Article
DOMESTIC rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are often victims of fly strike or myiasis. Flies are attracted to lay their eggs on rabbits under various conditions and maggots hatching from these eggs then digest living tissue, in some cases causing considerable damage to the animal. The condition is extremely distressing for rabbit and owner alike. Thi...
Article
SIR, – In response to Tom Pennycott and colleagues ( VR , September 17, 2005, vol 157, p 360), it will be very interesting to uncover the extent of disease challenge at bird tables. Contamination of the environment around bird tables is likely to result in disease, particularly where
Article
Detailed ophthalmological examinations were made on 128 of the 216 free-living tawny owls (Strix aluco) examined at a wildlife hospital in the south west of England during the years 2000 to 2002. There were significant lesions in the eyes of 96 (75 per cent) of the birds examined. There were 147 adult birds admitted, of which 89 (60.5 per cent) wer...
Article
THE European badger (Meles meles) is the largest carnivorous British mammal and is common throughout much of the UK. It is found in most rural areas below an altitude of 500 m, but is especially common in south-west England and southern Wales. Road traffic accidents (RTAs) are one of the main reasons veterinary attention is sought for badgers. Inde...
Article
MANY birds, whether wild or domestic, presenting to veterinary practices will require appropriate first aid and emergency care in order to stabilise their condition; this is, indeed, necessary for the successful medical management of the avian patient. First aid is the skilled application of accepted principles of treatment following any injury or...
Article
The mute swan (Cygnus olor) is a common bird on British waterways with a breeding population, in 1988-1991, of some 25,800 to 27,000 birds. The mute swan frequently presents to wildlife hospitals and rehabilitation centres. Many of these swans have traumatic injuries following collisions and other accidents. Injuries involving the bird's beak (or b...
Article
The second part of this two-part article discusses the management of a number of soft tissue injuries commonly seen in the avian wildlife casualty. This is not an exhaustive review of avian wound management techniques and problems but serves to illustrate the techniques that can be used successfully to deal with and manage some of the more common p...
Article
Avian casualties can present with a wide range of injuries. Careful assessment of each case is necessary in order to identify those birds requiring urgent euthanasia on humane grounds and those who would benefit from care and rehabilitation. This two-part article will discuss the assessment of wounds in the avian wildlife casualty, patient triage a...
Article
Following bans on the use of most lead angling weights, the incidence of lead poisoning cases in Mute Swans started to fall and the population started to increase. However, surveys of lead levels in blood of rescued swans continue to show that a high proportion of the birds are carrying levels in excess of 1.21 mol/l. Since rescued swans, although...
Article
The Eurasian badger (Meles meles) is common throughout much of the British Isles with the greatest population density occurring in the South West [1]. Consequently, injured badgers are frequently presented to wildlife hospitals for care and rehabilitation. The two most common 'reasons for admission' for adult badgers presenting to the RSPCA's West...

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