Giulia Ghedini

Giulia Ghedini
Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC) | IGC

PhD

About

23
Publications
5,647
Reads
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519
Citations
Introduction
Giulia Ghedini currently works at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC) in Lisbon, Portugal. Giulia is an ecologist, broadly interested in understanding the processes that shape ecological communities. She is particularly interested in understanding how species interactions affect metabolism and, in turn, how changes in the energy use of organisms scale up to affect the functioning of their communities.
Additional affiliations
July 2016 - present
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 2013 - July 2016
University of Adelaide
Position
  • PhD
Education
September 2011 - October 2012
Università di Pisa
Field of study
  • Marine Biology
January 2010 - November 2010
The University of Sydney
Field of study
  • Science
October 2006 - July 2009
University of Ferrara
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity determines the productivity and stability of ecosystems but some aspects of biodiversity‐ecosystem functioning relationships remain poorly resolved. One key uncertainty is the inter‐relationship between biodiversity, energy and biomass production as communities develop over time. Energy production drives biomass accumulation but the ra...
Article
The spread of infectious disease is determined by the ability of a pathogen to proliferate within and spread between susceptible hosts. Processes that limit the performance of a pathogen thus occur at two scales: varying with both the availability of energy within a host, and the number of susceptible hosts in a patch. When the rate at which a host...
Article
Full-text available
Size and metabolism are highly correlated, so that community energy flux might be predicted from size distributions alone. However, the accuracy of predictions based on interspecific energy–size relationships relative to approaches not based on size distributions is unknown. We compare six approaches to predict energy flux in phytoplankton communit...
Article
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Within species, individuals of the same size can vary substantially in their metabolic rate. One source of variation in metabolism is conspecific density - individuals in denser populations may have lower metabolism than those in sparser populations. However, the mechanisms through which conspecifics drive metabolic suppression remain unclear. Whil...
Article
Genome size is tightly coupled to morphology, ecology, and evolution among species [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], with one of the best-known patterns being the relationship between cell size and genome size [6, 7]. Classic theories, such as the “selfish DNA hypothesis,” posit that accumulating redundant DNA has fitness costs but that larger cells can tolerate la...
Article
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Robert MacArthur's niche theory makes explicit predictions on how community function should change over time in a competitive community. A key prediction is that succession progressively minimizes the energy wasted by a community, but this minimization is a trade‐off between energy losses from unutilised resources and costs of maintenance. By predi...
Article
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Robert MacArthur developed a theory of community assembly based on competition. By incorporating energy flow, MacArthur's theory allows for predictions of community function. A key prediction is that communities minimise energy wastage over time, but this minimisation is a trade‐off between two conflicting processes: exploiting food resources, and...
Article
Full-text available
1.A major goal of metabolic ecology is to make predictions across scales such that individual metabolic rates might be used to predict the metabolic rates of populations and communities, but the success of these predictions is unclear given the rarity of tests. 2.Given that older communities tend to have species with slower life histories and large...
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Changes in population density alter the availability, acquisition, and expenditure of resources by individuals, and consequently their contribution to the flux of energy in a system. While both negative and positive density-dependence have been well studied in natural populations, we are yet to estimate the underlying energy flows that generate the...
Article
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Trophic compensation, via intensifying consumption, stabilizes against boosted production at lower trophic levels. The ensuing potential for population outbreaks of herbivores is suppressed by intensifying predation. Ecosystem change reflects the shifting balance between the propagation of CO2 enrichment and its consumption; a chain of direct and i...
Article
The response of complex ecological communities to ocean acidification reflects interactions among species that propagate or dampen ecological change. Yet, most studies have been based on short-term experiments with limited numbers of interacting species. Both limitations tend to exaggerate measured effects and when combined with our predisposition...
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The problem of linking fine-scale processes to broad-scale patterns remains a central challenge of ecology. As rates of abiotic change intensify, there is a critical need to understand how individual responses aggregate to generate compensatory dynamics that stabilize community processes. Notably, whilst local and global resource enhancement (e.g....
Article
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Article
Full-text available
Background: The ecological consequences of climate change will be driven by a combination of both gradual and abrupt changes in climatic conditions. Despite growing evidence that abrupt abiotic change of extreme events may profoundly alter ecological processes, it remains unclear how such events may combine with longer-term global and local disturb...
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Ecologists seem predisposed to studying change because we are intuitively interested in dynamic systems, including their vulnerability to human disturbance. We contrast this disposition with the value of studying processes that work against change. Although powerful, processes that counter disturbance often go unexplored because they yield no obser...
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Current trends in habitat loss have been forecast to accelerate under anticipated global change, thereby focusing conservation attention on identifying the circumstances under which key species interactions retard habitat loss. Urbanised coastlines are associated with broad-scale loss of kelp canopies and their replacement by less productive mats o...
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Disturbance often results in small changes in community structure, but the probability of transitioning to contrasting states increases when multiple disturbances combine. Nevertheless, we have limited insights into the mechanisms that stabilise communities, particularly how perturbations can be absorbed without restructuring (i.e. resistance). Her...
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AimBiological invasions are among the main threats to biodiversity. To promote a mechanistic understanding of the ecological impacts of non-native seaweeds, we assessed how effects on resident organisms vary according to their trophic level.LocationGlobal.Methods We performed meta-analytical comparisons of the effects of non-native seaweeds on both...
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Anthropogenic activities have increased the number of stressors acting on ecosystems. When multiple stressors act simultaneously, there is a greater probability of additive, synergistic and antagonistic effects occurring among them. Where additive and synergistic effects occur, managers may yield disproportionately large benefits where they first a...
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Compounded effects of climate change and local human activities are threatening marine biodiversity worldwide. At a regional scale (10s to 100s km), comparisons among areas characterized by the prevalence of different human activities provide an insight into the effects of anthropogenic disturbances at multiple levels of ecological organization (i....
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Full-text available
Storm-water run-off is an important source of contamination and cause of water quality degradation in urbanised coastal areas. Although laboratory tests show that run-off is toxic for some organisms, its effects in the field remain uncertain. We investigated the effects of run-off on assemblages of mobile invertebrates within kelp beds in Sydney Ha...