Gisela Tomé Lourido

Gisela Tomé Lourido
University of Leeds · Department of Linguistics and Phonetics

Doctor of Philosophy

About

14
Publications
1,754
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72
Citations

Publications

Publications (14)
Conference Paper
This paper presents a theoretical and quantitative analysis of epenthesis and vowel intrusion in Central Dhofari Mehri. One of six endangered Modern South Arabian languages indigenous to southern Arabia, Mehri is spoken by members of the Mahrah tribe in southern Oman, eastern Yemen, parts of southern and eastern Saudi Arabia and in diasporic commun...
Conference Paper
Shehret (aka Jibbali, or Shahri) is a Modern South Arabian language (MSAL) spoken in southern Oman by approximately 50,000 people. Among its 36 consonant phonemes are three voiceless-voiced-emphatic (pharyngealized) triads of fricatives at the interdental, alveolar and alveolar-lateral places of articulation (Rubin, 2014): /θ ð θˤ, s z sˤ, ɬ ɮ ɬˤ/....
Conference Paper
This paper presents an acoustic and auditory analysis of the short vowels of Mehri, a Modern South Arabian language (MSAL) spoken in Dhofar (southern Oman), eastern Yemen and parts of southern Saudi Arabia. Interest in Mehri vowels lies in the fact that phonologically distinct vowels are often phonetically extremely close: a fact of significance bo...
Presentation
Full-text available
An acoustic investigation of intrusive and epenthetic vowels in Mehri of Central Dhofar, with a look at intrusive vowels in Shehret
Article
Full-text available
The inclusion of European minority languages in public spaces such as education, administration and the media has led to the emergence of a new profile of speakers, “new speakers”, who typically acquire a minority language through education, but vary in terms of their language experience and use. The present study investigated whether a distinctive...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the vowel productions of three groups of adult Galician-Spanish bilinguals: Spanish-dominant (SD) bilinguals, Galician-dominant (GD) bilinguals, and Dual Switch (DS) bilinguals who had early experience with Galician in the home, predominantly used Spanish upon school entry, but in adolescence/adulthood switched to Galician for i...
Article
As a result of complex international migration patterns, listeners in large urban centres such as London, UK, likely encounter large amounts of variation in spoken language. However, although dealing with variation is crucial to communication, relatively little is known about how the ability to do this develops. Still less is known about how this m...
Article
Full-text available
It has long been debated whether speech production and perception remain flexible in adulthood. The current study investigates the effects of language dominance switch in Galician new speakers (neofalantes) who are raised with Spanish as a primary language and learn Galician at an early age in a bilingual environment, but in adolescence, decide to...
Conference Paper
It has long been debated whether speech processing remains flexible in adulthood. This thesis contributes to our understanding of this question by investigating bilingual speech development in a naturalistic setting. Galician ‘new speakers’ (neofalantes) are unbalanced bilinguals raised with Spanish as a primary language, who learn Galician at an e...
Conference Paper
Mimicry and laughter are two social signals displaying affiliation among people. To date, however, their relationship remains uninvestigated and relatively unexploited in designing the behaviour of robots and virtual characters. This paper presents an experiment aimed at examining how laughter and mimicry are related. The hypothesis is that hand mo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In minority language communities, language choice may be related to identity. In the bilingual community of Galicia, some speakers switch language dominance at a late stage in development, normally during adolescence. These 'new speakers', neofalantes, are originally dominant in Spanish but switch to Galician for cultural or ideological reasons. Th...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
More and more children are growing up in increasingly linguistically diverse communities (multilingual, multidialectal). However, relatively little is known about how children acquire sociolinguistic competence, i.e., awareness and use of social-indexical information in speech processing. This project investigates how children develop the ability to perceive and use sociolinguistic information in the speech signal and whether their ability to process accent variation is affected by language background and exposure, i.e., whether they are raised in an urban or rural environment.