Giorgio Buccellati

Giorgio Buccellati
University of California, Los Angeles | UCLA · Cotsen Institute of Archaeology (IOA)

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63
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Publications (63)
Book
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In A Critique of Archaeological Reason, Giorgio Buccellati presents a theory of excavation that aims at clarifying the nature of archaeology and its impact on contemporary thought. Integrating epistemological issues with methods of data collection and the role and impact of digital technology on archaeological work, the book explores digital data i...
Chapter
Of presumably several Hurrian kingdoms before the 2nd millennium, Urkesh is the only one known so far from excavations. It showed enough political, if not military, power to withstand the expansion of the Akkadian Empire.
Chapter
The ancient city of Terqa (modern Tell Asharah), located on the middle Euphrates upstream from Mari, flourished in the third and second millennia bce.Keywords:ancient Near East history;anthropology;archaeology
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Buccellati Giorgio, « Towards a linguistic model for archaeology », Revue d'assyriologie et d'archéologie orientale,Distribution électronique Cairn.info pour P.U.F.. © P.U.F.. Tous droits réservés pour tous pays. La reproduction ou représentation de cet article, notamment par photocopie, n'est autorisée que dans les limites des conditions générales...
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Article
Lamentations over the condition of archaeological publication abound these days. A recent volume of essays-of distinguished provenance-rounds up the usual suspects. Yet a fundamental point is altogether missing from its discussion. What archaeologists observe and can readily document is emplacement, i.e., the cultural remains they identify in the g...
Article
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The monumental building excavated at the margin of Tell Mozan offered its legacy in miniature: Hundreds of seal impressions, small and fragile nuggets of clay. Discarded on the building's floor, the sealings provided satisfying proof that Tell Mozan was the site of the third-millennium Hurrian capital city Urkesh. But they also revealed the presenc...
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For a number of years before the discovery of Mari, the tablets of Khana were the only cuneiform texts from Syria known to Assyriologists. Incremented considerably in number by the ongoing excavations at Terqa, they shed light on an important period of ancient Syrian history, corresponding to the Late Old Babylonian period. But more important than...
Article
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The presence of fossil fuel compounds in archaeological samples giving ages much higher than expected has long been suspected but never proved by appropriate chemical analyses. An excessively high conventional 14C age was found in an archaeological charcoal sample from Terqa, Syria1 (S313, Table 1). Its14 C age of 28,700 yr BP was at variance with...
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The Sumerian Descent of Inanna 1 relates, in a poetic narrative form, events and situations of the divine \vorld-it is, in the common understanding of the word, a myth. It seems, however, possible to suggest a cultic setting for the story, which, if correct, would improve our understanding of certain aspects of the text, would add immediacy and con...
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1.1. The graphemic base 1.1.1. The writing medium Akkadian and Amorite are dead languages, in the specific sense that their speakers died out around 1600 B.C. (for Amorite) and 600 B.C. (for Akka-dian). Our reconstruction of both languages is thus based exclusively on the written record, cxcept for the inferences that may be drawn from the fact tha...
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DISSERTATION (PH.D.)--THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Dissertation Abstracts International,

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