Gina Wisker

Gina Wisker
University of Brighton · International centre for higher education management

PhD

About

233
Publications
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1,346
Citations

Publications

Publications (233)
Chapter
This chapter looks at possession, at Cinderella and Bluebeard influences. Possession lies at the heart of the ghost’s role in an economy of romance and domesticity which values, seduces, deludes, constrains, and sometimes destroys women. Women become possessed by compelling but ultimately destructive narratives—Cinderella marrying the prince (‘Ashp...
Chapter
This chapter draws on the past, focusing on séances and spiritualism mostly in the contemporary period. Michèle Roberts’ In the Red Kitchen (1990), Hilary Mantel’s Beyond Black (2005) and Sarah Waters’ Affinity (1999) reveal that while women’s labour, domestic or other service work, is largely invisible, with their work as spirit mediums the worlds...
Chapter
Contemporary women’s ghost stories focus on both loss and recovery, moving on. This chapter looks at the relationship between mankind and nature in the Anthropocene, trauma, genocide, ghosts and women victim survivors. Sarah Moss’s Ghost Wall is set on Hadrian’s Wall, where the physical wall and the wall of time align the historical abuse of a sacr...
Chapter
Ghost stories are not just entertaining tales for dark firesides. They expose cultural constructions, constraints and lies, false promises and the violence people do to each other, which produces trauma in individuals, cultures, across generations. Creative and critical work in Contemporary Women’s Ghost Stories establishes the variety, intentions...
Chapter
Places and families can tether the living and the dead to unfinished business, damaged histories, inherited loss. This chapter concentrates on the insecurities, the liminality of transient spaces, visits, visitations and the trap of unresolved tragedies and deaths linked to these places which engulf the inhabitants and the newcomers. In Shirley Jac...
Chapter
Writers from Singapore and Malaysia revitalise the issues of trauma underlying many ghost stories and consider how they grow from and express different histories, cultures and contexts. Their work considers the ghosts of rebellion in Malaya, and of war, in the Japanese invasion of Singapore. Sandi Tan’s work, in particular, looks at women’s vulnera...
Chapter
Both novels reflect the brutal abjection of and widespread culturally produced damage done to those denigrated as ‘others’, here women, their bodies, their own and others’ vulnerable children, each indicting deadly unequal societies and expressing a potential threatening legacy. Susan Hill’s novel leaves the ghostly woman in black, Jennet Humfrye,...
Chapter
A place of safety for women in particular, the house and home is also often one of utmost danger because of that alignment with identity, place, security and safety, physical, economic, social and psychological. For many, it is dangerous because of woman’s position within the home, should a controlling abusive or murderous man dominate, own or inte...
Chapter
The haunting, destructive nature of trauma is revealed in the damage of war in the Vietnamese War, with Duong’s Novel without a Name (1995), in which the ghosts of soldiers, including women brutalised by the enemy, seek recognition and memorialisation. In France after the First World War, the traumatic loss of his brother leads the protagonist, Fre...
Article
Full-text available
Many countries have doctoral viva examinations, mostly conducted in-person until the COVID-19 pandemic. This article explores the changing processes and experiences of doctoral vivas forced online, from the perspectives of three examiners (two Uk, one NZ) and one recent candidate (UK). It sheds light on remote viva examinations exploring experience...
Article
The global pandemic has forced academics to engage in remote doctoral supervision, and the need to understand this activity is greater than ever before. This contribution involved a cross-field review on remote supervision pertinent in the context of a global pandemic. We have utilised the results of an earlier study bringing a supervision model in...
Article
Full-text available
Editors of academic journals play a key part in the production of knowledge and the continuation of scholarly conversations about practical and intellectual issues of the day. While peer review, an essential part of journal processes, has received considerable attention in the scholarly and the popular press, much of it critical, the role of the ch...
Article
Daphne Du Maurier’s Gothic horror destabilises the ordinary, the familiar everyday, revealing seemingly safe relationship and places to be undependable, even dangerous. Simultaneously, she disturbs the complacencies of familiar worldviews and the narratives with which we direct and understand our lives, including those of family, security, identity...
Article
Full-text available
Every year, around 35% of engineering graduates (mainly female and ethnic minority graduates) in the UK choose roles outside engineering. Given that engineering disciplines struggle to attract recruits, this represents a significant loss of qualified talent the profession can ill afford. A possible reason why engineers choose not to practise after...
Chapter
In our rapidly globalising world, “the global scholar” is a key concept for reimagining the roles of academics at the nexus of the global and the local. This book critically explores the implications of the concept for understanding postgraduate studies and supervision. It uses three conceptual lenses – “horizon”, “currency” and “trajectory” – to o...
Chapter
The field of Margaret Atwood studies, like her own work, is in constant evolution. This second edition of The Cambridge Companion to Margaret Atwood provides substantial reconceptualization of Atwood's writing in multiple genres that has spanned six decades, with particular focus on developments since 2000. Exploring Atwood in our contemporary cont...
Chapter
Alice Walker’s The Color Purple (1983) Maya Angelou’s I know why the Caged Bird sings (1969) and Toni Morrison’s Beloved (1987) rewrote the silenced histories of African-American women’s lives, troubled complacent reading practices, and permanently changed the landscape of what, why and how readers engage with writing. Their work challenges scant,...
Chapter
Wisker examines the underside of the glittering, capitalist, competitive face of Singapore. Arguing that there is a hidden, ghostly, resentful parallel world to that of the outward-facing side of the city, she suggests that it is this dark Singapore that has more to tell us about urban life. Looking at contemporary writing and media, Wisker explore...
Book
Full-text available
Brighton's #BlackLivesMatters (BLM) protests in June and July witnessed thousands and thousands of people from diverse ethnic backgrounds speaking together in one voice of unity and strength against racism. The public broadcasting of physical violence inflicted on George Floyd, and his subsequent death, was clear for all to see and to be appalled...
Article
This article reports on a study that focuses on students from rural areas of South Africa and their experiences of higher education. These students have attracted little attention in widening participation research in South Africa, despite being one of the most marginalised groups. The article, drawing on the experiences of student co-researchers a...
Preprint
This is a research and experience based piece on creative ways to support academic writing -not yet published but en route.....
Article
Full-text available
This paper makes visible the experiences of students transitioning to higher education from rural communities and backgrounds in South Africa. In line with decolonial perspectives, the research adopted a participatory methodology that involved students as co-researchers. We argue that there is a lack of recognition of students from rural contexts,...
Chapter
This chapter explores higher level scientific thinking skills that research students need to develop during their research learning journeys towards their dissertation/thesis at postgraduate levels, and also final year undergraduate (Australian honours year) dissertation. A model of four quadrants is introduced. Practice and experience-informed exa...
Chapter
This essay first moves rapidly through arguments about the end of feminism to refute optimistic blinkered versions, arguing that postfeminist Gothic consistently problematises complacencies about rights, cultures and bodies. Instead it offers flexible notions of ‘becoming’ woman, gives voice and body to the Other and radicalises representations of...
Article
Purpose Much research into outcomes of doctoral learning focuses on employability, or the dearth of academic employment in relation to doctoral graduate expectations, emphasising precarity of academic future work. This new work begins with and moves beyond employment issues, highlighting professional practice and personal knowledge development and...
Article
Full-text available
This is a short (2 page) summary of the key findings and policy recommendations arising from the SARiHE project research
Research
Full-text available
This report presents a summary of key findings from the SARiHE - Southern African Rurality in Higher Education Project.
Article
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This article offers insights into supervisor awareness of conceptual threshold crossings in doctoral learning nuanced by researcher disciplines. First explored in undergraduate learning, threshold concepts highlight variation related to learning in the disciplines, identifying how realising the absolutely key concepts in disciplines causes troubles...
Article
Much current debate about undergraduate student research involves a focus on ‘students as partners’ and co-constructors of knowledge (Healey, Flint & Harrington 2014, 2016). This debate reveals interesting tensions between student freedom and the role of structuring frameworks. Undergraduate lecturers and research supervisors might feel we are in a...
Chapter
Full-text available
Supernatural Horror in Literature canonizes a primarily male tradition of weird writing, and H.P. Lovecraft’s fictional women are often abject constructs; the sex acts he implies are linked to miscegenation that threatens humankind. Despite this, there is a Lovecraftian legacy of work by women writers, one this chapter explores, focusing on work by...
Article
Full-text available
The Quality in Postgraduate Research conference (QPR) has been held in Adelaide, South Australia, every two years since 1994. The conference is a collaboration between three local universities, the University of Adelaide, Flinders University and the University of South Australia and a brief discussion of its development can be found in McCulloch an...
Article
Full-text available
Much international doctoral learning research focuses on personal, institutional and learning support provided by supervisors, managed relationships,‘nudging’ robust, conceptual, critical, creative work. Other work focuses on stresses experienced in supervisor-student relationships and doctoral journeys. Some considers formal and informal learning...
Article
Full-text available
Higher education (HE) systems sustain and reproduce inequalities despite intentions to redress them. However, widening participation rooted in social justice practices increases participation in HE for marginalised under-represented groups through overt, shared and practised values in action and mobilization of HE interests and resources. Drawing o...
Article
A blackened, burned dress hangs limply in an upstairs wardrobe in a dusty, deserted house in the Fens in Ruth Rendell's The Brimstone Wedding (1996). This dress, like the airless, loveless, and love-lost houses in both The Brimstone Wedding and The Secret House of Death (1968) serves as a reminder of false romantic promises, the emptying out of des...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose This research aims to explore the professional identity of supervisors and their perceptions of stress in doctoral learning supervision. The research determines ways of developing strategies of resilience and well-being to overcome stress, leading to positive outcomes for supervisors and students. Design/methodology/approach Research is...
Article
A blackened, burned dress hangs limply in an upstairs wardrobe in a dusty, deserted house in the Fens in Ruth Rendell’s The Brimstone Wedding (1996). This dress, like the airless, loveless, and love-lost houses in both The Brimstone Wedding and The Secret House of Death (1968) serves as a reminder of false romantic promises, the emptying out of des...
Chapter
This chapter examines how fictional vampires problematise received notions of women’s passivity, ‘natural’ nurturing skills and social conformity, suggesting that female vampires destabilise such comfortable, culturally inflected investments. Performativity, abjection and carnival lie at the heart of their construction and representation so there i...
Article
Full-text available
Supervision is generally recognised as playing a crucial role in the quality of a research student’s doctoral experience and their academic outcomes and, in common with most areas of higher education, there is an oft-stated desire to pursue excellence in this important area. Excellence in research degree supervision is, however, an elusive concept...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The HEA ‘Defining and Supporting SoTL’ project (RT05) was a collaborative project involving the contribution of four main UK partners – the University of West London, the University of Brighton, the University of Bristol, and Keele University and a number of other national and international contributors. This project was carried out in the context...
Chapter
Full-text available
As a participant in ‘What Works’ (2013-17), an HEA-led programme that aims to enhance student success and retention in higher education, the University of Brighton is conducting an ongoing evaluation to investigate students’ experiences of starting their degrees, including retention interventions in three disciplines: Business Management, Applied S...
Chapter
Full-text available
Academics are subject to confusing sets of values in a marketised higher education system which sees students as co-producers of knowledge and also consumers, customers and products. In the turmoil of competing drives to re- orientate, academic identities are also in turmoil.
Chapter
Research into doctoral student learning has focused on stages of the learning journey (Wisker et al., 2010), communities (Wisker et al., 2003; Vekkaila, Pyhältö, & Lonka, 2013; Wisker & Morris, 2010; Holbrook et al., 2003) and doctoral ‘orphans’ (Wisker & Robinson, 2012). Building on that earlier work, this research is concerned with how doctoral s...
Chapter
Full-text available
Sarah Waters’s The Little Stranger (2009) builds on women’s ghost story precedents, including those of Susan Hill (1983), and Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca (1938), which talk back to Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre (1846), the name of which echoes that of the decayed landed gentry family in Waters’s novel, the Ayres. Each of these novels is a tale of wo...
Chapter
The research journey is a messy one, full of surprises, difficulties, discoveries, hard work, beginnings and some form of closure. The thesis, whether a monograph or published/publishable articles and a theorised "wrap", is well organised and lucidly articulated; it evidences consistent theories and themes; asks questions and analyses findings; pre...
Chapter
This chapter considers how postcolonial Gothic women writers expose the double oppression of gender and race, using figures of the ghost, vampire and zombie, revenants reminding us of hidden histories, a silenced past. Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea (1966) begins this process rewriting Charlotte Brontë’s nineteenth-century Gothic classic, Jane Eyre (...
Chapter
This chapter considers the postcolonial Gothic challenge to oppressive colonial and gendered haunted houses, narratives and constructions figured here as ‘Bluebeard and his castle’ to suggest both the mind-set and the fabric of repressive patriarchal and colonial control, which the postcolonial Gothic helps to dismantle. African American/Canadian T...
Chapter
This chapter considers how Susan Hill’s revival of the British ghost story, The Woman in Black (1983), suddenly reawoke many readers to the power of the Gothic through the ghost story to reveal the horrible secrets of the past and their deadly legacy in the present. This chapter shows how contemporary women’s ghost stories rewrite nineteenth and tw...
Chapter
Gina Wisker’s work asks and answers the questions: Why do contemporary women write the Gothic? What are the essential links between feminist perspectives and critiques, and the contemporary Gothic? It begins by establishing a background in historical Gothic writing by women—Gothic revival in Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca, Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea...
Chapter
This chapter discusses two Canadian women Gothic writers, Alice Munro and Margaret Atwood exposing how our own narratives and those of others control and misrepresent us. Munro’s Gothic tales are of vast open spaces and small constrained lives, escapes and performances which lead to dead ends. Gina Wisker explores how Margaret Atwood undercuts the...
Chapter
The final chapter looks at how despite threats of its imminent exhaustion and demise, the several branches of contemporary women’s Gothic flourish and diversify. The chapter argues that Gothic is a cultural connection and critical comment, essentially political and personal. The extraordinary horrors of the everyday might threaten to overwhelm our...
Chapter
Vampires are the ultimate Gothic creatures, a living dead contradiction able to vehicle the angst, desires and fears of whatever time, place and cultural context produces them. Sexier, better dressed and more able to pass as romantic leads than zombies, their use as a measure of the gendered cultural concerns and contradictions of time and place is...
Chapter
This chapter revitalises perspectives on Angela Carter exploring how the Gothic is malleable in her hands. Carter demythologises constraining myths of gender and power, using the Gothic’s ability to hold polarities in tension and expose performativity while celebrating potential and excess. The baroque, embellished language and imagery of Angela Ca...
Chapter
This chapter explores cultural haunting in African American women’s Gothic, looking closely at Toni Morrison’s Beloved (1987), her later Home (2012) and at Tananarive Due’s Joplin’s Ghost (2006). It deals with the ways in which the Gothic exposes hidden painful histories of endemic racism, treatment of people as less than human because of their eth...
Chapter
This chapter explores contemporary fascination with the vampire, looking at the popular fictional vampire of the twenty-first century—Stephenie Meyer’s (Twilight) and Charlaine Harris’ (True Blood) often conservative use of a radical figure. This emphasises the return of the vampire romance, management of cultural values, the power of the family an...
Article
‘At last we have a definitive guide to the marriage between contemporary women’s fiction and the Gothic, which gleefully plunges the romance plot into darkness and prises heroines away from constraining narratives in an endless series of reinventions from the Cartesque through to the post-colonial.’ – Marie Mulvey-Roberts, University of the West o...
Chapter
As a genre, Gothic horror has never been more popular on the university syllabus, yet, because it is often seen as low brow, popular culture, distasteful schlock, horror hides behind the ‘Gothic’, its more respectable half, or behind speculative fiction, or period studies.1 Gothic horror appears in the work of many classic and contemporary writers....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Within the current higher education context, early career researchers (ECRs) face a ‘risk-career’ in which predictable, stable academic careers have become increasingly rare. Traditional milestones to signal progress toward a sustainable research career are disappearing or subject to reinterpretation, and ECRs need to attend to new or reimagined si...
Article
Full-text available
The literature review is arguably the place in a thesis where doctoral authors convincingly engage with theory and theoretical perspectives underlying their research, situating their own contribution to knowledge in established and ongoing dialogues in the field. One difficulty doctoral candidates encounter in their learning to be researchers is ar...
Article
Full-text available
Within the current higher education context, early career researchers (ECRs) face a 'risk-career' in which predictable, stable academic careers have become increasingly rare. Traditional milestones to signal progress toward a sustainable research career are disappearing or subject to reinterpretation, and ECRs need to attend to new or reimagined si...

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