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Gilberte Gendron

Gilberte Gendron
Sustainable Ocean Seychelles

Master in Oceanography

About

17
Publications
2,153
Reads
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88
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2020 - present
Bee Ecological Consulting
Position
  • Consultant
October 2019 - present
Sustainable Ocean Seychelles
Position
  • CEO
July 2013 - September 2020
Seychelles National Parks Authority
Position
  • Research Officer
Education
September 2015 - December 2017
Université du Québec à Rimouski UQAR
Field of study
  • Oceanography
August 2009 - June 2012
Aix-Marseille Université
Field of study
  • Environmental science

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
Repeat marine heat wave‐induced mass coral bleaching has decimated reefs in Seychelles for 35 years, but how coral‐associated microbial diversity (microalgal endosymbionts of the family Symbiodiniaceae and bacterial communities) potentially underpins broad‐scale bleaching dynamics remains unknown. We assessed microbiome composition during the 2016...
Article
Full-text available
Climate-induced mass bleaching events are one of the greatest threats to coral reefs, causing widespread loss of coral cover. Drivers of recovery and adaptation for coral reefs in the face of repeated large-scale disturbances are unclear, with marked differences across geographies. Using a monitoring dataset lasting from 2005 to 2018, we documented...
Article
Full-text available
During the 2019 First Descent: Seychelles Expedition, shallow and deep reef ecosystems of the Seychelles Outer Islands were studied by deploying a variety of underwater technologies to survey their benthic flora and fauna. Submersibles, remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) and SCUBA diving teams used stereo-video camera systems to record benthic commu...
Article
1. Extensive and dense macroalgal fields can compromise the ecosystem function of habitat mosaics on reefs owing to their limiting effect on patch connectivity. Macroalgae can maintain and increase their dominance with effective self-reinforcing feedback mechanisms. For example, macroalgae can form dense beds, supressing coral settlement and grazin...
Article
Full-text available
There is an assumption that tropical sea urchins are macroalgal grazers with the ability to control macroalgal expansion on degraded coral reefs. We surveyed abundances of Echinothrix calamaris, an urchin species common in the western Indian Ocean on 21 reefs of the inner Seychelles and predicted their density using habitat predictors in a modellin...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to explore an emerging discipline addressing the impact of anthropogenic noise on larval stages of marine organisms. We assessed the influence of boat noise on the feeding behaviour of the pelagic larvae of winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus, Walbaum, 1792). The hypothesis was that boat noise influences the fee...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reef ecosystems are among the first to fundamentally change in structure due to climate change, which leads to questioning of whether decades of knowledge regarding reef management is still applicable. Here we assess ecological responses to no-take marine reserves over two decades, spanning a major climate-driven coral bleaching event. Pre-bl...
Article
Full-text available
Rapidly rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations are driving acidification in parallel with warming of the oceans. Future ocean acidification scenarios have the potential to impact coral growth and associated reef function, although reports suggest such affects could be reduced in adjacent seagrass habitats as a result of physio-chemical buffering. To...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Project rationale & goals: The Seychelles are located within one of the major marine biodiversity hotspots of the world. Key marine ecosystems in the archipelago include coral reefs, mangroves, seagrass beds and a vast pelagic system that support the local subsistence and commercial fisheries. However, concerns recently emerged regarding the resilience of the Seychelles’ marine ecosystems due to increasing human pressures. Improving our understanding of marine ecosystems that support the Seychelles fisheries is critical to ensure effective management and to anticipate adverse effects of rapid economic development. In addition to direct impacts on species richness and habitat, human activities are sources of a myriad of chemicals including metals and persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Trace metal and POP toxicity in marine organisms, in association with their long residence time within food chains and the potential risk of human exposure, makes it necessary to monitor the levels of these contaminants in organisms. In this context, SEYFISH, a multidisciplinary and collaborative research project, aims to address two main questions: What do capture fisheries provide in term of valuable nutrients for the Seychelles population? How important are they for ensuring food and nutrition security in Seychelles? How and to which extend may global change affect the health benefits and risks associated with wild fish consumption? How are the Seychelles marine ecosystems structured? How are they able to cope with increasing global changes? What could be recommended in terms of ecosystems’ and fisheries’ monitoring and conservation measures? Activities: • Collection of wide range of commercial species from the Inner and Outer Island groups in collaboration with local fishermen and respective associations and non-governmental organizations • Analysis of nutritional value and contaminant content in the sampled fish: Targeted nutrients include the macro- (total fat, proteins, carbohydrates, and derived caloric content) and micro-nutrients (essential minerals, amino and fatty acids); targeted contaminants include the regulated persistent bioaccumulative and toxic substances listed in the Stockholm Convention and emerging ones. • Development of a web-portal to make available fisheries nutritional information • Characterization of species groups with similar contaminant/nutrient inputs, and identification of trophic interactions and pathways of energy flow between those groups using statistical approaches • Modelling of marine ecosystems to help understand their structure, function and dynamics, and how they may change under climate and fishing pressure • Quantitative benefit-risk assessment of wild fisheries to determine the frequency, amount and choice of fish consumed that would maximize the net health benefits for Seychelles population.