Gil M Costa

Gil M Costa
Champalimaud Neuroscience Program · Research / Neuroscience

PhD

About

4
Publications
2,525
Reads
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380
Citations
Citations since 2017
1 Research Item
310 Citations
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Introduction
Gil M Costa currently works at the Gulbenkian Foundation and at the Champalimaud Neuroscience Program. Gil does Graphic Design, Communication Design. Their most recent publication is 'Orbitofrontal Cortex Is Required for Optimal Waiting Based on Decision Confidence'.
Additional affiliations
January 2015 - present
Champalimaud Neuroscience Program
Position
  • PhD Student
December 2007 - July 2008
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Position
  • Visiting Student
October 2007 - July 2015
Champalimaud Neuroscience Program
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Confidence judgments are a central example of metacognition—knowledge about one's own cogni-tive processes. According to this metacognitive view, confidence reports are generated by a sec-ond-order monitoring process based on the quality of internal representations about beliefs. Although neural correlates of decision confidence have been recently...
Article
Full-text available
The neural origins of spontaneous or self-initiated actions are not well understood and their interpretation is controversial. To address these issues, we used a task in which rats decide when to abort waiting for a delayed tone. We recorded neurons in the secondary motor cortex (M2) and interpreted our findings in light of an integration-to-bound...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A fundamental component of decision-making under uncertainty is the ability to assign appropriate levels of confidence to each decision. Although our recent behavioral, electrophysiological and computational studies on orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) revealed that OFC activity correlates with decision confidence (Kepecs et al., 2008), this brain structu...

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