Gideon Bradburd

Gideon Bradburd
Michigan State University | MSU · Department of Integrative Biology

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29
Publications
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1,957
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Publications

Publications (29)
Preprint
Previous theory of host-parasite coevolution has focused on understanding the determinants of reciprocal local adaptation using spatially discrete models. However, these studies fall short of describing patterns of host-parasite local adaptation across spatial scales. In contrast, empirical work demonstrates patterns of adaptation depend on the sca...
Preprint
A bstract Rates of phenotypic evolution vary markedly across the tree of life, from the accelerated evolution apparent in adaptive radiations to the remarkable evolutionary stasis exhibited by so-called “living fossils”. Such rate variation has important consequences for large-scale evolutionary dynamics, generating vast disparities in phenotypic d...
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Investigating the spatial distribution of genetic and phenotypic variation can provide insights into the evolutionary processes that shape diversity in natural systems. We characterized patterns of genetic and phenotypic diversity to learn about drivers of color-pattern diversification in red-eyed treefrogs (Agalychnis callidryas) in Costa Rica. Al...
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Genomic data are being produced and archived at a prodigious rate, and current studies could become historical baselines for future global genetic diversity analyses and monitoring programs. However, when we evaluated the potential utility of genomic data from wild and domesticated eukaryote species in the world’s largest genomic data repository, w...
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Although least chipmunks (Neotamias minimus) are a widely distributed North American species of least concern, the southernmost population, N. m. atristriatus (Peñasco least chipmunk), is imperiled and a candidate for federal listing as a subspecies. We conducted a phylogeographic analysis across the N. minimus range to assess genomic differentiati...
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When species are continuously distributed across environmental gradients, the relative strength of selection and gene flow shape spatial patterns of genetic variation, potentially leading to variable levels of differentiation across loci. Determining whether adaptive genetic variation tends to be structured differently than neutral variation along...
Preprint
Full-text available
Investigating the spatial distribution of genetic and phenotypic variation can provide insights into the evolutionary processes that shape diversity in natural systems. We characterized patterns of genetic and phenotypic diversity to learn about drivers of color-pattern diversification in red-eyed treefrogs ( Agalychnis callidryas ) in Costa Rica....
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Full-text available
The Modern Synthesis (or “Neo‐Darwinism”), which arose out of the reconciliation of Darwin's theory of natural selection and Mendel's research on genetics, remains the foundation of evolutionary theory. However, since its inception, it has been a lightning rod for criticism, which has ranged from minor quibbles to complete dismissal. Among the most...
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Moving animals on a landscape through translocations and reintroductions is an important management tool used in the recovery of endangered species, particularly for the maintenance of population genetic diversity and structure. Management of imperiled amphibian species rely heavily on translocations and reintroductions, especially for species that...
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Gene flow is an enigmatic evolutionary force because it can limit adaptation but may also rescue small populations from inbreeding depression [1-3]. Several iconic examples of genetic rescue-increased population growth caused by gene flow [4, 5]-have reversed population declines [6, 7]. However, concerns about outbreeding depression and maladaptive...
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Evolutionary adaptation to extreme environments often requires coordinated changes in multiple intersecting physiological pathways, but how such multi-trait adaptation occurs remains unresolved. Transcription factors, which regulate the expression of many genes and can simultaneously alter multiple phenotypes, may be common targets of selection if...
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Many important questions about the history and dynamics of organisms have a geographical component: How many are there, and where do they live? How do they move and interbreed across the landscape? How were they moving a thousand years ago, and where were the ancestors of a particular individual alive today? Answers to these questions can have prof...
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Gene flow is an enigmatic evolutionary force because it can limit adaptation but can also help populations escape inbreeding depression. Manipulating gene flow for conservation purposes is a controversial, but potentially powerful management strategy. We use multigenerational pedigrees and genomics to test demographic and evolutionary consequences...
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Gut microbiota in geographically isolated host populations are often distinct. These differences have been attributed to between-population differences in host behaviours, environments, genetics and geographical distance. However, which factors are most important remains unknown. Here, we fill this gap for baboons by leveraging information on 13 en...
Preprint
Full-text available
Many questions that we have about the history and dynamics of organisms have a geographical component: How many are there, and where? How do they move and interbreed across the landscape? How were they moving a thousand years ago, and where did the ancestors of an individual today live? Answers to these questions can have profound consequences for...
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Full-text available
An important step in the analysis of genetic data is to describe and categorize natural variation. Individuals that live close together are, on average, more genetically similar than individuals sampled farther apart... A classic problem in population genetics is the characterization of discrete population structure in the presence of continuous pa...
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A classic problem in population genetics is the characterization of discrete population structure in the presence of continuous patterns of genetic differentiation. Especially when sampling is discontinuous, the use of clustering or assignment methods may incorrectly ascribe differentiation due to continuous processes (e.g., geographic isolation by...
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Genetic divergence between populations is shaped by a combination of drift, migration, and selection, yielding patterns of isolation-by-distance (IBD) and isolation-by-environment (IBE). Unfortunately, IBD and IBE may be confounded when comparing divergence across habitat boundaries. For instance, parapatric lake and stream threespine stickleback (...
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Uncovering the genetic and evolutionary basis of local adaptation is a major focus of evolutionary biology. The recent development of cost-effective methods for obtaining high-quality genome-scale data makes it possible to identify some of the loci responsible for adaptive differences among populations. Two basic approaches for identifying putative...
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Geographic patterns of genetic variation within modern populations, produced by complex histories of migration, can be difficult to infer and visually summarize. A general consequence of geographically limited dispersal is that samples from nearby locations tend to be more closely related than samples from distant locations, and so genetic covarian...
Preprint
Full-text available
Geographic patterns of genetic variation within modern populations, produced by complex histories of migration, can be difficult to infer and visually summarize. A general consequence of geographically limited dispersal is that samples from nearby locations tend to be more closely related than samples from distant locations, and so genetic covarian...
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Invasive species perturb food webs, often decreasing resource availability for resident taxa. Low resource availability may interact with abiotic factors to restrict niches, particularly niche axes that influence metabolic demand. The San Francisco Estuary (SFE) provides a case study, as it has low phytoplankton concentrations, likely due to invasi...
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Substantial research has addressed adaptation of nonnative biota to novel environments, yet surprisingly little work has integrated population genetic structure and the mechanisms underlying phenotypic differentiation in ecologically important traits. We report on studies of the common milkweed Asclepias syriaca, which was introduced from North Ame...
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The interactions between organisms and their environments can shape distributions of spatial genetic variation, resulting in patterns of isolation by environment (IBE) in which genetic and environmental distances are positively correlated, independent of geographic distance. IBE represents one of the most important patterns that results from the wa...
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The emerging tick-borne pathogen Anaplasma phagocytophilum infects humans, domestic animals, and wildlife throughout the Holarctic. In the western US, the ecology of A. phagocytophilum is particularly complex, with multiple pathogen strains, tick vectors, and reservoir hosts. A recent phylogenetic analysis of A. phagocytophilum strains isolated fro...
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Populations can be genetically isolated both by geographic distance and by differences in their ecology or environment that decrease the rate of successful migration. Empirical studies often seek to investigate the relationship between genetic differentiation and some ecological variable(s) while accounting for geographic distance, but common appro...
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Discussions aimed at resolution of the Tree of Life are most often focused on the interrelationships of major organismal lineages. In this study, we focus on the resolution of some of the most apical branches in the Tree of Life through exploration of the phylogenetic relationships of darters, a species-rich clade of North American freshwater fishe...
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Full-text available
Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging tick-borne pathogen that infects humans, domestic animals and wildlife throughout the Holarctic. In the far-western United States, multiple rodent species have been implicated as natural reservoirs for A. phagocytophilum. However, the presence of multiple A. phagocytophilum strains has made it difficult to d...

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