Giada Tortorelli

Giada Tortorelli
University of Melbourne | MSD · Marine Microbial Symbiont Lab, School of BioSciences

PhD

About

13
Publications
1,873
Reads
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74
Citations
Citations since 2016
12 Research Items
73 Citations
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Introduction
My research focuses on the symbiosis between Cnidarian and  Symbiodinium  dinoflagellates that powers coral reefs, using the anemone  Exaiptasia pallida  as model organism to study corals. I am interested in the really initial steps during the establishment of this mutualistic association: my main aim is to dissect the molecular events that allow recognition between host and photosymbionts in the setup of symbiosis.
Additional affiliations
June 2021 - present
University of Melbourne
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • Cnidaria-Symbiodiniaceae & Alveolata symbioses
August 2020 - present
University of Melbourne
Position
  • Researcher
January 2017 - July 2017
University of Melbourne
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Define molecular events that allow cnidarian hosts to recognise and incorporate the correct algal symbiont
Education
January 2017 - January 2021
University of Melbourne
Field of study
  • Dissecting the establishment of the symbiotic partnership between algae and animals that powers coral reefs
March 2015 - December 2015
University of Bologna
Field of study
  • Coral Reproduction, Climate Change
October 2012 - March 2015
University of Bologna
Field of study
  • Biodiversity and Evolution

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Full-text available
Chromerids are a group of alveolates, found in corals, that show peculiar morphological and genomic features. These organisms are evolutionary placed in-between symbiotic dinoflagellates and parasitic apicomplexans. There are two known species of chromerids: Chromera velia and Vitrella brassicaformis. Here, the biochemical composition of C. velia c...
Article
Full-text available
The algal cell wall is an important cellular component that functions in defense, nutrient utilization, signaling, adhesion, and cell‐cell recognition — processes important in the cnidarian–dinoflagellate symbiosis. The cell wall of symbiodiniacean dinoflagellates is not well characterized. Here, we present a method to isolate cell walls of Symbiod...
Article
Full-text available
Symbiodiniaceae algae are often photosymbionts of reef-building corals. The establishment of their symbiosis resembles a microbial infection where eukaryotic pattern recognition receptors (e.g. lectins) are thought to recognize a specific range of taxon-specific microbial-associated molecular patterns (e.g. glycans). The present study used the sea...
Article
Full-text available
The sea anemone, Exaiptasia diaphana, previously known as Exaiptasia pallida or Aiptasia pallida, has become increasingly popular as a model for cnidarian-microbiome symbiosis studies due to its relatively rapid growth, ability to reproduce sexually and asexually, and symbiosis with diverse prokaryotes and the same microalgal symbionts (family Symb...
Article
Full-text available
The mutualistic symbiosis between cnidarians and photosynthetic dinoflagellates supports one of the most diverse ecosystems on the planet, coral reefs. Cnidarian-Symbiodiniaceae symbioses are broadly species-specific, but little is known about the mechanisms underpinning this specificity. Here, we explored the ability of three genotypes of the sea...
Preprint
To monitor Symbiodiniaceae uptake and measure their colonization rate in Exaiptasia diaphana, we extended the methods presented in earlier works by including a calibration curve that allows symbiont coverage to be expressed as in hospite cell density. Our approach takes advantage of fluorescent microscopy and symbionts red chlorophyll auto-fluoresc...
Article
Full-text available
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicted that ocean surface temperature will rise of 0.6–2.0°C by 2100. Ocean warming is expected to produce strong impacts on marine ecosystems such as coral reefs, affecting their physiological events including reproductive processes. To date, relatively few studies have examined the effects o...
Preprint
Full-text available
The sea anemone, Exaiptasia diaphana, commonly known as Exaiptasia pallida or Aiptasia pallida, has become increasingly popular as a model for cnidarian-microbiome symbiosis studies due to its relatively rapid growth, ability to reproduce sexually and asexually, and symbiosis with diverse prokaryotes and the same microalgal symbionts (family Symbio...
Preprint
To monitor Symbiodiniaceae uptake and measure their colonization rate in Exaiptasia pallida, we extended the methods presented in earlier works by including a calibration curve that allows symbiont coverage to be expressed as in hospite cell density. Our approach takes advantage of fluorescent microscopy and symbionts red chlorophyll auto-fluoresce...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Symbiosis is an evolutionary strategy that facilitates the survival of most species across a diversity of habitats. The foundation of coral reefs relies on the endosymbiosis between reef-building corals and photosynthetic dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium. The algae transfer up to 95% of their photosynthate to their host, promoting coral gr...
Poster
Full-text available
Initial host-symbiont recognition is constituted by a complex series of inter-partner molecular signalling events, also known as winnowing stages. This study aims to investigate the first steps in the establishment of symbiosis between the coral model Exaiptasia pallida and Symbiodinium dinoflagellates, using three main approaches.
Article
Coral age can be strictly related to size, but processes like fragmentation, fusion, and partial colony mortality can decouple this relationship. When these phenomena are negligible, such as in solitary corals, age-based growth and population dynamics models can be used. In this study, the population size, structure, and growth rates of the tempera...
Article
Full-text available
The variety of reproductive processes and modes among coral species reflects their extraordinary regeneration ability. Scleractinians are an established example of clonal animals that can exhibit a mixed strategy of sexual and asexual reproduction to maintain their populations. This study provides the first description of the annual reproductive cy...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
This Discovery Project seeks to unravel how symbioses between animals such as corals and anemones and symbiotic algae are established and nurtured.