Giacomo Guidali

Giacomo Guidali
IRCCS Centro San Giovanni di Dio, Fatebenefratelli, Brescia · Neurophysiology Lab

PhD in Neuroscience

About

9
Publications
1,420
Reads
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82
Citations
Introduction
I am a post-doctoral researcher at the Neurophysiology Lab of the IRCCS Istituto Centro San Giovanni di Dio Fatebenefratelli in Brescia, Italy. My expertise concerns the field of neuromodulation (and, in detail, transcranial magnetic stimulation), brain plasticity in sensorimotor systems, and memory. I achieve a PhD in Neuroscience investigating the plastic mechanisms that rule sensorimotor networks through the development of novel paired associative stimulation (PAS) protocols.
Additional affiliations
February 2021 - present
Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca
Position
  • Researcher
November 2017 - October 2020
Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca
Position
  • PhD Student
October 2016 - April 2017
Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca
Position
  • Post-Lauream apprentice
Education
November 2017 - January 2021
October 2014 - October 2016
Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca
Field of study
  • Clinical, Developmental and Neuropsychology
October 2011 - July 2014
Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca
Field of study
  • Psychological Sciences

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Background: Default mode network (DMN) dysfunction is well established in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and documented in both preclinical stages and at-risk subjects, thus representing a potential disease target. Multi-sessions of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) seem capable of modulating DMN dynamics and memory in healthy individu...
Article
In the early 2000s, a novel non-invasive brain stimulation protocol, the paired associative stimulation (PAS), was introduced, allowing to induce and investigate Hebbian associative plasticity within the humans’ motor system, with patterns resembling spike-timing-dependent plasticity properties found in cellular models. Since this evidence, PAS eff...
Article
Full-text available
Starting from the early 2000s, paired associative stimulation (PAS) protocols have been used in humans to study brain connectivity in motor and sensory networks by exploiting the intrinsic properties of timing-dependent cortical plasticity. In the last 10 years, PAS have also been developed to investigate the plastic properties of complex cerebral...
Article
Recent literature suggests that the primary somatosensory cortex (S1), once thought to be a low-level area only modality-specific, is also involved in higher-level, cross-modal, cognitive functions. In particular, electrophysiological studies have highlighted that the cross-modal activation of this area may also extend to visual Working Memory (WM)...
Article
Full-text available
Every day, we do things that cause effects in the outside world with little doubt about who caused what. To some, this sense of agency derives from a post hoc reconstruction of a likely causal relationship between an event and our preceding movements; others propose that the sense of agency originates from prospective comparisons of motor programs...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Associative plasticity, the neurophysiological bases of Hebbian learning, has been implied in the for- mation of the association between sensory and motor representations of actions in the Mirror Neuron System; however, such inductor role still needs empirical support. Objective/hypothesis: We have assessed whether Paired Associative St...
Article
Paired associative stimulation (PAS) protocols can be used to induce Hebbian plasticity in the human brain. A modified, cross-modal version, of the PAS (cross-modal PAS, cm-PAS) has been recently developed. The cm-PAS consists in the repetitive pairings of a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulse over the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) an...
Article
We developed and assessed the effects of a novel cross-modal protocol aimed at inducing associative (Hebbian-like) plasticity in the somatosensory cortical system through vision. Associative long-term potentiation can be induced in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) by means of paired associative stimulation (PAS), in which a peripheral electric...
Article
A wide range of human activities are performed sequentially in few seconds. We need to maintain a correct temporal order of words in language, movements in actions, directions in navigation, etc. Therefore, it is plausible, in a more economical perspective, that our brain is equipped with a dedicated mechanism for storing a temporal sequence for a...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I have to run a robust two-way repeated-measures ANOVA (in detail, a 2 X 3 design) with the package 'WRS2' on R (https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/WRS2/index.html). However, in the tutorial article, there are only guidelines for the one-way rmANOVA. Is it possible to run such rmANOVA (by instance, using the 't2way' function and related lines)?

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Investigate plasticity mechanisms which rule the genesis and functioning of mirror systems in human brain (tactile mirror system and motor mirror system) by means of novel TMS-Paired Associative Stimulation (PAS) protocols
Project
Investigate, with offline rTMS, if the Supramarginal Gyrus (SMG) could be implicated in the retention of order information in STM indipendently from the type of material presented