Giacomo Capuzzo

Giacomo Capuzzo
Université Libre de Bruxelles | ULB · Unit of Anthropology and Human Genetics

PhD in Prehistoric Archaeology (Archaeological Science)

About

49
Publications
20,454
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175
Citations
Introduction
I am a postdoctoral researcher in the Belgian EOS CRUMBEL project “Cremations, Urns and Mobility. Ancient Population Dynamics in Belgium“ at the Université Libre de Bruxelles. The main topic of my research is the use of radiocarbon dates and strontium isotopes in order to reconstruct the behaviour of past societies, providing thus information about phenomena like the adoption and spread of innovations, human mobility processes, socio-cultural changes, and demographic fluctuations at a European and regional scale.
Additional affiliations
September 2012 - December 2012
Weizmann Institute of Science
Position
  • Visiting student
September 2011 - October 2011
Naturhistorisches Museum Wien
Position
  • Visiting student
Education
January 2010 - July 2014
Autonomous University of Barcelona
Field of study
  • Prehistory
January 2006 - July 2009
University of Padova
Field of study
  • Prehistoric and Protohistoric Archaeology
September 2003 - December 2006
University of Padova
Field of study
  • Archaeology

Publications

Publications (49)
Article
Full-text available
The reconstruction of past demographic patterns is a fundamental step towards a better understanding of human-environment relations, especially in terms of quantifiable anthropic impact and population susceptibility to environmental changes. The recently developed Summed Calibrated Probability Distributions (SCPD) approach, based on large collectio...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores the changes that occurred in harvesting technology during the dispersal of the Neolithic in the Mediterranean basin. It does so through technological and use-wear analysis of flaked stone tools from archaeological sites dated between ca. 7000 and 5000 cal BCE, from the Aegean Sea to the westernmost coasts of Portugal. The main...
Article
Full-text available
The adoption of a new funerary ritual with all its social and cognitive meanings is of great importance to understanding social transformations of past societies. The first known occurrence of cremation in the territory corresponding to modern Belgium dates back to the Mesolithic period. From the end of the Neolithic onward, the practice of cremati...
Article
Full-text available
This study aims to better understand the development of group identity, mobility, and health in the Early Medieval Meuse Valley. This is achieved by combining existing demographic and palaeopathological information from 73 cremation deposits from Echt, the Netherlands, with new strontium isotope ratios (⁸⁷Sr/⁸⁶Sr) and strontium concentrations ([Sr]...
Article
The funerary Bronze Age culture in the Belgian part of the Meuse valley is poorly understood due to the challenging nature of cremation deposits that dominate the archaeological record. Only a few sites were analysed in that region, limiting the possibilities to reconstruct the development of Bronze Age populations in Belgium. Due to its good prese...
Article
Full-text available
The high temperatures reached during cremation lead to the destruction of organic matter preventing the use of traditional isotopic methods for dietary reconstructions. Still, strontium isotope (87 Sr/ 86 Sr) and concentration ([Sr]) analyses of cremated human remains offer a novel way to assess changing consumption patterns in past populations tha...
Article
Studies of funerary practices provide information about many aspects of death in past societies. However, only limited archaeological evidence documents the circumstances under which cremations occurred and the person(s) who were performing the funerary rituals. Lying at the border between Atlantic and Continental cultural traditions, the Scheldt a...
Article
Full-text available
Cremation is a complex mortuary practice, involving a number of activities of the living towards the dead before, during, and after the destruction of the bodily soft tissues by fire. The limiting information concerning these behavioral patterns obtained from the pyre remains and/or cremation deposits prevents the reconstruction of the handling of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The CRUMBEL project brings together researchers from three Belgian universities and the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage. The purpose of this collaboration is to study the Belgian archaeological collections of cremated bones dating from the Neolithic till the Merovingian period. Th e project aims to improve knowledge concerning the living cond...
Article
Objectives This study aims to increase the rate of correctly sexed calcined individuals from archaeological and forensic contexts. This is achieved by evaluating sexual dimorphism of commonly used and new skeletal elements via uni‐ and multi‐variate metric trait analyses. Materials and methods Twenty‐two skeletal traits were evaluated in 86 indivi...
Article
Objectives The Falys–Prangle‐method assesses age‐related morphological changes to the sternal clavicle end (SCE), enabling the observation of mature adults from the 5th decade onwards in unburnt human skeletal remains. The aim of this study is to investigate the applicability of the Falys–Prangle‐method on burnt human remains. Materials and method...
Article
Full-text available
From the Prehistory until the Late Middle Ages wood was the most important construction material for buildings in Flanders. With the exception of wet contexts, the wooden posts of the structures are not preserved anymore. Because of this, these buildings are difficult to date. Charcoal or charred grains preserved in these postholes are a dating opt...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
L’article suivant est un résumé des résultats préliminaires des crémations étudiées dans le cadre du projet CRUMBEL (Crémations, urnes et mobilité, la dynamique du peuplement de la Belgique - Projet EOS N°30999782) qui seront publiés dans une prochaine monographie dédiée au site de Pommeroeul.
Article
Full-text available
The CRUMBEL project aims to investigate the mobility of the former population in Belgium from the Neolithic period until the Early Middle Ages. To reach these research goals different topics will be studied. In a preliminary phase, the ancient collections of cremated bone will be documented. A selection of these funerary sites will be studied to un...
Conference Paper
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If post-cremation life histories of cremains and cremation-related deposits can be readily investigated as they refer to the last handling of the deceased, the treatment of the corpse during the burning act itself is little addressed by textual sources and often discussed in anthropological studies. Among the topics discussed are questions whether...
Chapter
Full-text available
Traces of past social actions preserved in the archaeological record are the material evidence necessary for reconstructing socio-economic models of prehistoric and proto-historic communities. Since the beginning of the 20th century, the concepts of facies and “culture” have been largely implemented by Italian archaeologists, mainly as a consequenc...
Conference Paper
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A partir de los trabajos de Pere Bosh Gimpera, padre de la arqueología catalana, uno de los temas claves del debate protohistórico en el nordeste peninsular ha sido el estudio de la llamada "cultura de los Campos de Urnas" caracterizada por la difusión a nivel europeo de la costumbre de quemar los difuntos y depositar sus restos óseos en una urna f...
Conference Paper
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Tanto las recientes excavaciones arqueológicas llevadas a cabo en la última década, como los avances en el desarrollo de técnicas estadísticas para el análisis de los contextos fechados por radiocarbono, han generado la necesidad de tomar en consideración uno de los elementos clave de la cultura material en la Edad del Bronce de la Península Ibéric...
Article
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This paper discusses the current state of research on harvesting technologies of the first farming communities of the central and western Mediterranean area between ca. 6000–5900 cal BC and 4800–4700 cal BC. New data obtained from the analysis of almost 40 sites from the Italian Peninsula is compared with data previously collected from the Iberian...
Chapter
Full-text available
Survival or Event History Analysis is a set of statistical methods for examining not only event occurrence but also the timing of events. These methods were developed for studying death – hence the name ‘survival’ analysis – and have been used extensively for that purpose in the social sciences and ecology; however, they can also be successfully ap...
Conference Paper
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This research paper focuses on the space-time distribution of handles with vertical expansion as relevant time-marker. The typological seriation of these artefacts proposed by some authors (Barril Vicente, Ruiz Zapatero 1980; Espejo Blanco 2000-2001) for North-Eastern Spain and the interesting results achieved thanks to the PhD of the first author...
Article
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The Bronze Age in prehistoric Europe represents a perfect case study for analyzing phenomena of cultural change and adoption of innovation in small-scale societies. Specifically, we focus on the large-scale introduction and development of the cremation rite in the second millennium BC. Traditionally, the origin of the so-called ‘Urnfield culture’ h...
Chapter
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In this contribution we present the design phase of an ABM implemented to understand how cultural identities and cultural standardization may have emerged in a prehistoric sedentary early complex society. The aim of the model is to explain how diversity and self-identification may have emerged in the small-scale societies of our prehistoric past. T...
Article
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Traces of past social actions, detectable in the archaeological record, are the material evidence through which we can infer social and economic patterns of ancient societies. These categories can be investigated in both time and space using a probabilistic statistical approach. In an attempt to quantify the results of archaeological processes we d...
Article
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The chronological framework of European protohistory is mostly a relative chronology based on typology and stratigraphic data. Synchronization of different time periods suffers from a lack of absolute dates; therefore, disagreements between different chronological schemes are difficult to reconcile. An alternative approach was applied in this study...
Conference Paper
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La reciente publicación de la Base de Dataciones Radiocarbónicas de Cataluña realizada por el Museo de Arqueología de Cataluña y el Laboratorio de Arqueología Cuantitativa de la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona representa un gran avance para la investigación arqueológica en Cataluña. De hecho, la asociación de informaciones estratigráficas, cronol...
Article
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The Bronze Age/Iron Age transition in Prehistoric Europe represents a perfect case study to test different and competing hypotheses of social dynamics and economic change in small-scale societies. The paper discusses the possibilities of modeling what could have happened in Europe between 1800 and 800 bc, in terms of spatiotemporal dynamics. The pa...
Conference Paper
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Databases constitute a fundamental element for archaeological heritage management. Our project examine analytical techniques based on AI technologies, Bayesian statistics and semantic web, to link different databases and integrate data dispersed in hundreds of different files and servers in one operative system. We explore conceptual background for...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Databases constitute a fundamental element for archaeological heritage management. Our project pretends to examine analytical techniques based on technologies of artificial intelligence, Bayesian statistics to link different archaeological data bases and integrate in one operative system data disseminated in hundreds of different files and servers....

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The CRUMBEL project studies the collections of cremated bone found in Belgium dating from the Neolithic to the Early-Medieval period using state of the art analytical and geochemical analyses. Recording the Belgian collections in a database including as much osteoarchaeological information represents a crucial part of this project. Until now the dominance of cremation as funeral practice between 3000 BC and 700 AD in Northern Europe led to limited information on migrations and living conditions. CRUMBEL will greatly improve our current understanding of how people lived in Belgium. https://www.crumbel.org/