Gesa Weyhenmeyer

Gesa Weyhenmeyer
Uppsala University | UU · Department of Ecology and Genetics

Professor
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About

179
Publications
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12,287
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Publications

Publications (179)
Preprint
Lakes located in the boreal region are generally supersaturated with carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), which emerges from inflowing inorganic carbon from the surrounding watershed and from mineralization of allochthonous organic carbon. While these CO 2 sources gained a lot of attention, processes that reduce the amount of CO 2 have been less studied. We the...
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In recent decades, lakes have experienced unprecedented ice loss with widespread ramifications for winter ecological processes. The rapid loss of ice, resurgence of winter biology, and proliferation of remote sensing technologies, presents a unique opportunity to integrate disciplines to further understand the broad spatial and temporal patterns in...
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Lakes are significant emitters of methane to the atmosphere, and thus are important components of the global methane budget. Methane is typically produced in lake sediments, with the rate of methane production being strongly temperature dependent. Local and regional studies highlight the risk of increasing methane production under future climate ch...
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Human-induced salinization caused by the use of road deicing salts, agricultural practices, mining operations, and climate change is a major threat to the biodiversity and functioning of freshwater ecosystems. Yet, it is unclear if freshwater ecosystems are protected from salinization by current water quality guidelines. Leveraging an experimental...
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Increasing iron (Fe) concentrations are found in lakes on a wide geographical scale but exact causes are still debated. The observed trends might result from increased Fe loading from the terrestrial catchment, but also from changes in how Fe distributes between the water column and the sediments. To get a better understanding of the causes we inve...
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Human-induced salinization increasingly threatens inland waters; yet we know little about the multifaceted response of lake communities to salt contamination. By conducting a coordinated mesocosm experiment of lake salinization across 16 sites in North America and Europe, we quantified the response of zooplankton abundance and (taxonomic and functi...
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Millions of lakes inversely stratify during winter. Seemingly subtle variations in the duration of winter stratification can have major ecological effects by, for example, altering the vertical distribution of oxygen and nutrients in lakes. Yet, the influence of climate change on winter stratification has been largely unexplored. To fill this knowl...
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Long‐term lake ice phenological records from around the Northern Hemisphere provide unique sensitive indicators of climatic variations, even prior to the existence of physical meteorological measurement stations. Here, we updated ice phenology records for 60 lakes with time‐series ranging from 107–204 years to provide the first re‐assessment of Nor...
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The solubility and behavior of iron (Fe) in natural waters is tightly linked to Fe speciation, and Fe speciation likely influences how Fe distributes between the water column and sediments. In this study, the function of a lake as an Fe sink, with focus on the role of Fe speciation, was assessed for Lake Bolmen in southern Sweden. We found that a l...
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Climate change and other anthropogenic stressors have led to long-term changes in the thermal structure, including surface temperatures, deepwater temperatures, and vertical thermal gradients, in many lakes around the world. Though many studies highlight warming of surface water temperatures in lakes worldwide, less is known about long-term trends...
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The concentration of dissolved oxygen in aquatic systems helps to regulate biodiversity1,2, nutrient biogeochemistry3, greenhouse gas emissions4, and the quality of drinking water5. The long-term declines in dissolved oxygen concentrations in coastal and ocean waters have been linked to climate warming and human activity6,7, but little is known abo...
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Lake surfaces are warming worldwide, raising concerns about lake organism responses to thermal habitat changes. Species may cope with temperature increases by shifting their seasonality or their depth to track suitable thermal habitats, but these responses may be constrained by ecological interactions, life histories or limiting resources. Here we...
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One of the most important physical characteristics driving lifecycle events in lakes is stratification. Already subtle variations in the timing of stratification onset and break-up (phenology) are known to have major ecological effects, mainly by determining the availability of light, nutrients, carbon and oxygen to organisms. Despite its ecologica...
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Annual maximum lake surface temperature influences ecosystem structure and function and, in particular, the rates of metabolic activities, species survival and biogeography. Here, we evaluated 50 years of observational data, from 1966 to 2015, for ten European lakes to quantify changes in the annual maximum surface temperature and the duration abov...
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Plain Language Summary Most mid and high latitude lakes are seasonally ice‐covered and have only been classified based on the thermal structure and trophic status during the open‐water season in summer. However, limited temperatures observations in these ice‐covered lakes suggest that there is a wide range of thermal structures over winter. We deve...
Article
Winter activities on ice are culturally important for many countries, yet they constitute a high safety risk depending upon the stability of the ice. Because consistently cold periods are required to form stable and thick ice, warmer winters could degrade ice conditions and increase the likelihood of falling through the ice. This study provides the...
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Globally, lake surface water temperatures have warmed rapidly relative to air temperature, but changes in deepwater temperatures and vertical thermal structure are still largely unknown. We have compiled the most comprehensive data set to date of long-term (1970-2009) summertime vertical temperature profiles in lakes across the world to examine tre...
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During recent decades, increasing anthropogenic activities have affected natural ionic composition, including the strongest and most common relationship between ionic concentrations in the majority of natural global freshwaters, i.e., the Ca²⁺-ANC (acid neutralizing capacity) equilibrium. Using long-term monitoring data and MAGIC modelling, we eval...
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Carbon dioxide (CO 2) uptake by phytoplankton can significantly reduce the partial pressure of CO 2 (pCO 2) in lakes and rivers, and thereby CO 2 emissions. Presently, it is not known in which inland waters on Earth a significant pCO 2 reduction by phytoplankton is likely. Since detailed, comparable carbon budgets are currently not available for mo...
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Understanding the mechanisms driving carbon dioxide (CO 2) concentrations in inland waters is important to foresee CO 2 responses to environmental change, yet knowledge gaps persist regarding which processes are the key drivers. Here we investigated possible drivers across 13 Swedish lakes and streams where the partial pressure of CO 2 (pCO 2) has...
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Large lakes of the world are habitats for diverse species, including endemic taxa, and are valuable resources that provide humanity with many ecosystem services. They are also sentinels of global and local change, and recent studies in limnology and paleolimnology have demonstrated disturbing evidence of their collective degradation in terms of dep...
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Metabolic stoichiometry predicts that dissolved oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) in aquatic ecosystems should covary inversely; however, field observations often diverge from theoretical expectations. Here, we propose a suite of metrics describing this O2 and CO2 decoupling and introduce a conceptual framework for interpreting these metrics wit...
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Groundwater is an essential resource providing water for societies and sustaining surface waters. Although groundwater at intermediate depth could be highly influential at regulating lake and river surface water chemistry, studies quantifying organic and inorganic carbon (C) species in intermediate depth groundwater are still rare. Here, we quantif...
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Climate change is not only about changes in means of climatic variables such as temperature, precipitation and wind, but also their extreme values which are of critical importance to human society and ecosystems. To inspire the Swedish climate research community and to promote assessments of international research on past and future changes in extr...
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The cryosphere (including, snow, glaciers, permafrost, lake and river ice) is an integral element of high mountain regions, which are home to roughly 10% of the global population. Widespread cryosphere changes affect physical, biological and human systems in the mountains and surrounding lowlands, with impacts evident even in the ocean. Building on...
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People extensively use lakes and rivers covered by seasonal ice. Although ice cover duration has been declining over the past 150 years for Northern Hemisphere freshwaters, we know relatively little about how ice loss directly affects humans. Here, we synthesize the cultural ecosystem services (i.e., services that provide intangible or nonmaterial...
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Calcium (Ca) is an essential element for almost all living organisms. Here, we examined global variation and controls of freshwater Ca concentrations, using 440 599 water samples from 43 184 inland water sites in 57 countries. We found that the global median Ca concentration was 4.0 mg L−1 with 20.7% of the water samples showing Ca concentrations ≤...
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The annual minimum of lake surface water temperature influences ecological and biogeochemical processes, but variability and change in this extreme have not been investigated. Here, we analysed observational data from eight European lakes and investigated the changes in annual minimum surface water temperature. We found that between 1973 and 2014,...
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Damming alters carbon processing along river continua. estimating carbon transport along rivers intersected by multiple dams requires an understanding of the effects of cascading impoundments on the riverine metabolism. We analyzed patterns of riverine metabolism and phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll a; Chla) along a 74.4-km river reach intersecte...
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Many surface waters across the boreal region are browning due to increased concentrations of colored allochthonous dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Browning may stimulate heterotrophic metabolism, may have a shading effect constraining primary production, and may acidify the water leading to decreased pH with a subsequent shift in the carbonate syst...
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The partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in lake water, and thus CO2 emissions from lakes are controlled by hydrologic inorganic carbon inputs into lakes, and in-lake carbon transformation (mainly organic carbon mineralization and CO2 uptake by pri-mary producers). In boreal lakes, CO2 uptake by phytoplankton is often considered to be of minor importance...
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Ice provides a range of ecosystem services—including fish harvest¹, cultural traditions², transportation³, recreation⁴ and regulation of the hydrological cycle⁵—to more than half of the world’s 117 million lakes. One of the earliest observed impacts of climatic warming has been the loss of freshwater ice⁶, with corresponding climatic and ecological...
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Climate change studies have long focused on effects of increasing temperatures, often without considering other simultaneously occurring environmental changes, such as browning of waters. Resolving how the combination of warming and browning of aquatic ecosystems affects fish biomass production is essential for future ecosystem functioning, fisheri...
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Lakes are vital components of the landscape that provide important ecosystem services. They act as sentinels of change, integrating information from atmospheric, terrestrial, and hydrological processes. To support sustainable lake management, lakes must be monitored to provide physical, chemical, and biological information. Monitoring strategies ra...
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In the Arctic, rising seawater temperatures and increasing underwater light caused by reductions in sea ice cover are expected to change the structure of arctic marine communities. Substantial, sometimes sudden, increases in macroalgal productivity and biomass have already been observed in arctic rocky bottom communities. These macroalgal responses...
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The Nordic Centre of Excellence CRAICC (CRyosphere-Atmosphere Interactions in a Changing Arctic Climate), funded by NordForsk in the years 2011–2016, was the largest joint Nordic research and innovation initiative to date, aiming to strengthen research and innovation regarding climate change issues in the Nordic Region. CRAICC gathered more than 10...
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In 2017, the dominant greenhouse gases released into Earth's atmosphere-carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide-reached new record highs. The annual global average carbon dioxide concentration at Earth's surface for 2017 was 405.0 ± 0.1 ppm, 2.2 ppm greater than for 2016 and the highest in the modern atmospheric measurement record and in ice cor...
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Northern ecosystems are experiencing some of the most dramatic impacts of global change on Earth. Rising temperatures, hydrological intensification, changes in atmospheric acid deposition and associated acidification recovery, and changes in vegetative cover are resulting in fundamental changes in terrestrial-aquatic biogeochemical linkages. The ef...
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Riise G., Müller R.A., Haaland S. & Weyhenmeyer G.A. 2018: Acid rain-a strong external driver that has suppressed water colour variability between lakes. Boreal Env. Res. 23: 69-81. Increasing water colour observed in lakes in the northern hemisphere is frequently explained by several factors, including the decrease in acid deposition, climate chan...
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Low-order streams are suggested to dominate the atmospheric CO2 source of all inland waters. Yet, many large-scale stream estimates suffer from methods not designed for gas emission determination and rarely include other greenhouse gases such as CH4. Here we present a compilation of directly measured CO2 and CH4 concentration data from Swedish low-...
Poster
CO2 emissions from lakes are a significant carbon flux to the atmosphere and an important part of the global carbon cycle. The amount of carbon transferred from lakes to the atmosphere is determined by the hydrologic inorganic carbon inflow to lakes and by in-lake CO2 dynamics consisting mainly of mineralization of allochthonous organic carbon (OC)...
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Recent reports of increasing iron (Fe) concentrations in freshwaters are of concern, given the fundamental role of Fe in biogeochemical processes. Still, little is known about the frequency and geographical distribution of Fe trends, or about the underlying drivers. We analyzed temporal trends of Fe concentrations across 340 water bodies distribute...
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Lakes (including reservoirs) are an important component of the global carbon (C) cycle, as acknowledged by the 5th assessment report of the IPCC. In the context of lakes, the boreal region is disproportionately important contributing to 27% of the worldwide lake area, despite representing just 14% of global land surface area. In this study, we used...
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Ch 7. Regional Climates: f. Europe and the Middle East