Gerlind U C Lehmann

Gerlind U C Lehmann
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin | HU Berlin · Department of Biology

Prof. Dr. rer. nat.

About

121
Publications
26,864
Reads
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1,455
Citations
Introduction
Behavioural Physiology, Behavioural Ecology, Acoustic Communication, Mating systems: especially nuptial gifts, autonomous Acoustic monitoring of biodiversity Behavioural experiments, bioacoustic, neurophysiology and neuroanatomy, isotope analysis Model organisms: Insects: bushcrickets (Ensifera: Tettigoniidae), grasshoppers (Caelifera), acoustic orienting parasitoid flies (Tachinidae: Ormiini)
Additional affiliations
September 2017 - present
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Position
  • Professor
April 2012 - September 2017
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Position
  • Senior Researcher
April 2012 - present
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Position
  • Senior Researcher

Publications

Publications (121)
Article
Full-text available
Rapid divergence in external genital structures occurs in nearly all animal groups that practice internal insemination; explaining this pattern is a major challenge in evolutionary biology. The hypothesis that species‐specific differences in male genitalia evolved under sexual selection as courtship devices to influence cryptic female choice (CFC),...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract In most species with internal fertilization, male genitalia evolve faster than other morphological structures. This holds true for genital titillators, which are used exclusively during mating in several bushcricket subfamilies. Several theories have been proposed for the sexual selection forces driving the evolution of internal genitalia,...
Article
Full-text available
Insect declines and biodiversity loss have attracted much attention in recent years, but lack of comprehensive data, conflicting interests among stakeholders and insufficient policy guidance hinder progress in preserving biodiversity. The project DINA (Diversity of Insects in Nature protected Areas) investigates insect communities in 21 nature rese...
Article
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National and local governments need to step up efforts to effectively implement the post‐2020 global biodiversity framework of the Convention on Biological Diversity to halt and reverse worsening biodiversity trends. Drawing on recent advances in interdisciplinary biodiversity science, we propose a framework for improved implementation by national...
Article
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In Germany, the decline of insect biomass was observed in nature conservation areas in agricultural landscapes. One of the main causal factors discussed is the use of synthetic pesticides in conventional agriculture. In a Germany-wide field study, we collected flying insects using Malaise traps in nature conservation areas adjacent to agricultural...
Article
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Im Kontext des Insektenrückgangs und landwirtschaftlicher Nutzung als einem bedeutenden Verursacher kommt Naturschutzgebieten und den FFH-Gebieten des europäischen Natura-2000-Netzes eine wach- sende Bedeutung zum Erhalt der lokalen Biodiversität zu, die sich auch auf Ackerbiotope bezieht. Eine Raumanalyse im Rahmen des Forschungs- projektes DINA (...
Article
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Open science approaches enable and facilitate the investigation of many scientific questions in bioacoustics, such as studies on the temporal and spatial evolution of song, as in vocal dialects. In contrast to previous dialect studies, which mostly focused on songbird species with a small repertoire, here we studied the common nightingale (Luscinia...
Preprint
Full-text available
The declines observed in insect abundance and diversity in the past decades has also been observed in plants, and these events are most certainly correlated. Rapid largescale biomonitoring of both plants and insects can help monitor these changes and inform decisions for land management and species protection. Malaise traps have been used for nearl...
Article
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[DE] Die systematische Erfassung und Analyse von Biodiversitätsdaten und Ökosystemleistungen ist unerlässlich. Sie trägt zum Verständnis von Ursachen des Biodiversitätsverlusts bei und wird zur Analyse von Trends sowie zur Evaluierung von Interventionsmaßnahmen und politischen Strategien benötigt. Ehrenamtliche Datenerhebungen und wissenschaft- lic...
Article
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Today, integrative taxonomy is often considered the gold standard when it comes to species recognition and delimitation. Using the Tetrix bipunctata complex, we here present a case where even integrative tax-onomy may reach its limits. The Tetrix bipunctata complex consists of two morphs, bipunctata and kraussi, which are easily distinguished by a...
Article
We adopt an allometric framework of scaling relationships for comparison between mating-related traits in the middle European bushcricket Roeseliana roeselii (Hagenbach, 1822). Eight characters, covering ontogenetic fitness (size traits; fixed at final moult), male condition (mass traits) and mating motivation (reproductive behaviours), were analys...
Article
In acoustically communicating bushcrickets (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae), most signal properties are influenced by the dimensions of the stridulatory apparatus, which in turn reflects body size and condition of the signaller. Females can assess male quality based on acoustic signals, suggesting that male stridulatory structures may be under sexual se...
Article
In many species, males produce sounds to attract a female. In a chorus, males actively adjust their acoustic production depending on the presence and number of mating rivals. Plasticity in signal features might then be advantageous as males could tune their signalling activity to the contest intensity. However, the ability to exhibit plastic behavi...
Poster
Full-text available
Insects follow other organisms in their strong biodiversity crisis. Along with the long-observed species-loss recent studies provide evidence for a dramatic reduction in insect biomass in Germany (Hallmann et al. 2017 PLOSone). The alarming data have elicited broad media cover and forced politics to request more conclusive studies. Our project DINA...
Article
Full-text available
In sexual reproduction, the search for mating partners elevates the individual's risks of predation and parasitism. One way to increase mate search effectiveness and reduce search costs is acoustic signaling. However, acoustic orienting parasitoid flies exploit singing hosts, leading to high parasitism rates. Aggregations of males and females at ma...
Article
Full-text available
In sexual reproduction, the search for mating partners elevates the individual’s risks of predation and parasitism. One way to increase mate search effectiveness and reduce search costs is acoustic signaling. However, acoustic orienting parasitoid flies exploit singing hosts, leading to high parasitism rates. Aggregations of males and females at ma...
Article
Full-text available
Males of the bushcricket Metrioptera roeselii bear paired titillators that are spiny genital structures supposedly functioning as copulatory courtship devices. During copulation, the male inserts its titillators into the female's genital chamber, where they rhythmically tap on the sensilla-covered dorsal surface of the genital fold. Here, we invest...
Article
Full-text available
Males of several animals, including insects, use acoustic signals to attract a sexually receptive conspecific partner. In the orthopteran chorusing genus Poecilimon (Tettigoniidae), male signalling as well as female preference can be related to male body condition and to the social environment. Song is thought to be an honest signal of male quality...
Article
Full-text available
1. Functional wing polymorphism in insects is an intriguing topic, especially with respect to the adaptive advantage of each wing morph. The common pygmy grasshopper in Germany, Tetrix subulata, displays wing polymorphism skewed towards macropterous (LW) individuals capable of flight. Furthermore, T. subulata is known to undergo adult diapause in w...
Article
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The data in the Table 1 of the original version of this article were inadvertently shifted during the editing process. Therefore the entries as published in this table did not correspond to their correct data.
Article
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The possession of wings and ability to fly are a unifying character of higher insects, but secondary loss of wings is widespread. Within the bushcrickets, the subfamily Phaneropterinae (Orthoptera: Tettigonioidea) comprises more than 2000 predominantly long-winged species in the tropics. However, the roughly 300 European representatives are mainly...
Presentation
In bushcrickets, sexual selection is related to sound and songs are honest signals. The same acoustic cues can be used to identify singing abilities of neighbors and quality of mating partners by competing males and choosing females.
Conference Paper
The males of some bushcricket species have sclerotized genitalia, which are moved rhythmically during copulations. These spiny “titillators” vary greatly in their shape depending on the species, suggesting that they are under sexual selection. Bushcricket titillators were thought to function as stimulators for the females or to be used as anchors,...
Poster
Full-text available
Many insects use acoustic signals to attract mates. During song contests, the asymmetry between rivals presenting different quality or different resource holding potential (RHP) may determine who will be the winner. An individual can decide to persist or give up the fight, using signals to assess the RHP of his opponent in comparison to its own. In...
Article
Full-text available
Animal genitalia are diverse and a growing body of evidence suggests that they evolve rapidly under post-copulatory sexual selection. This process is predicted to be more intense in polyandrous species, although there have been very few comparative studies of the relationship between the complexity of genital structures in males and measures of the...
Article
Full-text available
Nuptial gifts are male mating investments, which, in bushcrickets, comprise the sperm-containing ampulla and the attached spermatophylax. The functions of the spermatophylax are to deter females from premature removal of the sperm-containing ampulla, which is a nutrient resource for females, as well as a source of compounds that influence female be...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The males of some bushcricket species have spiny "titillators", which are moved rhythmically during copulations. These genital appendices are species specific, suggesting that they are under sexual selection. So far, the titillators were thought to stimulate the females or to be used as anchors, to hold on the females during copulations. However, t...
Article
Full-text available
In a recently published paper on colour polymorphism in a Pygmy grasshopper from China (Zhao et al 2016) an unidentified Paratettix sp. was misidentified as Tetrix bolivari. This case highlights the need for correct species identification and provides an opportunity to recommend some aspects of Good Taxonomic Practice (GTP) in Tetrigidae to reduce...
Article
Full-text available
Male genital organs are among the fastest evolving morphological structures. However, large parts of the male’s genitalia are often hidden inside the female during mating. In several bushcricket species, males bear a pair of sclerotized genital appendices called titillators. By employing synchrotron-based in vivo X-ray cineradiography on mating...
Article
Full-text available
We present a DNA barcoding study on the insect order Orthoptera that was generated in collaboration between four barcoding projects in three countries, viz. Barcoding Fauna Bavarica (Germany), German Barcode of Life, Austrian Barcode of Life, and Swiss Barcode of Life. Our dataset includes 748 COI sequences from 127 of the 162 taxa (78.4%) recorded...
Article
Full-text available
The majority of bushcricket species (Insecta: Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) use acoustic signals for mate attraction. Song production and the sound-producing structures, therefore, can be argued to be under sexual selection. The sound-producing structures might determine differences in the acoustic parameters of male songs, like the fundamental freque...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
It is believed that animal genitalia evolve rapidly under sexual selection. Males develop sclerotised copulatory organs in various bushcricket families. Across species these titillators exhibit a great variability like seen in other genital structures. Additional mating traits like refractory period and polyandry are also very different in bushcric...
Poster
Full-text available
Body size in many species indicates male’s quality. In bushcrickets the sound generating apparatuses and thereby the acoustic signals emitted may be influenced by body size. In Poecilimon ampliatus (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae), the calls are produced only by males, which rub together the forewing structures scraper and teeth. The body mass of the si...
Poster
Full-text available
Our result cannot support the hypothesis of postcopulatory sexual selection being a driver for male bushcricket genitalia evolution.
Poster
Full-text available
Bushcricket titillators have diverse functions depending on the species, they could stimulate females to suppress female resistance and assure proper spermatophore attachment; in one species they have an anchoring function.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction Animal genitalia are believed to evolve rapidly under sexual selection. In some bushcricket families, males possess sclerotised copulatory organs. Like other genitalic structures, these bushcricket titillators show considerable variation across species. Bushcrickets also vary widely in mating traits like polyandry and refractory period...
Article
Full-text available
Providing nutritional gifts to females during mating is common in several insect species. Although nuptial gifts are well known in the bushcrickets, the specific way in which females use spermatophore material is unclear. In previous research, we found that a portion of the spermatophore is used for body homeostasis in the hours following mating. O...
Article
Full-text available
In most bushcricket species, the male transfers a nuptial gift to the female during mating, consisting of a gelatinous spermatophylax attached to the paired ampulla with the sperm. The spermatophylax acts as a sperm protection device; during its consumption, the sperm are transferred into the female’s spermatheca. Males of the bushcricket Letana in...
Article
Full-text available
Lehmann, A.W. Klatt, R., Landeck, I., Machatzi, B., Hennigs, S., Brauner, O., Oldorff, S. & Lehmann, G.U.C. (2016): Fokusarten für die Erfassung zur Gefährdungsanalyse der Heuschrecken (Orthoptera) in Brandenburg und Berlin. Articulata 31: 23-44.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Differential investment of the sexes into mating and reproduction leads to unbalanced costs and benefits in bushcrickets (Lehmann 2012). In many species nuptial gifts are transferred during courtship and mating. Nuptial gifts are materials provided by a donor to a recipient during courtship or copulation in order to improve donor fitness (Lewis et...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In many Ensiferan species spermatophores as nuptial gifts are transferred to female bushcrickets during mating. The spermatophore consists of a nutritious spermatophylax and paired ampulla, containing the sperm. The spermatophylax acts as a sperm protection device, while the female consumes it, sperm wander into the female’s spermatheca. Additional...
Article
Full-text available
Males of certain bushcrickets (Orthoptera: Ensifera: Tettigoniidae) possess sclerotized internal genital devices termed titillators. These titillators are paired chitinized structures for which the function remains to be completely determined. We studied the role of the titillators during copulation in the bushcricket Metrioptera roeselii (Hagenbac...
Article
Full-text available
Genitalia are rapidly evolving morphological structures most likely under sexual selection. Due to their internal nature they are often hidden inside the body, thus morpho-functional studies of animal genitalia are broadly lacking. Males of some bushcricket taxa bear paired genital appendices called titillators, the exact function of which is unkno...
Article
Full-text available
Dimorphism in wing length is well known in many insect species. In those species a trade-off exists between dispersal capability and reproduction, with the long-winged (LW) morph being a better disperser due to superior flight capability. The short-winged (SW) morph is less mobile and it is hypothesised that females of this morph can invest more en...
Article
Full-text available
Two taxa of parasitoid Diptera have independently evolved tympanal hearing organs to locate sound producing host insects. Here we review and compare functional adaptations in both groups of parasitoids, Ormiini and Emblemasomatini. Tympanal organs in both groups originate from a common precursor organ and are somewhat similar in morphology and phys...
Article
Full-text available
Acoustic emissions of animals serve communicative purposes and most often contain species-specific and individual information exploitable to listeners, rendering bioacoustics a valuable tool for biodiversity monitoring. Recording bioacoustic signals allows reproducible species identification. There is a great need for increased use and further deve...
Article
Full-text available
Uniquely positioned at the intersection of sexual selection, nutritional ecology and life-history theory, nuptial gifts are widespread and diverse. Despite extensive empirical study, we still have only a rudimentary understanding of gift evolution because we lack a unified conceptual framework for considering these traits. In this opinion piece, we...
Data
Full-text available
AMIBIO AmiBio concept: The AmiBio project constructs and deploys autonomous multi-sensor monitoring stations and automatically analyzes their transmitted meas-urements, for long-term monitoring of biodiversity activity trends in the region of Hymettus, a mountainous area located at the eastern periphery of Athens. The acoustic monitoring stations,...
Article
Full-text available
When it comes to species coexistence, ecologists and evolutionary biologists both emphasize that there is some interference between taxa and this interference might be more enhanced in closely related species (Gröning and Hochkirch 2008, Pfennig and Pfennig 2009, Grether et al. 2009). Ecological interference may prevent or influence the coexistence...