Gergely Horváth

Gergely Horváth
Eötvös Loránd University · Department of Systematic Zoology and Ecology

PhD

About

38
Publications
3,485
Reads
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133
Citations
Citations since 2017
29 Research Items
120 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
Introduction
Assistant Prof at Behavioural Ecology Group, Dept of Syst Zool and Ecol, ELTE. My research interest revolves around evolutionary ecology of behavioural consistency, in particular, evolutionary potential of between- and within-individual behavioural variation.
Additional affiliations
September 2015 - November 2019
Eötvös Loránd University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 2012 - August 2015
September 2006 - July 2012
University of Szeged
Field of study
  • Ecology, Hidrobiology

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
Full-text available
Several factors can influence individual and group behavioral variation that can have important fitness consequences. In this study, we tested how two habitat types (seminatural meadows and meadows invaded by Solidago plants) and factors like colony and worker size and nest density influence behavioral (activity, meanderness, exploration, aggressio...
Article
Full-text available
Aggregation (gathering together) and sheltering (hiding in cover) are basic behaviours that can reduce the risk of predation. However, both behaviours have costs, such as increased competition over resources and high prevalence of contact-spread parasites (aggregation) or lost opportunities for foraging and mating (sheltering). Therefore, variation...
Article
Full-text available
Behavioural innovativeness is important for colonising new habitats; however, it is also costly. Along the colonisation event of a simple, stable and isolated habitat offering only new food sources, one could hypothesize that the colonising individuals are more innovative than the average in their source population, showing preference to the new re...
Article
Full-text available
Populations experiencing negligible predation pressure are expected to evolve higher behavioural activity. However, when sexes have different expected benefits from high activity, the adaptive shift is expected to be sex-specific. Here, we compared movement activity of one cave (lack of predation) and three adjacent surface (high and diverse predat...
Article
Full-text available
Behaviour is considered among the most important factors in colonising new habitats. While population divergence in behaviour is well-documented, intraspecific variation in exploratory behaviour in species with populations successfully colonising and adapting to extreme (compared to the ‘typical’) habitats is less understood. Here, by studying surf...
Article
Full-text available
Aggregation (gathering together) and sheltering (hiding in cover) are basic behaviours that can reduce the risk of predation. However, both behaviours have costs, such as increased competition over resources and high prevalence of contact-spread parasites (aggregation) or lost opportunities for foraging and mating (sheltering). Therefore, variation...
Preprint
Full-text available
Aggregation (gathering together) and sheltering (hiding in cover) are basic behaviours that might reduce the risk of predation. However, both behaviours have costs, like increased competition over resources and high prevalence of contact-spread parasites (aggregation) or lost opportunities for foraging and mating (sheltering). Therefore, adaptive v...
Article
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
Aggression is one of the most frequently studied behavioural traits across a wide range of taxa; however, most studies evaluate aggressive behaviour in a social context, in which aggressive interactions between conspecifics are motivated by resource control (offensive or social aggression). However, in an antipredator context, the primary role of a...
Article
Full-text available
Mechanisms affecting consistent interindividual behavioral variation (i.e., animal personality) are of wide scientific interest. In poikilotherms, ambient temperature is one of the most important environmental factors with a direct link to a variety of fitness‐related traits. Recent empirical evidence suggests that individual differences in boldnes...
Article
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Article
Full-text available
Behavioral innovation is a key process for successful colonization of new habitat types. However, it is costly due to the necessary cognitive and neural demands and typically connected to ecological generalism. Therefore, loss of behavioral innovativeness is predicted following colonization of new, simple, and invariable environments. We tested thi...
Article
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Article
Full-text available
Differences in both stable and labile state variables are known to affect the emergence and maintenance of consistent interindividual behavioral variation (animal personality or behavioral syndrome), especially when experienced early in life. Variation in environmental conditions experienced by gestating mothers (viz. nongenetic maternal effects) i...
Article
Full-text available
Most studies on animal personality evaluate individual mean behaviour to describe individual behavioural strategy, while often neglecting behavioural variability on the within-individual level. However, within-individual behavioural plasticity (variation induced by environment) and within-individual residual variation (regulatory behavioural precis...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the background mechanisms affecting the emergence and maintenance of consistent between-individual variation within population in single (animal personality) or across multiple (behavioural syndrome) behaviours has key importance. State-dependence theory suggests that behaviour is ‘anchored’ to individual state (e.g. body condition, g...
Data
Results of LMMs on activity and risk taking. F statistics (numerator and denominator df in parentheses) and P values are shown. Significant effects are in bold font. SVL = snout to vent length; basking = basking time treatment; food = food treatment. (DOCX)
Data
Results of GLMs on predictability of activity and risk taking in the pooled sample and in the different treatment groups. First, we ran separate GLMs on the pooled sample with all possible interactions for activity predictability and risk-taking predictability. Second, based on the highest order significant interaction for the given behaviour, we r...
Data
Change in body weight of adult male European green lizards (Lacerta viridis) between the low- and high food treatment groups. Body weight change is represented by group specific means of individual slopes. 95% confidence intervals are shown. (TIF)
Data
Snout to vent length (SVL) and body weight of the assessed adult male European green lizards (Lacerta viridis). (XLSX)
Data
Activity and risk-taking of the assessed adult male European green lizards (Lacerta viridis). Raw data are shown. (XLSX)
Article
Full-text available
It has been proposed recently that labile state variables (e.g. energy reserves) can have a key role in the development and maintenance of consistent between-individual behavioural variation (i.e. animal personality) within population. In male Carpetan rock lizards (Iberolacerta cyreni), the provitamin D3 component of femoral gland secretion acts a...
Article
Identifying evolutionary and developmental mechanisms underlying consistent between-individual differences in behaviour is the main goal in ‘animal personality studies’. Here, we explored whether activity and risktaking varied consistently between individuals and correlated to various – potentially fitness linked – male traits in Carpetan rock liza...
Article
Consistent individual differences within (animal personality) and across (behavioural syndrome) behaviours became well recognised during the past decade. Nevertheless, our knowledge about the evolutionary and developmental mechanisms behind the phenomena is still incomplete. Here, we explored if risk-taking and exploration were consistent and linke...
Article
Full-text available
Abundance, phenology, sex ratio, emergence pattern, mortality and larval emergence behaviour of riverine dragonflies (Odonata: Gomphidae) were studied at the Lower-Tisza reach at Szeged (168–173 rkm) during the emergence period in 2011. Three 20 meter long sampling sites were chosen and searched systematically for exuviae, dead specimens and dragon...
Article
Full-text available
The paper presents faunistical data on dragonflies collected (larvae, exuviae and adults) and observed (adults) in the inundation (active and ancient floodplain) area of River Tisza along both sides between settlements Csongrád and Röszke. The fieldwork was carried out in water bodies and their margins. Collections and observations were made in thr...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The biological and evolutionary importance of behavioural consistency (between-individual variation in a single and across multiple behaviours) is amongst the most vigorously studied topic in the field of behavioural ecology. Behavioural consistency is usually described by individual mean behaviour (i.e. behavioural type), however, this statistical approach entirely neglects behavioural variation on the next level: within-individual. Recently, a growing body of empirical data suggest non-random between-individual variation in environmentally induced behavioural change (i.e. behavioural plasticity) and non-environmentally induced behavioural precision (i.e. behavioural predictability), however, studies on these components of behavioural variation is rather scarce, and our understanding on their evolutionary and ecological importance are insufficient. We aimed to study whether within-individual behavioural variation is under selection per se, further, whether environmental complexity and differences in certain environmental factors affect its components.
Project
Our goal is to identify and study environmental and individual state-linked mechanisms shaping within- and between-individual behavioural variation in two European lacertid species, European green lizard (Lacerta viridis) and Carpetane rock lizard (Iberolacerta cyreni).