Gerardo Martin

Gerardo Martin
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México | UNAM · Escuela Nacional de Estudios Superiores unidad Mérida

BVSc, MSc, PhD

About

27
Publications
9,149
Reads
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643
Citations
Citations since 2017
21 Research Items
550 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
Introduction
Gerardo Martin is an Associate Professor at the Escuela Nacional de Estudios Superiores Unidad Mérida, UNAM. Gerardo does research in eco-epidemiological modelling, applied and spatial ecology.
Additional affiliations
August 2007 - February 2010
Institute of Ecology INECOL
Position
  • Master's Student
August 2006 - January 2007
Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust
Position
  • Student

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Snakebite affects more than 1.8 million people annually. Factors explaining snakebite variability include farmers’ behaviors, snake ecology and climate. One unstudied issue is how farmers’ adaptation to novel climates affect their health. Here we examined potential impacts of adaptation on snakebite using individual-based simulations, focusing on s...
Article
Full-text available
Snakebite is the only WHO-listed, not infectious neglected tropical disease (NTD), although its eco-epidemiology is similar to that of zoonotic infections: envenoming occurs after a vertebrate host contacts a human. Accordingly, snakebite risk represents the interaction between snake and human factors, but their quantification has been limited by d...
Article
Contrasting outcomes of statistical modelling methods for the same data may represent critical pieces of information about the biological process. Ecological niche and species distribution modelling are notorious for their keenness on algorithm testing although differences between method outcomes are seldom used to gain biological insight. Here we...
Article
Full-text available
Despite important implications for human health, distribution, abundance and behaviour of most medically‐relevant snakes remain poorly understood. Such data deficiencies hamper efforts to characterise the causal pathways of snakebite envenoming and to prioritise management options in the areas at greatest risk. We estimated the spatial patterns of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Snakebite is the only WHO-listed, not infectious neglected tropical disease (NTD), although its eco-epidemiology is similar to that of zoonotic infections: envenoming occurs after a vertebrate host contacts a human. Accordingly, snakebite risk represents the interaction between snake and human factors, but their quantification has been limited by d...
Article
Full-text available
Snakebite envenoming is a set of intoxication diseases that disproportionately affect people of poor socioeconomic backgrounds in tropical countries. As it is highly dependent on the environment its burden is expected to shift spatially with global anthropogenic environmental (climate, land use) and demographic change. The mechanisms underlying the...
Article
Full-text available
Snakebite causes more than 1.8 million envenoming cases annually and is a major cause of death in the tropics especially for poor farmers. While both social and ecological factors influence the chance encounter between snakes and people, the spatio-temporal processes underlying snakebites remain poorly explored. Previous research has heavily focuse...
Article
Full-text available
Correlative estimates of fundamental niches are gaining momentum as an alternative to predict species’ abundances, particularly via the abundant niche-centroid hypothesis (an expected inverse relationship between species’ abundance variation across its range and the distance to the geometric centroid of its multidimensional ecological niche). The m...
Article
Full-text available
Animal movement has direct applications in spatial management and conservation planning, yet it is rarely taken into account for the design of natural protected areas. For instance, reef shark species are thought to benefit from marine protected area networks, even though their movement behaviour remains poorly characterized. Poor understanding of...
Article
Full-text available
In Australia, the cane toad Rhinella marina and chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) are examples of invasive species that have had dramatic impacts on native fauna. However, little is known about the interaction between Bd and cane toads. We aimed to explore the interaction of these 2 species in 3 parts. First, we collated data from...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental persistence of zoonotic pathogens is a key trait that influences the probability of zoonotic spillover. Pathogen survival outside of the host determines the window available for contact with the new recipient host species and the dose of pathogen available to that host. The longer a pathogen survives in the environment, the more disco...
Article
Full-text available
Disease risk mapping is important for predicting and mitigating impacts of bat-borne viruses, including Hendra virus (Paramyxoviridae:Henipavirus), that can spillover to domestic animals and thence to humans. We produced two models to estimate areas at potential risk of HeV spillover explained by the climatic suitability for its flying fox reservoi...
Data
Hendra virus spillover: a bimodal system driven by climatic factors (Supplementary materials) Modelling distance to bat camps and distance to niche centroid Presence records of FF are an incomplete account of the total number of camps present in Australia, even more so if we account for temporal scales. To fill these gaps we developed a model that...
Data
Desiccation rates can be estimated with potential evaporation. Evaporation in turn can be calculated with relative humidity and temperature data. Absolute humidity is the mass of water per cubic metre of air (kg/m 3), and the difference between absolute humidity and absolute humidity at saturation is the potential for evaporation (McDevitt et al.,...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding environmental factors driving spatiotemporal patterns of disease can improve risk mitigation strategies. Hendra virus (HeV), discovered in Australia in 1994, spills over from bats (Pteropus sp.) to horses and thence to humans. Below latitude − 22°, almost all spillover events to horses occur during winter, and above this latitude spil...
Article
Full-text available
The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae), is an invasive species and a vector of numerous human pathogens, including chikungunya, dengue, yellow fever, and Zika viruses. This mosquito had been reported from 36 geographic locations in Mexico by 2005, increasing to 101 locations by 2010 and 501 locations (spanning 16 st...
Article
Full-text available
Infectious diseases are transmitted when susceptible hosts are exposed to pathogen particles that can replicate within them. Among factors that limit transmission, the environment is particularly important for indirectly transmitted parasites. To try and assess a pathogens’ ability to be transmitted through the environment and mitigate risk, we nee...
Article
Full-text available
Hendra virus is a paramyxovirus of Australian flying fox bats. It was first detected in August 1994, after the death of 20 horses and one human. Since then it has occurred regularly within a portion of the geographical distribution of all Australian flying fox (fruit bat) species. There is, however, little understanding about which species are most...
Article
Full-text available
Hendra virus (HeV) is lethal to humans and horses and little is known about its epidemiology. Biosecurity restrictions impede advances, particularly on understanding pathways of transmission. Quantifying HeV's environmental survival can be used for making decisions and to infer transmission pathways. We estimated HeV survival with a Weibull distrib...
Article
Full-text available
Viruses that originate in bats may be the most notorious emerging zoonoses that spill over from wildlife into domestic animals and humans. Understand-ing how these infections filter through ecological systems to cause disease in humans is of profound importance to public health. Transmission of viruses from bats to humans requires a hierarchy of en...

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