• Home
  • Géraldine Coppin
Géraldine Coppin

Géraldine Coppin
UniDistance Suisse · Psychology

Professor

About

52
Publications
14,510
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,019
Citations
Introduction
I obtained my Ph.D. in psychology at the University of Geneva (2008-2012). I was then a postdoctoral fellow at Pierce Laboratory, Yale University (2012-2014), and the Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research (2014-2015). I work at the University of Geneva as a Senior Researcher/Lecturer in Psychology (2015-2020). Since 2018 I am a Professor in Psychology at the Swiss Distance University Institute. I study the psychology and neurosciences of olfactory and flavor perception.
Additional affiliations
September 2015 - present
University of Geneva
Position
  • Senior Researcher
September 2014 - August 2015
Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2012 - August 2014
Yale University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (52)
Preprint
Background/Objectives: Obesity is a complex condition and the mechanisms involved in weight gain and loss are poorly understood. Liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, has been demonstrated to successfully promote weight loss in patients with obesity (OB). Yet, it is unclear whether the observed weight loss is driven by an alteration of food reward...
Article
Background/objectives: Self-reported smell loss is a prominent symptom of COVID-19 infection and a potentially useful clinical tool for remote pre-screening of this disease. However, pre-existing chemosensory dysfunction with obesity may diminish the usefulness of self-reported smell loss in this vulnerable group. Here we aim to compare COVID-19 r...
Article
Full-text available
Gustometers have made it possible to deliver liquids in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) settings for decades, and mouthpieces are a critical part of these taste delivery systems. Here, we propose an innovative 3D-printed fMRI mouthpiece inspired by children's pacifiers, allowing human participants to swallow while lying down in an MRI...
Article
Full-text available
The extent to which a nasal whiff of scent can exogenously orient visual spatial attention remains poorly understood in humans. In a series of seven studies, we investigated the existence of an exogenous capture of visual spatial attention by purely trigeminal (i.e., CO 2 ) and both olfactory and trigeminal stimuli (i.e., eucalyptol). We chose thes...
Preprint
Full-text available
Gustometers have allowed the delivery of liquids in fMRI settings for decades and mouthpieces are a critical part of those taste delivery systems. Here we propose an innovative 3D printed mouthpiece inspired by children's pacifiers that allow participants to swallow while lying down in an MRI scanner. Our results validate the effectiveness of our m...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background/objectives Individuals with obesity show alterations in smell and taste abilities. Smell and taste loss are also the most prominent neurological symptoms of COVID-19, yet how chemosensory ability present in individuals with obesity with a positive COVID-19 diagnosis is unknown. Subjects/Methods In this secondary analysis of a cross-sect...
Article
Many factors influence emotional responses evoked by wines. Here we assessed how self-reported wine expertise, tasting condition (blind vs. informed) as well as sensitivity to key information about wines (e.g., reputation, price, grape variety) impact the subjective affective responses they evoked. We measured subjective affective responses of high...
Chapter
We hope this chapter will provide an overview on current theoretical approaches to emotion and its measurement, without neglecting their historical roots. Simultaneously, our goal is to bring the major conceptual foundations for the work described in the following chapters. We have grouped theories of emotion in three families, a taxonomy grounded...
Article
Full-text available
Olfactory and gustatory stimuli can elicit potent emotional responses and are essential in food perception. Yet, main theories of emotion often under-represent them, and our understanding of affective phenomena relies mostly on experimental studies conducted on visual and auditory stimuli. Although evidence is still accumulating today, recent findi...
Article
Diabetes self-management (DSM) is a process based on a series of complex learnings. The conceptualization of the role of the emotional dimensions that underlie and structure this process is critical to better understand why living with diabetes can become a burden. A clinical case illustrates the intertwining of the affective and cognitive dimensio...
Article
Full-text available
Odors are strong elicitors of affect, and they play an important role in guiding human behavior, such as avoiding fire or spoiled food. However, little is known about how risky decision making changes when stimuli are olfactory. We investigated this question in an experimental study of risky decision making with unpleasant odors and monetary losses...
Article
The peak-end rule predicts that retrospective evaluations of affective events heavily depend on their most intense and last moment and imply duration neglect. It was originally proposed for negative experiences such as painful medical procedures. It is unclear, however, to what degree it also applies to positive experiences. Previously, rigorous co...
Article
The extent to which automatic associations exist between relaxing and energizing feelings and odors is unclear. To investigate this question, we used a modified version of the Implicit Association Test. In this task, participants had to make speeded discrimination responses between stimuli and words related to energizing vs. relaxing feelings. Thes...
Article
Full-text available
Obesity is associated with a diverse array of cognitive and affective deficits, among which impairments in food valuation and choices have received increasing attention. The neural underpinnings of such impairments, however, remain poorly understood, partly because a complete understanding of these processes under normal conditions has yet to be ac...
Article
Post-ingestive signals conveying information about the nutritive properties of food are critical for regulating ingestive behavior. Here, using an auction task concomitant to fMRI scanning, we demonstrate that participants are willing to pay more for fat + carbohydrate compared with equally familiar, liked, and caloric fat or carbohydrate foods and...
Article
Full-text available
Besides hormonal regulation of appetite and satiety, food intake depends on the activity of certain brain systems. Functional imaging studies are useful to better understand this central regulation of energy intake. Obesity is associated with increased brain responses to food stimuli at the level of the reward system. More specifically, studies hav...
Article
We report the case of a 27-year-old female who presented with a peculiar story of anosmia fluctuating in a circadian manner. Olfactory function appeared an hour after breakfast, was normal during daytime, and disappeared in the early evening. Imaging confirmed chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Initial systemic, followed by topical steroid treatment, ra...
Article
Throughout human history, food consumption has been deeply tied to cultural groups. Past models of food preference have assumed that social concerns are dissociated from basic appetitive qualities—such as tastiness—in food choice. In contrast to this notion, we tested and found support for the novel idea that social identities can shape the evaluat...
Article
Full-text available
Luxury conveys values of quality and rarity and holds a particular emotional meaning. Yet, studies conducted on the impact of contextual information of luxury on emotional responses to products remain scarce. In this study, we tested whether contextual information, in particular evoking luxury, could influence emotional responses to perfumes, which...
Preprint
Throughout human history, food consumption has been deeply tied to cultural groups. Past models of food preference have assumed that social concerns are dissociated from basic appetitive qualities—such as tastiness—in food choice. Providing a counter to this notion, we tested and found support for the novel idea that social identities can shape the...
Article
This commentary focuses on the mechanisms underlying the appraisal of food insecurity. I first describe what appraisal is and why it plays a major role in explaining how different individuals consider food supply as more or less secure. I then describe the potential reciprocal links between appraisal and obesity, based on the well-documented eviden...
Chapter
This chapter advocates for adopting a theoretical and experimental approach that goes beyond the use of valence as the most interesting dimension in emotional reaction to odors. Although valence is a dominant dimension of odor perception, limiting the description of emotional response to positive versus negative (valence) and activating versus calm...
Chapter
We begin this introductory chapter by presenting some of the different definitions of emotion. We detail the consensual view of emotion, which is to consider emotion as a multicomponent phenomenon (ie, composed of an expression, action tendency, bodily reaction, feeling, and cognitive appraisal). We then describe each of these components, the diffe...
Article
Full-text available
There is extensive evidence that social identities can shape people’s attitudes and behavior, but what about sensory judgments? We examined the possibility that social identity concerns may also shape the judgment of non-social properties—namely, olfactory judgment. In two experiments, we presented Swiss and non-Swiss participants with the odor of...
Article
Extensive research has investigated societal and behavioral consequences of social group affiliation and identification but has been relatively silent on the role of perception in intergroup relations. We propose the perceptual model of intergroup relations to conceptualize how intergroup relations are grounded in perception. We review the growing...
Article
Full-text available
In our target article, we proposed the Perceptual Model of Intergroup Relations (PMIR) to conceptualize the role of perception in intergroup relations (Xiao, Coppin, & Van Bavel, this issue). According to the model, social identity can alter information processing across perceptual modalities (visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory and gustatory perc...
Article
Full-text available
Emotions are characterized by synchronized changes in several components of an organism. Among them, physiological variations provide energy support for the expression of approach/avoid action tendencies induced by relevant stimuli, while self-reported subjective pleasantness feelings integrate all other emotional components and are plastic. Conseq...
Article
Full-text available
Sniffing, namely the active sampling of olfactory information through the nasal cavity, is part of the olfactory percept. It is influenced by stimulus properties, affects how an odor is perceived, and is sufficient (without an odor being present) to activate the olfactory cortex. However, many aspects of the affective correlates of sniffing behavio...
Article
Full-text available
The mere exposure phenomenon refers to improvement of one’s attitude toward an a priori neutral stimulus after its repeated exposure. The extent to which such a phenomenon influences evaluation of a priori emotional stimuli remains under-investigated. Here we investigated this question by presenting participants with different odours varying in a p...
Article
Full-text available
Overeating behaviors are nowadays a worldwide issue, and cumulative evidence shows that stress induces excessive pursuit of highly palatable food. However, the role of stress in this effect remains poorly understood. The classic interpretation is that excessive eating is an attempt to reduce the aversive feeling associated with the stress response...
Article
Full-text available
Obesity has been associated with impaired executive functions including working memory. Less explored is the influence of obesity on learning and memory. In the current study we assessed stimulus reward association learning, explicit learning and memory and working memory in healthy weight, overweight and obese individuals. Explicit learning and me...
Article
Full-text available
This commentary focuses on the bidirectional links between unconscious influences and decision making. In particular, it examines the extent to which awareness is (not) necessary to the impact of decisions on psychological processes such as preferences. This analysis might help researchers to gain an extended perspective of Newell & Shanks' (N&S's)...
Article
Full-text available
The free-choice paradigm (Brehm, 1956) is a widely used paradigm in psychology. It has been used to show that after a choice between two similarly pleasant stimuli, the pleasantness of the chosen one tends to increase, whereas the pleasantness of the rejected one tends to decrease-a spreading of alternatives. However, the methodological validity of...
Article
This chapter presents main contemporary theories and concepts of emotion such as basic emotion theories, bidirectional theories of emotion and appraisal theories of emotion. For each major current theory, the chapter presents its premise, its main assumptions and its characteristics as well as the criticisms that have been aimed at it. There is hug...
Article
This chapter focuses on the importance of the flexibility of chemosensory preferences and how and to what extent they can be modulated. Chemosensory preferences refer to preferences regarding odors, flavors, and tastes. The valuation of any sensory stimulus depends on a number of factors, some of them shared across sensory modalities, others more t...
Article
Full-text available
Preferences are traditionally assumed to be stable. However, empirical evidence such as preference modulation following choices calls this assumption into question. The evolution of such postchoice preference over long time spans, even when choices have been explicitly forgotten, has so far not been studied. In two experiments, we investigated this...
Article
Full-text available
Shall I go see a movie tonight, or rather buy some Chinese food? Obviously, such choices between different classes of goods ("reward types") are conceptually complex and methodologically challenging to investigate. Yet, they occur frequently in everyday life. How, then, does the brain solve such problems? The view that diverse behavioral acts and s...
Article
Full-text available
Neuroeconomic research has delineated neural regions involved in the computation of value, referring to a currency for concrete choices and decisions ('economic value'). Research in psychology and sociology, on the other hand, uses the term 'value' to describe motivational constructs that guide choices and behaviors across situations ('core value')...
Article
Full-text available
Values are motivational constructs that determine what is important to us and which goals we choose to pursue. Cross-cultural research suggests that the structure of the human value system is universal, but people and cultures differ in terms of relative value priorities. Differences in psychological value hierarchies can be parsimoniously describe...
Article
Full-text available
Several studies have shown that preferences can be strongly modulated by cognitive processes such as decision making and choices. However, it is still unclear whether choices can influence preferences of sensory stimuli implicitly. This question was addressed here by asking participants to evaluate odors, to choose their preferred odors within pair...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the effects of odors on appraisal processes and consequent emotional responses. The main goal was to test whether an odor is detected as novel or familiar before it is evaluated as pleasant or unpleasant. Participants performed a recognition task in which they were presented with pairs of unpleasant or pleasant odors (sample and tar...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Health education for diabetic patients, type 1 and 2 through a social interaction perspective in didactical devices in Swiss context. This project has a double aim: a) Firstly, understand the nature of the barriers that sometimes prevent people living with diabetes from acquiring the knowledge and practices regulating diabetes management. In this sens, a study of different didactic methods used for the therapeutic education of people living with diabetes is an occasion to comprehend this process. This project seeks to identify, within the interaction between caregiver and patient, the didactic difficulties encountered by the caregivers, the possible misunderstandings on the objects treated by the therapeutic education and the solutions constructed according to the interactions; This project aims to understand patient education for diabetic patients, type 1 and 2, through a social interaction perspective in educational settings in Swiss context. This aim is doubly articulate: a) Firstly, understand the nature of the barriers that sometimes prevent people living with diabetes from acquiring the knowledge and practices regulating diabetes management. In this sense, a study of different educational methods used for the therapeutic education of people living with diabetes is an occasion to comprehend this process. This project seeks to identify, within the interaction between caregiver and patient, the educational difficulties encountered by the caregivers, the possible misunderstandings on the objects treated by the therapeutic education and the solutions constructed according to the interactions; b) On the other hand, to invite caregivers to take a reflexive look at their practices by asking them to comment on their own practices and discuss them with another caregiver involved in patient education. Research therefore also aims at professional development through a method that places caregivers in the position of observers of their practices and is therefore likely to lead them to develop it.