Georgia M Hart-Fredeluces

Georgia M Hart-Fredeluces
Idaho State University | ISU

Doctor of Philosophy

About

21
Publications
17,247
Reads
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479
Citations
Citations since 2017
12 Research Items
395 Citations
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Introduction
Georgia M Hart-Fredeluces currently works at the Department of Sociology at Idaho State University and was formerly studying in the Department of Botany, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Her research is focused on social-ecological systems, including describing and modeling adaptive capacity under changing conditions.

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Understanding how plant populations respond to multiple drivers is increasingly critical for biodiversity conservation under global change. Indigenous knowledge can provide guidance for sustainable management, but the outcome of its application in novel ecosystems is rarely known. Simulating the re‐introduction of Indigenous stewardship in contempo...
Article
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Understanding how multiple simultaneous drivers interact to influence plant demography is critical for protecting plant diversity in the context of global change. Fire is a key disturbance in forested ecosystems, but the interactive effects of fire and other abiotic and management factors on understory plants are poorly understood. Beargrass (Xerop...
Article
Full-text available
Globally, a majority of people use plants as a primary source of healthcare and introduced plants are increasingly discussed as medicine. Protecting this resource for human health depends upon understanding which plants are used and how use patterns will change over time. The increasing use of introduced plants in local pharmacopoeia has been expla...
Article
Full-text available
Ethnobotany has evolved from a discipline that largely documented the diversity of plant use by local people to one focused on understanding how and why people select plants for a wide range of uses. This progress has been in response to a repeated call for theory-inspired and hypothesis-driven research to improve the rigor of the discipline. Despi...
Article
Full-text available
Wild-gathered seaweeds (limu) are a prominent component of Native Hawaiian diet andculture, but are understudied for their nutritional benefits and contemporary cultural use. Thisstudy uses a combination of ethnographic, pharmacological, and ecological approaches todocument contemporary levels of wild seaweed gathering and consumption, and it explo...
Article
Indigenous ecologies have persisted through major social and ecological changes including settler colonialism. Adaptations have been a necessary part of this resilience, however little attention has been given to the consequences of these adaptations for Indigenous Peoples and ecologies. Without exploring these consequences, we are left with an inc...
Article
Full-text available
Unlabelled: Participatory approaches to science and decision making, including stakeholder engagement, are increasingly common for managing complex socio-ecological challenges in working landscapes. However, critical questions about stakeholder engagement in this space remain. These include normative, political, and ethical questions concerning wh...
Data
Introduced medicinal plants with cultivation status. (PDF)
Data
Richness of native and introduced species by province. (PDF)
Data
Treatment target categories and search criteria. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
The island of Kaua'i, Hawai'i has several remaining populations of endangered, endemic Hawaiian petrels (Pterodroma sandwichensis) and Newell's shearwaters (Puffinus newelli) that would be threatened by the presence of predatory mongooses (Herpestes javanicus). Despite over 200 putative sightings, 1 road-kill and 2 recent captures, it is not clear...
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Full-text available
Across the globe, biodiversity loss is occurring at an unprecedented rate. Rare species are especially susceptible to extinction, given that they typically have small population sizes and restricted geographic ranges, are less adaptable to disturbances, and are greater habitat specialists. However, while rare species may be prone to extinction, it...
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Full-text available
Contemporary Gathering Practice and Antioxidant Benefit of Wild Seaweeds in Hawai’i. Wild-gathered seaweeds (limu) are a prominent component of Native Hawaiian diet and culture, but are understudied for their nutritional benefits and contemporary cultural use. This study uses a combination of ethnographic, pharmacological, and ecological approaches...
Article
Full-text available
The majority of species in ecosystems are rare, but the ecosystem consequences of losing rare species are poorly known. To understand how rare species may influence ecosystem functioning, this study quantifies the contribution of species based on their relative level of rarity to community functional diversity using a trait-based approach. Given th...
Article
Full-text available
The seed bank records the plant-life history of the prairie and is a source of regeneration following disturbance. Prairie flora have adapted and evolved unique responses to the periodic presence of fire. In order to determine the effects of burning on the seed bank and the prairie in general, we germinated soil samples from burned and unburned plo...
Article
Full-text available
The co-occurrence of several dimensions of resource separation between coexisting consumers strengthens the hypothesis that the separation arose from and/or ameliorates interspecific competition. The two most common pollinators of the California endemic plant Clarkia xantiana ssp. xantiana (Onagraceae), the bees Hesperapis regularis (Mellitidae) an...
Article
Under many circumstances pollinators are expected to practice positive frequency–dependent foraging in colour-polymorphic plant populations. Theory suggests, however, that competition for floral resources might favor negative frequency–dependent foraging by some pollinator species, possibly contributing to the maintenance of flower colour variation...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
Bi-directional training for Native and University researchers in developing, negotiating, and maintaining respectful and reciprocal research relationships. funded under an NSF EPSCoR Workforce Development Grant. Spring 2022.
Project
Current collaborative research project examining the historical and contemporary power dynamics informing research relationships between Native American tribes and universities, with special focus on level of Native control of the research process.