George Siopis

George Siopis
Deakin University · School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences

BSc Hons MNutrDiet PhD

About

31
Publications
2,089
Reads
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242
Citations
Citations since 2016
28 Research Items
227 Citations
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Introduction
George is an Executive Dean Health Research Fellow at the Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition at Deakin University
Additional affiliations
August 2017 - present
The University of Sydney
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2007 - July 2008
University of Cambridge
Position
  • MRC sholar
Description
  • Attempted to crystallise the domain III of the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Internal Ribosomal Entry Site (IRES) for X-ray crystallography studies
June 2006 - August 2006
University of Cambridge
Position
  • summer scholar
Description
  • Investigated the domain III of the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Internal Ribosomal Entry Site (IRES) using NMR
Education
August 2017 - August 2020
The University of Sydney
Field of study
  • Science
February 2010 - December 2012
The University of Sydney
Field of study
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
October 2006 - June 2007
University of Surrey
Field of study
  • Neuroscience

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
Full-text available
Obesity prevalence continues to increase worldwide, with significant associated chronic disease and health cost implications. Among more recent innovations in health service provision is the use of text messaging for health behaviour change interventions including weight management. This review investigates the efficacy of weight management program...
Article
Accumulating data emphasize a strong link between obesity and the severity of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), including mortality. Obesity interferes with several components of the immune system including lymphoid tissue's integrity, leukocytes' development and function, complement system's activation, and the coordination of innate and adapti...
Article
Full-text available
The global population is living longer, however not everyone ages at the same rate in regard to their physical and cognitive abilities and their vulnerability to certain diseases and death. This review aimed to synthesise the contribution of biological age-predictive biomarkers to nutrition research and highlight the implications for future researc...
Article
Full-text available
The Feel4Diabetes study recruited 12,193 children (age: 8.20 ±1.01 years) and their parents from six European countries as part of the broader attempt to prevent type 2 diabetes. The current work collected data pre-intervention to identify the prevalence of childhood obesity by country and describe its association with socio-demographic characteris...
Article
Type 2 diabetes affects an estimated 1.5 million Australians,¹ with a current annual economic burden in excess of $15 billion.² Diabetes prevalence rates follow those of obesity and increase with age,³ predicting further future increases in prevalence considering the continuing rising trend of obesity⁴ and the ever-increasing ageing population.
Article
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has to date resulted in more than 200 million cases and more than four million deaths. Following a few months of hiatus, as part of the initial response to the pandemic, professional sporting activities resumed throughout the world. To ensure a safe return-to-play, the effects of SARS-CoV...
Article
Aims This systematic review aimed to evaluate the quality of dietary assessment methods in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) focusing on people with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and its impact on the favourability of conclusions. Research Methods & Procedures MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and CENTRAL were searched, from inception until September 2019 for R...
Article
Full-text available
To date more than 100 people over the age of 105 years old have recovered from COVID-19. With age being acknowledged as a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality from COVID-19, this article discusses possible reasons for their survival.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Objectives Diet is critical in diabetes management and new nutritional interventions are continuously being tested in randomized controlled trials. However, to make meaningful conclusions about the efficacy of dietary treatments, it is critical to be certain that the participants adhered to the dietary intervention and the dietary changes are valid...
Thesis
Nutrition therapy is central to the management of type 2 diabetes and Accredited Practising Dietitians have the expertise to best deliver this type of health care. Yet, some people with type 2 diabetes never consult with a dietitian. This research used a mixed-methods approach to assess the effectiveness of dietetic services and to elucidate the en...
Article
Diet is central to the management of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and better outcomes are achieved when the dietary intervention is delivered by a dietitian. Yet, many people with T2D never see a dietitian. It has been proposed that doctors prefer to provide the dietary advice themselves or rely on medication to treat their patients instead of referring t...
Article
Background Diet is central to treatment of type 2 diabetes. This review aimed to compare the effectiveness of nutrition therapy delivered by dietitians to nutrition advice delivered by other healthcare professionals in adults with type 2 diabetes on metabolic parameters. Methods Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsychINFO were searched...
Article
The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has reportedly resulted in more than one and a half million deaths worldwide. Although it was initially proposed that people of older age and those with certain medical conditions are at higher risk of adverse outcomes, including death, a plethora of people that have markedly surpassed the average li...
Article
Objective To describe the experiences and perspectives of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) regarding dietetic services and to suggest improvements for their access and delivery. Design Semistructured telephone interviews. Setting Urban and rural Australia. Participants A total of 30 English-speaking adults with T2DM recruited by means...
Article
Background The management of diabetes costs in excess of $1.3 trillion per annum worldwide. Diet is central to the management of type 2 diabetes. It is not known whether dietetic intervention is cost effective. This scoping review aimed to map the existing literature concerning the cost effectiveness of medical nutrition therapy provided by dietiti...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Diet is central to treatment of type 2 diabetes. This review aimed to compare the effectiveness of nutrition therapy delivered by dietitians to nutrition advice delivered by other healthcare professionals in adults with type 2 diabetes on metabolic parameters. Methods Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsychINFO were searched...
Poster
Full-text available
This ePoster was presented in June 2020 at the annual conference of the American Society for Nutrition (ASN), the "Nutrition 2020". Initially planned to take place in Seattle USA, this conference was rendered virtual due to COVID-19, attracting 29,598 registrants from 164 countries.
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Nutrition therapy is crucial for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Preliminary data indicate that nutrition therapy delivered by accredited dietitians achieves better clinical outcomes than when delivered by other healthcare professionals. We compared dietetic intervention provided by accredited dietitians with nutrition advice provided...
Article
Full-text available
Aims: Dietetic intervention improves glycaemic control of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of this study was to explore the views of Australian dietitians with respect to the nutritional management of people with T2DM, patient access to dietitians and any suggested improvements for access to and delivery of dietetic services. Methods: Se...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Dietetic intervention delivered by Accredited Practising Dietitians is demonstrated to improve clinical outcomes of type 2 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to assess the accessibility to dietetic intervention for people with type 2 diabetes in Australia. Methods: Prevalence data and dietitian workforce distribution data were sourc...
Thesis
Full-text available
The human PER (hPER) gene reporter constructs were created and the subcellular localization of the various human PER proteins was systematically analyzed, either individually or in all possible combinations, using HuH7 cells (human hepatoma cell line) as an experimental system. It was found that whereas hPER1 and hPER2 can individualy readily trans...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
According to the Editorial Manager online system, my manuscript is "With the Editor" since February.
I find that this is a very long time (more than 4 months) to be sitting with the editor, without any peer review.
I have tried to contact the journal as well as the Editor in Chief and other members of the editorial board via using the journal's online correspondence system, and independent email addresses for all editors and members of the editorial board that I could find.
I have not received a response despite multiple efforts over 3 months.
I do not wish to withdraw the manuscript in the case that it may be undergoing peer review (although I doubt it is) and I do not want to submit it elsewhere at the same time as it is unethical.
Could anyone help with how I can get in contact with someone from the journal re the status of my manuscript?
Question
With the daily updates on COVID-19 cases and deaths, I am trying to understand the algorithm behind the assignment of the cause of death.
I was wondering how doctors evaluate and assign the cause of death?
E.g. if someone has a heart attack, following COVID-19 infection (while they are infected - not post recovery) and this person had metabolic syndrome (let's say all dyslipidemia, hypertension and hyperglycaemia) how to we make a decision if the cause death is COVID-19 or diabetes or cardiovascular disease?
To me the guideline given for the assignment of COVID-19 death in Australia seems to have an inherent bias towards COVID-19:
"As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 death is defined for surveillance purposes as a death in a probable or confirmed COVID-19 case, unless there is a clear alternative cause of death that cannot be related to COVID19 (e.g. trauma)."
But I actually do not wish to restrict my question to COVID-19. Instead, I am trying to understand in general how we calculate mortality rates for different diseases, as these numbers inform policy and how funds are allocated.
Especially for complex metabolic conditions, like cardiometabolic ones, how do we decide if someone with type 2 diabetes, and vascular damage potentially due to hyperglycaemia, that had a stroke, will be assigned to the diabetes deaths toll or to the cardiovascular deaths toll?
How does e.g. WHO come up with:
9.5 million deaths from heart attack per annum
6 million deaths from stroke per annum
2 million deaths from diabetes per annum
Is there a guideline given to doctors regarding a decision-roadmap to assign the cause of death?

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (6)
Project
Describe the associations between lifestyle and biological age
Archived project
The objective of the Feel4Diabetes team was to develop, implement and evaluate a community-based intervention aiming to promote behavioral changes and create a more supportive social and physical environment to prevent type 2 diabetes among families from low and middle income countries and from vulnerable populations in high income countries in Europe.
Archived project
To synthesise the evidence on the quality of nutrition assessments in dietetics research.