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George Lutterodt

George Lutterodt

PhD. MSc.

About

17
Publications
1,954
Reads
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189
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2007 - January 2012
UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
We mapped the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) virus assemblage in groundwater below sub-Saharan urban poor settlements in Arusha (Tanzania), Dodowa (Ghana), and Kampala (Uganda). Our results indicated that ∼80% of dsDNA virus sequences matched the order of Caudovirales, i.e., indigenous bacteriophages; 1.8% of the dsDNA virus sequences matched those of...
Article
Full-text available
This work presents an assessment of the chemico-physical and microbial quality of water samples from hand-dug wells in the shallow aquifer of three communities neighbouring the University of Cape Coast, Ghana. Sanitary risk inspection was undertaken at each well location and the physical parameters including electrical conductivity, pH, Dissolved O...
Article
Full-text available
Study Region: Accra Plains. Study Focus: We conducted a field geology mapping, a well inventory exercise, used ERT, drilled boreholes at 8 locations (15–60 m depth), took drill core samples which we subjected to dilute acid leaching experiments, installed piezometers and equipped them with pressure transducers, analyzed tidal signals in high freque...
Preprint
Full-text available
The unsustainability of the services related to water, sanitation and hygiene in informal settlements in Sub-Saharan Africa services is deeply embedded in current societal and governance structures, cultures and practices; it is context-dependent and involves numerous actors with different interests. The field of sustainability transitions research...
Article
Full-text available
To assess the suitability of water sources for drinking purposes, samples were taken from groundwater sources (boreholes and hand-dug wells) used for drinking water in the Dodowa area of Ghana. The samples were analyzed for the presence of fecal indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli) and viruses (Adenovirus and Rotavirus), using membrane filtration...
Article
We applied graphical methods and multivariate statistics to understand impacts of an unsewered slum catchment on nutrients and hydrochemistry of groundwater in Kampala, Uganda. Data were collected from 56 springs (groundwater), 22 surface water sites and 13 rain samples. Groundwater was acidic and dominated by Na, Cl and NO3. These ions were strong...
Article
We hypothesized that the transport of Escherichia coli strains harvested from springs could be characterized by a similar set of cell characteristics and transport parameters. The hypothesis was tested by sampling springs throughout the Lubigi catchment in Kampala, Uganda. Chemo-physical parameters in addition to total coliform concentrations were...
Article
We present a new methodology to scale up bacteria transport experiments carried out in the laboratory to practical field situations. The key component of the methodology is to characterize bacteria transport not by a constant sticking efficiency, but by a range of sticking efficiency values determined from laboratory column experiments. In this stu...
Article
The deviation of bacteria transport and deposition patterns on grains in porous media from theory has resulted in the inability to accurately predict transport distances in aquifers, with consequences of polluting drinking water sources (springs, boreholes and wells). Due to the importance of Escherichia coli (E. coli) as an indicator of faecal con...
Article
To help improve the prediction of bacteria travel distances in aquifers laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the distant dependent sticking efficiencies of two low attaching Escherichia coli strains (UCFL-94 and UCFL-131). The experimental set up consisted of a 25 m long helical column with a diameter of 3.2 cm packed with 99.1% pure-qu...
Article
In health impact assessments, the sticking efficiency of a bacteria or virus population largely determines the transported distance of that biocolloid population, and hence, the potential health impact. However, at the same time, one of the most difficult parameters to estimate is the lower value of the sticking efficiency that should be used in ca...
Article
Although Escherichia coli is an indicator of fecal contamination in aquifers, limited research has been devoted to understanding the biological processes involved in the initial attachment of E. coli transported in abiotic porous media. The roles of the various surface structures of E. coli, like lipopolysaccharides (LPS), autotransporter proteins,...
Article
Bacteria properties play an important role in the transport of bacteria in groundwater, but their role, especially for longer transport distances (>0.5 m) has not been studied. Thereto, we studied the effects of cell surface hydrophobicity, outer surface potential (OSP), cell sphericity, motility, and Ag43 protein expression on the outer cell surfa...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Unlocking the Potential of Groundwater for the Poor (UPGro), is a seven-year international research programme (2013-2020) which is jointly funded by UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). Over 130 of the world’s best researchers from 43 organisations across Africa and Europe are focused on improving the evidence base around groundwater availability and management in Sub-Saharan Africa. The goal is to ensure that the hidden wealth of Africa’s aquifers benefit all citizens and the poorest in particular. UPGro projects are interdisciplinary, linking the social and natural sciences to address this challenge. [This project page is maintained by Sean Furey (Skat Foundation/UPGro Knowledge Broker Team), however, can collaborators please take care when making changes and please only add references and material that is directly relevant. For example, someone has added this Project to a Lab that has nothing to do with UPGro! Thank you]