Georg D. Granic

Georg D. Granic
Erasmus University Rotterdam | EUR · Department of Applied Economics

PhD

About

23
Publications
5,873
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
140
Citations
Introduction
My research interests lie in the intersection of Economics, Political Science, and Psychology. I am currently researching on incentives in surveys, choices changing preferences, and just-in-time adaptive nudging.
Additional affiliations
September 2020 - present
Erasmus University Rotterdam
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
September 2019 - August 2020
University of Antwerp
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2015 - August 2019
Erasmus University Rotterdam
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
October 2008 - July 2013
Universität Konstanz
Field of study
  • Economics
October 2003 - September 2008
Universität Konstanz
Field of study
  • Economics

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Widespread evidence from psychology and neuroscience documents that previous choices unconditionally increase the later desirability of chosen objects, even if those choices were uninformative. This is problematic for economists who use choice data to estimate latent preferences, demand functions, and social welfare. The evidence on this mere choic...
Article
Full-text available
Voters often express support for a candidate whose policy platforms differ from their ideal policy preferences. We argue that under these circumstance acts of expressing support can causally change voters’ policy preferences. We conceptualize our arguments in a theoretical model of policy preference changes rooted in cognitive dissonance theory. A...
Article
We study the determinants of firms’ LGBTQ+ policies and their relation to general CSR policies. Common factors explain LGBTQ+ policies related to firms’ primary stakeholders and those aimed at public LGBTQ+ efforts: younger firms, those with more financial resources, more educated workforces, catering to retail customers, and located in liberal are...
Article
Full-text available
We examine ballot order effects in the proxy voting process. Our results show that investors and proxy advisors, confronted with repeated decision making across multiple proxy votes, are subject to choice fatigue that affects their voting patterns when electing (independent) corporate directors. Down-the-ballot directors receive considerably less s...
Article
Full-text available
Surveys typically use hypothetical questions to measure subjective and unverifiable concepts like happiness and quality of life. We test whether this is problematic using a large survey experiment on health and subjective well-being. We use Prelec’s Bayesian truth serum to incentivize the experiment and defaults to introduce biases in responses. Wi...
Article
Full-text available
We develop and validate a novel experimental design that builds a bridge between experimental research on the theory of spatial voting and the literature on measuring policy positions from text. Our design utilizes established text-scaling techniques and their corresponding coding schemes to communicate candidates’ numerical policy positions via ve...
Preprint
Full-text available
We develop and validate a novel experimental design that builds a bridge between experimental research on the theory of spatial voting and the literature on measuring policy positions from text. Our design utilizes established text-scaling techniques and their corresponding coding schemes to communicate candidates' numerical policy positions via ve...
Data
This ZIP-file contains all data files and the code-book for the article "Where Power Resides in Committees", authored by Georg D. Granic and Alexander K. Wagner.
Article
Full-text available
We demonstrate that lottery markets can exhibit the "hot-hand" phenomenon, in which past winning numbers tend to receive a greater share of the bets in future draws, even though past and future events are independent. This finding is surprising, as works by Clotfelter and Cook (1993) and Terrell (1994) have previously documented the presence of an...
Data
Data sets shared as described in the main text of the paper. Includes code-book for variables.
Preprint
Full-text available
We demonstrate that lottery markets can exhibit the "hot-hand" phenomenon, in which past winning numbers tend to receive a greater share of the bets in future draws, even though past and future events are independent. This finding is surprising, as works by Clotfelter and Cook (1993) and Terrell (1994) have previously documented the presence of an...
Preprint
Full-text available
Do choices feed back into and alter preferences? Widespread evidence arising in psychology and neuroscience shows that preferences change in response to own choices, a phenomenon typically explained through cognitive dissonance. The evidence , however, presents serious shortcomings casting doubts on its relevance for economics. We present two exper...
Preprint
Full-text available
The power to control decisions is rarely distributed equally in committees. In a small voting committee, in which members have conflicting interests, we study how the decision right to break ties (formal power) translates into effective control over outcomes (real power). Two controlled experiments show that the level of real power held by the chai...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports on the results of a series of experimental laboratory elections. The novelty of the design allows me to study both coordination failures and coordination efficiency in a repeated-game, divided majority setting. I assess and compare the performance of three voting mechanisms, Approval Voting, Borda Count, and Plurality Voting unde...
Article
Full-text available
This paper sheds new light on the preference reversal phenomenon by analyzing decision times in the choice task. In a first experiment, we replicated the standard reversal pattern and found that choices associated with reversals take significantly longer than non-reversals, and non-reversal choices take longer whenever long-shot lotteries are selec...
Research
Full-text available
Supplementary Online Materials for the article ' Political Space Representations with Approval Data'
Article
Full-text available
Data from political elections provide a snapshot of the political landscape of a country or region. This snapshot is filtered, and maybe also distorted, through the lens of the voting method in place. The standard Plurality Voting method, by virtue of asking every voter to report only the maximum of his or her preferences, might provide too little...
Article
Full-text available
We study a class of two-player normal-form games with cyclical payoff structures. A game is called circulant if both players' payoff matrices fulfill a rotational symmetry condition. The class of circulant games contains well-known examples such as Matching Pennies, Rock-Paper-Scissors, as well as subclasses of coordination and common interest game...
Article
Full-text available
We present a new experimental paradigm where choice-induced preference change is measured for alternatives which are never compared directly, but rather confronted with other alternatives in a way which keeps choices predictable without exogenously manipulating them. This implicit-choice design improves on the free-choice paradigm, avoiding the rec...
Article
We report on two field experiments on Approval Voting conducted during actual state and federal elections in Germany. Voters provided approval ballots both for named district candidates and for state parties. The data reveal significant discrepancies in the outcomes under the official method and Approval Voting. Further, our analysis suggests that...
Chapter
The 2008 state elections in the German state of Hesse were expected to be extremely close. However, nobody expected that forming a new governmentwould reveal itself to be impossible and, after long months of unsuccessful attempts, new elections would have to be called for almost exactly 1 year later.

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I would like to calculate the optimal sample size (based on power calculations) for the probit model and a binary covariate.I have run a pilot study for a randomized control trial. I am interested in how my binary treatment variable impacts my binary dependent variable. Given the data from the pilot, how can I calculate the optimal sample size for a probit model?
Thanks for your help.

Network

Cited By

Projects