Geoffrey Murray Kay

Geoffrey Murray Kay
Australian National University | ANU · Fenner School of Environment & Society

http://geoffkay.weebly.com/

About

32
Publications
9,479
Reads
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1,008
Citations
Citations since 2016
15 Research Items
749 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
Introduction
Interdisciplinary scientist interested in the conservation values of agricultural landscapes.
Additional affiliations
January 2013 - December 2015
Australian National University
Position
  • Demonstrator
Description
  • Demonstrator for final (3rd) year undergraduate course on Biodiversity Conservation
January 2009 - June 2013
Australian National University
Position
  • Project Manager
Description
  • Environmental Stewardship Programme Project Manager - manage all aspects of a large-scale biodiversity monitoring program spanning south-eastern Australia.
January 2007 - December 2008
Australian National University
Position
  • Demonstrator
Description
  • Demonstrator for a final (3rd) year undergraduate course on Evolutionary Biology
Education
June 2013 - June 2016
Australian National University
Field of study
  • Landscape Ecology
July 2007 - June 2008
Australian National University
Field of study
  • Evolutionary Biology
January 2001 - June 2007
Australian National University
Field of study
  • Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Tackling the global threat of habitat fragmentation on biodiversity requires knowledge of how species move within agricultural landscapes. However, the specific mechanisms influencing dispersal within such landscapes remain poorly understood. The objective of our study was to assess how matrix type (improved pasture, native pasture or crop) and str...
Article
Full-text available
Livestock grazing is the most widespread land use on Earth and can have negative effects on biodiversity. Yet, many of the mechanisms by which grazing leads to changes in biodiversity remain unresolved. One reason is that conventional grazing studies often target broad treatments rather than specific parameters of grazing (e.g., intensity, duration...
Article
Abstract Land-stewardship programmes are a major focus of investment by governments for conserving biodiversity in agricultural landscapes. These programmes are generally large-scale (e.g. >1000 km) spanning multiple biogeographic regions but developed using spatially limited (e.g. landscape-scale; <100 km) ecological data interpolated across broad...
Article
Full-text available
We report on the design and implementation of ecological monitoring for an Australian biodiversity conservation incentive scheme - the Environmental Stewardship Program. The Program uses competitive auctions to contract individual land managers for up to 15 years to conserve matters of National Environmental Significance (with an initial priority o...
Article
Agricultural landscapes comprise much of the earth's terrestrial surface. However, knowledge about how animals use and move through these landscapes is limited, especially for small and cryptic taxa, such as reptiles and amphibians. We aimed to understand the influence of land use on reptile and frog movement in a fine-grained grazing landscape. We...
Article
Full-text available
Agricultural transformation represents one of the greatest threats to biodiversity, causing degradation and loss of habitat, leading to changes in the richness and composition of communities. These changes in richness and composition may, in turn, lead to altered species co-occurrence, but our knowledge of this remains limited. We used a novel co-o...
Article
Full-text available
Restoration scientists and practitioners have recently begun to include economic and social aspects in the design and the investment decisions for restoration projects. With few exceptions, ecological restoration studies that include economics focus solely on evaluating costs of restoration projects. However, economic principles, tools and instrume...
Article
Full-text available
Livestock grazing is the most widespread land-use on Earth, and can have negative effects on biodiversity. Yet, many of the mechanisms by which grazing leads to changes in biodiversity remain unresolved. One reason is that conventional grazing studies often target broad treatments rather than specific parameters of grazing (e.g. intensity, duration...
Article
Full-text available
Our view of the Antarctic Polar Front (APF) as a circumpolar biogeographic barrier is changing (Chown et al. 2015). Th e APF marks the convergent boundary between cold Antarctic water and warmer sub-Antarctic water, and has long been considered to prevent north-south dispersal in the Southern Ocean (reviewed by Clarke et al. 2005, Fraser et al. 201...
Article
Grazing by livestock is a major ecological disturbance, with potential effects on vegetation, soil, and insect fauna. Ants are a diverse and functionally important insect group with many associations with the ground layer, yet recent global syntheses question the importance of grazing effects on ant communities relative to vegetation or soil. We ex...
Poster
Full-text available
Iftekhar, M. S., Polyakov, M., Ansel, D., Gibson, F., Kay, G., 2016. Challenges in successful implementation of ecological restoration projects: How can economics help? Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society (AARES) National Conference, 2-5 February, 2016, Canberra, Australia
Article
Full-text available
Approaches to prioritize conservation actions are gaining popularity. However, limited empirical evidence exists on which species might benefit most from threat mitigation and on what combination of threats, if mitigated simultaneously, would result in the best outcomes for biodiversity. We devised a way to prioritize threat mitigation at a regiona...
Article
In the wet-dry tropics, animal species face the major challenges of acquiring food, water or shelter during an extended dry season. Although large and conspicuous animals such as ungulates and waterfowl migrate to wetter areas during this time, little is known of how smaller and more cryptic animal species with less mobility meet these challenges....
Article
Ecological theory predicts that species with narrow niche requirements (habitat specialists) are more vulnerable to anthropocentric disturbances than those with broad niche requirements (habitat generalists). Hence, understanding a species ecological niche and guild membership would serve as a valuable management tool for providing a priori assessm...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal knowledge is essential for conservation management, and demand is growing. But are we accumulating dispersal knowledge at a pace that can meet the demand? To answer this question we tested for changes in dispersal data collection and use over time. Our systematic review of 655 conservation-related publications compared five topics: climat...
Article
Full-text available
A large-scale biodiversity monitoring program examining the response of herpetofauna to the Australian Government's Environmental Stewardship Program is taking place in south-eastern Australia within the critically endangered Box Gum Grassy Woodland vegetation community. Field surveys involve counting reptiles in areas under Environmental Stewardsh...
Data
Explanation of the direct monitoring costs. (DOCX)
Data
Variables measured and desired Program outcomes. (DOC)
Data
Grazing management experiment details. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Ctenotus is the largest and most diverse genus of skinks in Australia with at least 97 described species. We generated large mitochondrial and nuclear DNA data sets for 70 individuals representing all available species in the C. labillardieri species-group to produce the first comprehensive phylogeny for this clade. The widespread C. labillardieri...
Book
This book brings together extensive scientific learning on what makes a good farm for biodiversity. Based on thirteen years of intensive research, it breaks the discussion into chapters on key environmental and vegetation assets and then discusses how to make these assets better for biodiversity. The work encompasses information on vertebrates and...
Article
Full-text available
This review synthesises research on the Pink-tailed Worm-lizard Aprasia parapukhella - a threatened species with life-history traits and habitat and dietary preferences that make it particularly vulnerable to decline. Further information on the ecology of A. parapukhella is required in order to develop effective approaches to conservation and manag...
Article
Knowing how species respond to fire regimes is essential for ecologically sustainable management. This axiom raises two important questions: (1) what knowledge is the most important to develop and (2) to what extent can current research methods deliver that knowledge? We identify three areas of required knowledge: (i) a mechanistic understanding of...
Article
Agencies charged with nature conservation and protecting built-assets from fire face a policy dilemma because management that protects assets can have adverse impacts on biodiversity. Although conservation is often a policy goal, protecting built-assets usually takes precedence in fire management implementation. To make decisions that can better ac...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Traditionally, ecological restoration activities and projects have been targeted, prioritised and planned using ecological considerations. Only recently ecologists have begun to include economic and social considerations into the design of restoration projects, mostly by including the costs. This project intends to summarise the lessons from economics that could be used to improve effectiveness of ecological restoration programs.