Geoffrey P Jones

Geoffrey P Jones
James Cook University

PhD

About

388
Publications
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29,222
Citations

Publications

Publications (388)
Article
Full-text available
Body size influences many life history traits, with small‐bodied animals tending to have short life spans, high mortality, and greater reproductive effort early in life. In this study, we investigated the life history traits and reproductive strategies of three small‐bodied coral reef gobies of the genus Trimma: Trimma benjamini, T. capostriatum an...
Article
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Sponges (Porifera) are a key component of many coral reef ecosystems. In some biogeographic regions, they are considered the dominant benthic fauna and they have the capacity to fulfil many similar roles to reef-building scleractinians. Certainly, sponges predominate at depth, below the critical thresholds of most coral species. The biological and...
Preprint
Full-text available
Social hierarchies within groups define the distribution of resources and provide benefits that support the collective group or favor dominant members. The progression of individuals through social hierarchies is a valuable characteristic for quantifying population dynamics. On coral reefs, a number of small site-attached fish maintain size-based h...
Article
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Networks of no-take marine protected areas (MPAs), where all extractive activities are prohibited, are the most effective tool to directly protect marine ecosystems from destructive and unsustainable human activities. No-take MPAs and MPA networks have been globally implemented in coastal seas, and their success has been significantly enhanced wher...
Article
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Coral reefs exhibit consistent patterns in biodiversity across multiple spatial scales, from local to global clines in species richness, abundance and community structure. Knowledge of fundamental processes driving these patterns is largely derived from studies of shallow, emergent and nearshore reefs. Although research efforts are expanding to dee...
Article
Fisheries management relies on various catch and effort controls to preserve spawning stock biomass and maximize sustainable yields while limiting fishery impacts on marine ecosystems. These include species-specific minimum or maximum size limits to protect either small non-reproductive subadults, a portion of reproductively mature adults, or large...
Article
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Despite increasing threats to Tonga's coral reefs from stressors that are both local (e.g. over-fishing and pollution) and global (e.g. climate change), there is yet to be a systematic assessment of the status of the country's coral reef ecosystem and reef fish fishery stocks. Here, we provide a national ecological assessment of Tonga's coral reefs...
Article
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Individuals that forgo their own reproduction in animal societies represent an evolutionary paradox because it is not immediately apparent how natural selection can preserve the genes that underlie non-breeding strategies. Cooperative breeding theory provides a solution to the paradox: non-breeders benefit by helping relatives and/or inheriting bre...
Article
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Hybridization and introgression are evolutionarily significant phenomena breaking down species boundaries. "Hybrid zones" (regions of species overlap and hybridization) enable quantification of hybridization frequency and examination of mechanisms driving and maintaining gene flow. The hybrid anemonefish Amphiprion leucokranos is found where parent...
Article
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Habitat area and fragmentation are recognised as important factors that influence population size, community structure and extinction risk. Abundance and species richness universally increase with habitat area. However, the effects of different aspects of habitat fragmentation, including variation in patch size, number and isolation are often not d...
Article
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Sexual dimorphism is common in the animal kingdom and is often linked to mate choice or competition for mates in polygynous mating systems. However, sexual dimorphism is less common in species that form heterosexual pairs and has not been recorded in pair-forming coral-reef fish. Here we demonstrate a pronounced morphological difference between mal...
Article
Well-managed and enforced no-take marine reserves generate important larval subsidies to neighboring habitats and thereby contribute to the long-term sustainability of fisheries. However, larval dispersal patterns are variable, which leads to temporal fluctuations in the contribution of a single reserve to the replenishment of local populations. Id...
Article
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Combining no‐take marine reserves with exclusive access by communities to unreserved waters could provide the required incentives for community management to achieve positive impacts. However, few protected areas have been critically evaluated for their impact, which involves applying counterfactual thinking to predict conditions within protected a...
Article
Plasticity, the capacity of individuals to respond to changing environments by modifying traits, may be critically important for population persistence by allowing for adaptive responses on shorter timescales than genetic change. Here, we use the clown anemonefish (Amphiprion percula), whose access to resources is constrained by their anemones, to...
Article
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A central issue in evolutionary ecology is how patterns of dispersal influence patterns of relatedness in populations. In terrestrial organisms, limited dispersal of offspring leads to groups of related individuals. By contrast, for most marine organisms, larval dispersal in open waters is thought to minimize kin associations within populations. Ho...
Article
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The expansion of coastal marine protected areas can suffer from two key drawbacks: (a) the difficulty of incentivizing local communities to manage areas for conservation when their livelihoods also depend on resource use; and (b) that many protected areas get situated residually, or in locations with limited value for either biodiversity conservati...
Article
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The structure and function of coral reef ecosystems is increasingly compromised by multiple stressors, even in the most remote locations. Severe, acute disturbances such as volcanic eruptions represent extreme events that can annihilate entire reef ecosystems, but also provide unique opportunities to examine ecosystem resilience and recovery. Here,...
Article
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Coral reef fishes are known to respond to chemical cues in the selection of appropriate microhabitats at settlement. Coral- and non-coral-associated species are likely to respond to different stimuli and the cues may change as larvae settle and become familiar with the reef environment. Here, the chemosensory responses of both late-stage larvae and...
Technical Report
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This report provides a detailed synthesis of the current ecological status of Tonga’s Special Management Area (SMA) program and the nations coral reef ecosystem. From 2016 to 2019, a total of 383 sites were surveyed across Tonga’s coral reef ecosystem to determine the health of the countries marine environment and the impacts of their approach to...
Article
The hybrid anemonefish, Amphiprion leucokranos, is known to be the product of ongoing, introgressive hybridization between parent taxa Amphiprion sandaracinos and Amphiprion chrysopterus. Hybridization is an important evolutionary phenomenon contributing to biodiversity within marine systems, where hybrid zones provide ideal systems in which to stu...
Article
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The relative contributions of environmental, maternal and additive genetic factors to the Lifetime reproductive success (LRS) determine whether species can adapt to rapid environmental change. Yet to date, studies quantifying LRS across multiple generations in marine species in the wild are non‐existent. Here we used 10‐year pedigrees resolved for...
Article
Environmental conditions and anthropogenic impacts are key influences on ecological processes and associated ecosystem services. Effective management of Tonga’s marine ecosystems therefore depends on accurate and up-to-date knowledge of environmental and anthropogenic variables. Although many types of environmental and anthropogenic data are now av...
Article
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Habitat characteristics play an important role in determining the structure of fish communities. The decline in fish diversity and abundance with the decline in coral diversity and cover may be explained by habitat specialisation and partitioning among reef fishes and/or preferences for particular corals that are susceptible to disturbance. These p...
Article
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Coral bleaching causes coral mortality that has knock-on effects on reef ecosystems, including reductions of some fish species. However, the extent of coral bleaching varies consider- ably among habitats. For example, deeper areas of reefs typically bleach less than areas in the shallows. However, rates of coral mortality at depth and the knock-on...
Article
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Spatial refuges in peripheral habitats will become increasingly important for species persistence as climate change and other disturbances progressively impact habitat quality and assemblage compositions. However, the capacity for persistence will be determined in part by species‐specific abilities to absorb costs related to altered or decreased qu...
Article
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Larval dispersal is a critically important yet enigmatic process in marine ecology, evolution, and conservation. Determining the distance and direction that tiny larvae travel in the open ocean continues to be a challenge. Our current understanding of larval dispersal patterns at management-relevant scales is principally and separately informed by...
Article
The world's coral reefs are rapidly transforming, with decreasing coral cover and new species configurations. These new Anthropocene reefs pose a challenge for conservation; we can no longer rely on established management plans and actions designed to maintain the status quo when coral reef habitats, and the challenges they faced, were very differe...
Article
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Many vertebrates form monogamous pairs to mate and care for their offspring. However, genetic tools have increasingly shown that many offspring arise from matings outside of the monogamous pair bond. Social monogamy is relatively common in coral reef fishes, but there have been relatively few studies that have confirmed monogamy or extra‐pair repro...
Article
Marine reserve networks are increasingly implemented to conserve biodiversity and enhance the persistence and resilience of exploited species and ecosystems. However, the efficacy of marine reserve networks in frequently disturbed systems, such as coral reefs, has rarely been evaluated. Here we analyze a well-mixed larval pool model and a spatially...
Article
Artificial reefs (ARs) have been advocated and implemented as management tools for recreational fisheries, species conservation and habitat replacement. For ARs to function as substitute habitat for degraded natural reefs, they should perform as close as possible to local natural reefs, however this is seldom investigated. Here we evaluated the per...
Article
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Investigating the niche overlap of ecologically similar species can reveal the mechanisms that drive spatial partitioning in high-diversity systems. Understanding how food resources are used and whether the diets of neighboring species are different are particularly important when considering the coexistence and functional role of species. Territor...
Article
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It is being increasingly recognized that small coral reef fishes are highly specialised on branching coral substrata and are threatened by reef degradation. In the past, it has been assumed that medium-sized mobile coral reef fishes may be less at risk. This assumes medium-sized mobile fishes are not as equally associated with and susceptible to th...
Article
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In social groups, high reproductive skew is predicted to arise when the reproductive output of a group is limited, and dominant individuals can suppress subordinate reproductive efforts. Reproductive suppression is often assumed to occur via overt aggression or the threat of eviction. It is unclear, however, whether the threat of eviction alone is...
Article
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Escalating climate-related disturbances and asymmetric habitat losses will increasingly result in species living in more marginal habitats. Marginal habitats may represent important refuges if individuals can acquire adequate resources to survive and reproduce. However, resources at range margins are often distributed more sparsely; therefore, incr...
Article
Escalating climate-related disturbances and asymmetric habitat losses will increasingly result in species living in more marginal habitats. Marginal habitats may represent important refuges if individuals can acquire adequate resources to survive and reproduce. However, resources at range margins are often distributed more sparsely; therefore, incr...
Article
Full-text available
The size and structure of social groups of animals can be governed by a range of ecological factors and behavioral interactions. In small, highly site-attached coral reef fishes, group size is often constrained by the size of the habitat patch they are restricted to. However, group size may also be influenced by changes in abundance along important...
Preprint
Full-text available
During the planning phase the efficacy of different strategies to manage marine resources should ultimately be assessed by their potential impact, or ability to make a difference to ecological and social outcomes. While community‐based and systematic approaches to establishing marine protected areas have their strengths and weaknesses, comparisons...
Article
Full-text available
The During the planning phase the efficacy of different strategies to manage marine resources should ultimately be assessed by their potential impact, or ability to make a difference to ecological and social outcomes. While community‐based and systematic approaches to establishing marine protected areas have their strengths and weaknesses, comparis...
Article
Full-text available
Competitive interactions and resource partitioning facilitate species coexistence in complex ecosystems. However, while pairwise interactions between ecologically similar species have been well studied, multi‐species competitive networks have received less attention. When interference competition between two species results in partitioning of resou...
Data
Infographic for: Direct and indirect effects of interspecific competition in a highly partitioned guild of reef fishes Jacob G. Eurich, Mark I. McCormick, and Geoffrey P. Jones Full text at https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.2389
Article
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While there is increasing evidence for habitat specialization in coral reef fishes, the extent to which different corals support different fish communities is not well understood. Here we quantitatively assess the relative importance of different coral species in structuring fish communities and evaluate whether sampling scale and coral colony size...
Article
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Increasing disturbances on coral reefs threaten fish species with close microhabitat associations in shallow waters, but deep reefs may provide refuge habitats. Assessing this potential requires a comprehensive understanding of how versatility in microhabitat use, preference, and selectivity interact with changes in habitat composition along depth...
Article
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Roving herbivorous fishes play an important role in coral reef communities by removing turf-algae, which can facilitate the settlement of coral larvae. Territorial damselfishes can influence the foraging patterns of roving herbivores by excluding them from their territories, altering the benthic assemblage. However, the impacts depend on the intens...
Article
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Settlement preferences play a critical role in the successful transition from pelagic larvae to benthic juveniles for many coral reef organisms. Reef fish larvae are capable of recognizing and behaviorally responding to a variety of sensory cues when assessing settlement site locations. The presence of resident conspecifics for site attached coral...
Article
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Tropical reefs have experienced an unprecedented loss of live coral in the past few decades and the biodiversity of coral-dependent species is under threat. Many reef fish species decline in abundance as coral cover is lost, yet the mechanisms responsible for these losses are largely unknown. A commonly hypothesised cause of fish decline is the los...
Article
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Colonial animals often form stable pair bonds, returning to the same site to breed with the same partner every year. Familiarity with both partner and breeding site has the potential to enhance an individual’s reproductive success. However, it is often unknown whether the mating system arises because of site fidelity, mate fidelity or both. Here, o...
Article
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A major goal of ecology is to explain the mechanisms that drive species distributions and ecological partitioning along gradients in the natural environment. The distributions of ecologically similar animals may depend on the degree of habitat specialization and behavioural interactions within and among species. The extent of ecological partitionin...
Article
Marine reserves exhibit increases in targeted fish species, but long-term effects on biodiversity are poorly understood. Factors other than reserve status may affect decadal changes, including environmental change. We examined the fish fauna at the iconic Poor Knights Islands over 4 decades (1974-2016) before and after implementation of a no-take m...
Article
Dispersal kernels are the standard method in biology for describing and predicting the relationship between dispersal and distance. Statistically fitted dispersal kernels allow observations of a limited number of dispersal events to be extrapolated across a wider landscape, and form the basis of a wide range of theories and methods in ecology, evol...
Article
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Marine reserves are a commonly applied conservation tool, but their size is often chosen based on considerations of socio-economic rather than ecological impact. Here, we use a simple individual-based model together with the latest empirical information on home ranges and densities in 66 coral reef fishes to quantify the conservation effectiveness...
Article
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Coral reefs are highly diverse ecosystems, where numerous closely related species often coexist. How new species arise and are maintained in these high geneflow environments have been long-standing conundrums. Hybridization and patterns of introgression between sympatric species provide a unique insight into the mechanisms of speciation and the mai...
Article
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The distribution of coral reef fishes is often closely linked to the availability of preferred habitats. However, even in specialized gobies associated with a single coral species, their distribution does not always match that of the coral host. The coral goby Paragobiodon xanthosoma is primarily restricted to shallow water (<20 m), while its coral...
Article
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Larval dispersal is a critical yet enigmatic process in the persistence and productivity of marine metapopulations. Empirical data on larval dispersal remain scarce, hindering the use of spatial management tools in efforts to sustain ocean biodiversity and fisheries. Here we document dispersal among subpopulations of clownfish (Amphiprion percula)...
Article
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Diet specificity is likely to be the key predictor of a predator's vulnerability to changing habitat and prey conditions. Understanding the degree to which predatory coral reef fishes adjust or maintain prey choice, in response to declines in coral cover and changes in prey availability, is critical for predicting how they may respond to reef habit...
Article
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Habitat edges commonly support discrete communities compared to adjoining habitats in response to unique boundary conditions. Coral reefs are often adjacent to other habitats, e.g. sand or seagrass meadows, but little is known about how reef-associated organisms respond to the presence of edges. Here, we examined fish communities and benthic assemb...
Article
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Increasing disturbance frequency and severity on coral reefs has caused declines in the abundance of structurally complex corals and many fish species that depend on them. However, most studies have focused on the shallowest 10 m, despite coral habitat extending to >30 m in many regions. Reefs in deeper water and offshore locations are less exposed...
Article
The degree to which offspring remain near their parents or disperse widely is critical for understanding population dynamics, evolution, and biogeography, and for designing conservation actions. In the ocean, most estimates suggesting short-distance dispersal are based on direct ecological observations of dispersing individuals, while indirect evol...
Article
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Larval dispersal by ocean currents is a critical component of systematic marine protected area (MPA) design. However, there is a lack of quantitative methods to incorporate larval dispersal in support of increasingly diverse management objectives, including local population persistence under multiple types of threats (primarily focused on larval re...