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Geoffrey Mark Jacquez

Geoffrey Mark Jacquez
BioMedware

MS, PhD

About

159
Publications
37,571
Reads
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3,931
Citations
Introduction
Geoffrey Mark Jacquez is President of BioMedware where he undertakes research in Epidemiology, Oncology and Public Health. We're working on new software with funding by NIEHS and NCI "VESTA: Visualization and Exploratory Space-Time data Analysis". Read about on our VESTA project page.
Additional affiliations
January 2009 - present
University of Michigan
January 1986 - November 1989
Stony Brook University
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (159)
Article
Full-text available
As the volume, accuracy and precision of digital geographic informationhave increased, concerns regarding individual privacy and confidentiality havecome to the forefront. Not only do these challenge a basic tenet underlying theadvancement of science by posing substantial obst acles to the sharing of data tovalidate research results, but they are ob...
Article
Full-text available
The exposome, defined as the totality of an individual's exposures over the life course, is a seminal concept in the environmental health sciences. Although inherently geographic, the exposome as yet is unfamiliar to many geographers. This article proposes a place-based synthesis, genetic geographic information science (genetic 10 GIScience), that...
Chapter
Full-text available
The representation of geographies (e.g. census units), demographics and populations as unchanging rather than dynamic is due in part to the static world-view of GIS software, which has been criticized as not fully capable of representing temporal change and better suited to ‘snapshots’ of static systems (Goodchild 2000; Hornsby and Egenhofer 2002;...
Article
Full-text available
Until recently, little attention has been paid to geocoding positional accuracy and its impacts on accessibility measures; estimates of disease rates; findings of disease clustering; spatial prediction and modeling of health outcomes; and estimates of individual exposures based on geographic proximity to pollutant and pathogen sources. It is now cl...
Preprint
Full-text available
This chapter introduces concepts central to the space-time analysis of cancer and breast cancer in space and time. By "space" we mean geographic location; by time we mean when specific events occurred. We deal with cancer at both the individual-and population-level, and are concerned with quantifying individual exposures through space and time, and...
Presentation
Full-text available
Abstract: To what extent should cancer registries be integrated with individual-level data on the human exposome and genome? This presentation will explore this question within the framework of an ongoing contract from the National Cancer Institute’s “METRIC Software to Measure Cancer Health Environments” and a research proposal (in development)—“H...
Article
Full-text available
Influenced by a special local environment, the proportion of centenarians is particularly high in some places, known as “blue zones”. Blue zones are mysterious regions that continue to attract research. This paper explores the spatial distribution of the longevity population in a typical Chinese longevity region. Longevity evaluation indexes are us...
Article
Full-text available
Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is an enigmatic disease with few known risk factors. Spatio-temporal epidemiologic analyses have the potential to reveal patterns that may give clues to new risk factors worthy of investigation. We sought to investigate clusters of NHL through space and time based on life course residential histories. We used residential...
Article
Full-text available
In case control studies disease risk not explained by the significant risk factors is the unexplained risk. Considering unexplained risk for specific populations, places and times can reveal the signature of unidentified risk factors and risk factors not fully accounted for in the case-control study. This potentially can lead to new hypotheses rega...
Article
Full-text available
Though the etiology is largely unknown, testicular cancer incidence has seen recent significant increases in northern Europe and throughout many Western regions. The most common cancer in males under age 40, age period cohort models have posited exposures in the in utero environment or in early childhood as possible causes of increased risk of test...
Chapter
Here, we focus on alternative significance tests for ecological data that often have skewed distributions, which impair the use of most parametric significance tests based on the normal distribution. Randomization tests have been proposed as an alternative to those classical significance tests where the observed data are repetitively reshuffled to...
Article
Full-text available
Projected increases in global mean temperature of 2 – 4 °F (Kirtman et al. 2013) are anticipated to be accompanied with more severe and longer periods of extreme heat, particularly in the United States (Meehl and Tebaldi 2004). Adverse health effects of heat have been extensively researched and documented (Anderson and Bell 2011, Michelozzi et al....
Article
Full-text available
Observed and expected changes in global and regional climates pose significant challenges to local decision makers tasked with identifying, preparing for, and responding to impacts on human populations. In particular, extreme heat is expected to increase in duration and intensity in Midwestern U.S. cities in this century. Because of the increased a...
Article
Full-text available
Global mean temperatures are projected to rise 2– 4°F by the mid twenty-first cen-tury (Kirtman et al. 2013) and are expected to be accompanied by more severe and longer periods of extreme heat in particular geographic locations, including regions in the United States. (Meehl and Tebaldi 2004). Extensive research on the adverse health effects of ex...
Book
Full-text available
This User Manual for SpaceStat Version 4.0 provides a comprehensive description of the software and how to use it. Check here for current pdf http://www.biomedware.com/files/SpaceStat_4.0_Documentation.pdf and here for software http://www.biomedware.com/?module=Page&sID=spacestat.
Article
Full-text available
A large proportion of breast cancer cases are thought related to environmental factors. Identification of specific geographical areas with high risk (clusters) may give clues to potential environmental risk factors. The aim of this study was to investigate whether clusters of breast cancer existed in space and time in Denmark, using 33 years of res...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Generally, according to the definition by International Programme for Chemical Safety, part of World Health Organization (WHO 2004) an exposure event is an interaction between " an agent and a target ". In the field of human and environment interaction, an exposure refers to a human being impacted by different physical and psychological elements in...
Chapter
In recent decades, digitally georeferenced data and geographic information systems (GIS) have played a growing role in human exposure assessment. Despite this, spatiotemporally varying datasets, such as daily activity spaces, residential histories, and time-varying maps of environmental contaminants, are poorly characterized in the GIS environment....
Article
Full-text available
Marin County (California, USA) has among the highest incidences of breast cancer in the U.S. A previously conducted case-control study found eight significant risk factors in participants enrolled from 1997-1999. These included being premenopausal, never using birth control pills, lower highest lifetime body mass index, having four or more mammogra...
Article
Full-text available
This report on the Vespucci Institute on health geography in 2013 emphasizes the importance of research that connects population, health, and place from a holistic perspective. We review important trends related to Health GIS and highlight directions for future research in this area that were identified at the Institute.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this position paper, we describe a vision for the future of a so-called "Spatial-Health CyberGIS Marketplace". We first situate this proposed new computing ecosystem within the set of currently-available enabling technologies and techniques. We next provide a detailed vision of the capabilities and features of an ecosystem that will benefit indi...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter explores the geocoding process in the context of health science research from both the theoretical and applied viewpoints. First, the many roles that geocoding plays in health science research are illustrated to show the breadth of scenarios where geocoding technologies have an impact. Secondly, technical details of the geocoding proce...
Data
This project runs in BioMedware's SpaceStat software. I used it when I created the book chapter in the Handbook of Applied Spatial Analysis titled "Space-Time Intelligence System Software for the Analysis of Complex Systems." The data come from the Dominik's store chain in the Chicago area. Daily sales in several categories were recorded for each...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The “Evaluation of Homomorphic Cryptography for Geospatial Studies with Human Subjects Workshop, sponsored by Biomedware and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, Inc., (NAACCR), was held on June 8-9, 2013, in Austin, TX. The purpose of the workshop was to: • Learn of the current status of the National Library of Medicine (NL...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Understanding latency – the delay between a cause and its effect – is critical when modeling dynamic geographic systems in general and in particular for human health outcomes such as cancer. This paper uses compartmental models to estimate residence times in states defining the progression of pancreatic cancer. Two models are developed. The first m...
Article
Full-text available
Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a frequent cancer and incidence rates have increased markedly during the second half of the 20(th) century; however, the few established risk factors cannot explain this rise and still little is known about the aetiology of NHL. Spatial analyses have been applied in an attempt to identify environmental risk factors, bu...
Chapter
Full-text available
Spatial autocorrelation in health events may be the signature of underlying causal factors of direct scientific and practical interest but may also be due to pedestrian or nuisance factors that obscure meaningful spatial patterns. The problem is to discern spatial patterns that inform our understanding of the health events themselves from those tha...
Article
Full-text available
In recent decades, digitally georeferenced data and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have played a growing role in human exposure assessment for environmental epidemiologic studies. Despite the increased use of GIS in exposure assessment research, spatio-temporally varying datasets, such as daily activity spaces, residential histories, and time...
Article
Full-text available
Few investigations of health event clustering have evaluated residential mobility, though causative exposures for chronic diseases such as cancer often occur long before diagnosis. Recently developed Q-statistics incorporate human mobility into disease cluster investigations by quantifying space- and time-dependent nearest neighbor relationships. U...
Article
The First International Geocoding Conference took place in December at the Esri campus in Redlands, CA. Participants Daniel Goldberg from the University of Southern California and Geoffrey Jacquez of BioMedware, Inc. offer this report.
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter explores the complex, and sometimes frustrating, world of data discovery, access, delivery and use by reference to the US National Aeronautics & Space Administration’s (NASA’s) public health applications portfolio in 2011. It also provides examples of global information system applications in health.
Article
Full-text available
A number of college presidents have endorsed the Amethyst Initiative, a call to consider lowering the minimum legal drinking age (MLDA). Our objective is to forecast the effect of the Amethyst Initiative on college drinking. A system model of college drinking simulates MLDA changes through (i) a decrease in heavy episodic drinking (HED) because of...
Conference Paper
Few cancer clustering investigations have evaluated residential mobility even though exposure to environmental carcinogens may occur decades before a cancer diagnosis. Recently developed Q-statistics can be used to investigate disease clusters based on mobility histories by quantifying space- and time-dependent nearest neighbor relationships. Qik i...
Article
Full-text available
It has been proposed that type 1 diabetes (T1D) and leukemia in children may cluster in space and time due to common spatially mediated etiologies. We investigated this hypothesis and clustering of both diseases separately in Danish children aged 0-14 years, using 1,168 leukemia cases diagnosed in the period 1980-2006, 2,443 T1D cases diagnosed 199...
Article
Full-text available
Geographic boundary analysis is a relatively new approach that is just beginning to be applied in spatial and spatio-temporal epidemiology to quantify spatial variation in health outcomes, predictors and correlates; generate and test epidemiologic hypotheses; to evaluate health-environment relationships; and to guide sampling design. Geographic bou...
Chapter
Full-text available
A key component of environmental epidemiologic research is the assessment of historic exposure to environmental contaminants. The continual expansion of space-time databases, coupled with the recognized need to incorporate mobility histories in environmental epidemiology, has highlighted the deficiencies of current software to visualize and process...
Article
Full-text available
A key problem facing epidemiologists who wish to account for residential mobility in their analyses is the cost and difficulty of obtaining residential histories. Commercial residential history data of acceptable accuracy, cost, and coverage would be of great value. The present research evaluated the accuracy of residential histories from LexisNexi...
Article
Epidemiologic analyses traditionally rely on point estimates of exposure for assessing risk despite exposure error. We present a strategy that produces a range of risk estimates reflecting distributions of individual-level exposure. Quantitative estimates of exposure and its associated error are used to create for each individual a normal distribut...
Article
Full-text available
Objective Arsenic in drinking water has been linked with the risk of urinary bladder cancer, but the dose–response relationships for arsenic exposures below 100 μg/L remain equivocal. We conducted a population-based case–control study in southeastern Michigan, USA, where approximately 230,000 people were exposed to arsenic concentrations between 10...
Article
Exposure to the risk of neighbourhood infection was estimated for the H7N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) epidemic that affected Northern Italy between 1999 and 2000. The two most affected regions (Lombardy and Veneto) were analyzed and the epidemic was divided into three phases. Q statistics were used to evaluate exposure to the risk of...
Article
Full-text available
This article extends the compartmental model previously developed by Scribner et al. in the context of college drinking to a mathematical model of the consequences of lowering the legal drinking age. Using data available from 32 U.S. campuses, the analyses separate underage and legal age drinking groups into an eight-compartment model with differen...
Article
Epidemiologic analyses traditionally rely on point estimates of exposure for assessing risk. In reality, however, exposure is characterized with uncertainty that can vary across individuals. Methods which incorporate uncertainty in exposure into epidemiologic analyses will yield a greater degree of confidence in estimates of risk. In this report we...
Article
Full-text available
Although sources of positional error in geographic locations (e.g. geocoding error) used for describing and modeling spatial patterns are widely acknowledged, research on how such error impacts the statistical results has been limited. In this paper we explore techniques for quantifying the perturbability of spatial weights to different specificati...
Article
Full-text available
The misuse and abuse of alcohol among college students remain persistent problems. Using a systems approach to understand the dynamics of student drinking behavior and thus forecasting the impact of campus policy to address the problem represents a novel approach. Toward this end, the successful development of a predictive mathematical model of col...
Article
The objective of this study was to detect statistically significant racial disparities in lung cancer mortality at the U.S. congressional district level. We applied absolute disparity statistics to mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) for 1990-2001, mapped significant lung cancer mortality disparities by race and gen...
Article
Full-text available
Most disease clustering methods assume specific shapes and do not evaluate statistical power using the applicable geography, at-risk population, and covariates. Cluster Morphology Analysis (CMA) conducts power analyses of alternative techniques assuming clusters of different relative risks and shapes. Results are ranked by statistical power and fal...
Article
Racial disparities in survival from breast and prostate cancer are well established; however, the roles of societal/socioeconomic factors and innate/genetic factors in explaining the disparities remain unclear. One approach for evaluating the relative importance of societal and innate factors is to quantify how the magnitude of racial disparities c...
Article
Full-text available
Cancer registries are increasingly mapping residences of patients at time of diagnosis, however, an accepted protocol for spatial analysis of these data is lacking. We undertook a public health practice-research partnership to develop a strategy for detecting spatial clusters of early stage breast cancer using registry data. Spatial patterns of ear...
Article
This paper develops and applies new techniques for the simultaneous detection of boundaries and clusters within a probabilistic framework. The new statistic “little b” (written b ij) evaluates boundaries between adjacent areas with different values, as well as links between adjacent areas with similar values. Clusters of high values (hotspots) and...
Article
Full-text available
Exposure misclassification is a major concern in epidemiologic studies. The potential for misclassification becomes even more problematic when participants are asked to recall historical information. Yet, historical information is important in cancer studies, where latency is long and causative exposures may have occurred years or even decades prio...
Chapter
Spatial autocorrelation in health events may be the signature of underlying causal factors of direct scientific and practical interest but may also be due to pedestrian or nuisance factors that obscure meaningful spatial patterns. The problem is to discern spatial patterns that inform our understanding of the health events themselves from those tha...