Geoff Lorenz

Geoff Lorenz
University of Virginia | UVa · Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy

Doctor of Philosophy

About

14
Publications
4,338
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88
Citations

Publications

Publications (14)
Preprint
Full-text available
Directly testing important theories of congressional lawmaking has been limited by small samples, costly data requirements, strong theoretical assumptions, or stringent lobbying disclosure requirements at other levels of government. We address these issues by jointly scaling cosponsorship, roll call, and interest group position-taking data to estim...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has induced a system-wide economic downturn disrupting virtually every conceivable economic interest. Which interests do legislators publicly champion during such crises? Here, we examine mentions of particular industries across thousands of press releases issued by members of Congress during the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic...
Article
Full-text available
The transparency organization MapLight records instances of organizations taking positions for and against legislation in Congress. The dataset comprises some 130,000 such positions taken on thousands of bills between the 109th and 115th Congresses (2005–2018). The depth and breadth of these data potentially give them wide applicability for answeri...
Article
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For decades, critics of pluralism have argued that the American interest group system exhibits a significantly biased distribution of policy preferences. We evaluate this argument by measuring groups’ revealed preferences directly, developing a set of ideal point estimates, IGscores, for over 2,600 interest groups and 950 members of Congress on a c...
Preprint
Full-text available
For decades, critics of pluralism have argued that the American interest group system exhibits a significantly biased distribution of policy preferences. We evaluate this argument by measuring groups' revealed preferences directly, developing a set of ideal point estimates, IGscores, for over 2,600 interest groups and 950 members of Congress on a c...
Preprint
Students of democratic institutions often allege that revolving door lobbyists enjoy greater access on Capitol Hill, exploiting "incestuous" ties to their former employers to lobby on behalf of their clients. We argue on informational grounds that revolvers have a comparative advantage more general than that. As outsiders connected to insider netwo...
Article
Full-text available
Members of Congress seek to allocate their scarce staff resources carefully, given their multiple, sometimes competing, objectives. Using data on House members' staff allocations from 1994 to 2008, we demonstrate that legislators advance more (and more significant) legislation when they retain a more experienced legislative staff. This benefit, how...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Revolving door lobbyists sit at the intersection of two communications networks, one connected to Capitol Hill actors, the other to fellow lobbyists. A growing body of research has investigated revolvers’ success in gaining access to legislators, but we know less about whether congressional experience improves lobbyists’ position in interest group...
Thesis
This dissertation examines why Congress addresses some problems while ignoring others. Key to this process are congressional committees, which organize much of Congress's day-to-day activity but whose role has been downplayed in recent scholarship on congressional lawmaking. I examine how committees come to address particular problems with legislat...
Article
Full-text available
While not all interest groups participate in coalitions, some groups join multiple coalitions to form portfolios of coalition memberships. We test hypotheses that the composition of coalition portfolios increases the influence of interest groups over public policy when: (1) the number of coalitions in a group’s portfolio gets larger; (2) the averag...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Connect the study of lobbying to the study of lawmaking by investigating how lobbying affects the fate of individual legislative proposals.