Geoff Hollis

Geoff Hollis
University of Alberta | UAlberta · Department of Computing Science

PhD

About

23
Publications
5,670
Reads
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542
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2017 - present
University of Alberta
Position
  • Lecturer
January 2012 - September 2017
University of Alberta
Position
  • Lecturer
January 2011 - September 2013
MacEwan University
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
September 2006 - September 2010
University of Cincinnati
Field of study
  • Psychology
September 2001 - April 2005
University of Alberta
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
In recent years large datasets of lexical processing times have been released for several languages, including English, French, Spanish, and Dutch. Such datasets have enabled us to study, compare, and model the global effects of many psycholinguistic measures such as word frequency, orthographic neighborhood (ON) size, and word length. We have comp...
Article
Sound symbolism refers to associations between language sounds (i.e., phonemes) and perceptual and/or semantic features. One example is the maluma/takete effect: an association between certain phonemes (e.g., /m/, /u/) and roundness, and others (e.g., /k/, /ɪ/) and spikiness. While this association has been demonstrated in laboratory tasks with non...
Article
Full-text available
Although studies of humour are as old as the Western academic tradition, most theories are too vague to allow for modelling and prediction of humour judgments. Previous work in modelling humour judgments has succeeded by focusing on the world's worst jokes: the slight humour of single nonwords (Westbury, Shaoul, Moroschan, & Ramscar, 2016) and sing...
Article
Research that has compared the predictive validities of word frequency (WF) and contextual diversity (CD) in lexical processing tasks has generally found that CD accounts for more unique variance than does WF. After CD's variance has been accounted for, WF accounts for little or none of the remaining variance in lexical processing times. This has l...
Article
Full-text available
Best–worst scaling is a judgment format in which participants are presented with K items and must choose the best and worst items from that set, along some underlying latent dimension. Best–worst scaling has seen recent use in natural-language processing and psychology to collect lexical semantic norms. In such applications, four items have always...
Article
Full-text available
A vector-based model of discriminative learning is presented. It is demonstrated to learn association strengths identical to the Rescorla–Wagner model under certain parameter settings (Rescorla & Wagner, 1972, Classical Conditioning II: Current Research and Theory, 2, 64–99). For other parameter settings, it approximates the association strengths l...
Article
Theories of humor tend to be post hoc descriptions, suffering from insufficient operationalization and a subsequent inability to make predictions about what will be found humorous and to what extent. Here we build on the Engelthaler & Hills’ (2017) humor rating norms for 4,997 words, by analyzing the semantic, phonological, orthographic, and freque...
Article
Full-text available
Co-occurrence models have been of considerable interest to psychologists because they are built on very simple functionality. This is particularly clear in the case of prediction models, such as the continuous skip-gram model introduced in Mikolov, Chen, Corrado, and Dean (2013), because these models depend on functionality closely related to the s...
Article
Full-text available
Large-scale semantic norms have become both prevalent and influential in recent psycholinguistic research. However, little attention has been directed towards understanding the methodological best practices of such norm collection efforts. We compared the quality of semantic norms obtained through rating scales, numeric estimation, and a less commo...
Article
It is well-established that there are relationships between word meaning and certain letters or phonemes, a phenomenon known as sound symbolism. Most sound symbolism studies have relied on a small stimulus set chosen to maximize the probability of finding an effect for a particular semantic category. Attempts to assign weights to sound symbolic cue...
Article
Full-text available
Continuous bag of words (CBOW) and skip-gram are two recently developed models of lexical semantics (Mikolov, Chen, Corrado, & Dean, Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems, 26, 3111–3119, 2013). Each has been demonstrated to perform markedly better at capturing human judgments about semantic relatedness than competing models (e.g., laten...
Article
Full-text available
Best-worst scaling is a judgment format in which participants are presented with a set of items and have to choose the superior and inferior items in the set. Best-worst scaling generates a large quantity of information per judgment because each judgment allows for inferences about the rank value of all unjudged items. This property of best-worst s...
Article
Full-text available
There is a growing body of research in psychology that attempts to extrapolate human lexical judgments from computational models of semantics (e.g., Mandera, Keuleers, & Brysbaert, 2015; Recchia & Louwerse, 2015; Westbury, Keith, Briesemeister, Hofmann, & Jacobs, 2015; Bestgen & Vincze, 2012). This research can be used to help develop comprehensive...
Article
Full-text available
Notable progress has been made recently on computational models of semantics using vector representations for word meaning (Mikolov, Chen, Corrado, & Dean, 2013; Mikolov, Sutskever, Chen, Corrado, & Dean, 2013). As representations of meaning, recent models presumably hone in on plausible organizational principles for meaning. We performed an analys...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies have shown that behavioral measures are affected by manipulating the imageability of words. Though imageability is usually measured by human judgment, little is known about what factors underlie those judgments. We demonstrate that imageability judgments can be largely or entirely accounted for by two computable measures that have prev...
Article
Full-text available
The process of connected text reading has received very little attention in contemporary cognitive psychology. This lack of attention is in parts due to a research tradition that emphasizes the role of basic lexical constituents, which can be studied in isolated words or sentences. However, this lack of attention is in parts also due to the lack of...
Article
Full-text available
Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain. This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body. The argument th...
Article
The origin of order in cognition is the topic of this chapter. We begin with a discussion of how order is explained within a traditional approach of information processing. Taking the shortcomings of this account seriously, we then turn to other disciplines—those that have framed the question of order more successfully. The answers have relied on t...
Article
Full-text available
LINGUA (Language-Independent Neighbourhood Generator of the University of Alberta) is a free, platform-independent (Java) program consisting of a set of tools that have been developed for three purposes: to turn corpora into frequency dictionaries; to calculate orthographic neighbourhood and N-gram counts; and to generate plausible nonwords in an a...
Article
Full-text available
Previously, we introduced a new computational tool for nonlinear curve fitting and data set exploration: the Naturalistic University of Alberta Nonlinear Correlation Explorer (NUANCE) (Hollis & Westbury, 2006). We demonstrated that NUANCE was capable of providing useful descriptions of data for two toy problems. Since then, we have extended the fun...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, we describe the Naturalistic University of Alberta Nonlinear Correlation Explorer (NUANCE), a computer program for data exploration and analysis. NUANCE is specialized for finding nonlinear relations between any number of predictors and a dependent value to be predicted. It searches the space of possible relations between the predi...
Article
steels & belpaeme (s&b) describe the role of genetic evolution in linguistic category sharing among a population of agents. we consider their methodology and conclude that, although it is plausible that genetic evolution is sufficient for such tasks, there is a bias in the presented work for such a conclusion to be reached. we suggest ways to elimi...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
I am current reading Miller, Barnet & Grahame's (1995) review of the Rescorla-Wagner model. In it they state that "The Rescorla-Wagner model assumes that lamda during extinction is zero and that beta for extinction (beta2) is a number smaller than beta for acquisition (beta1) but larger than zero."
The difference in betas suggests that extinction happens slower than acquisition. This difference also does not seem to be necessary for extinction to happen in principle, nor can I find anything in their discussion that either explicitly or implicitly suggests that extinction is slower than acquisition. I am wondering if this is a typo, or if there are good (empirical) reasons to think that extinction is slower than acquisition. I'm not too familiar with the literature and am having difficulties finding any research that bears on the issue directly. Hoping someone might be able to 1) give me a definitive answer and/or 2) point me to relevant readings.
Question
I know that the HKB model is applicable for bimanual coordination tasks like waggling two fingers or limbs within or between persons. I am curious if there is an extension of the HKB model, or another model, that would be relevant for coordination between more than two oscillators (e.g., typing, playing piano)?