Geneviève S Metson

Geneviève S Metson
Linköping University | LiU · Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM)

PhD

About

53
Publications
15,920
Reads
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Introduction
Geneviève S Metson currently works as an Assistant Professor at the Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University. Geneviève does research in Sustainability, Urban and Agro Ecology, Waste Management and Environmental Science.
Additional affiliations
September 2011 - December 2014
McGill University
Position
  • PhD Student
August 2009 - June 2011
Arizona State University
Position
  • Master's of Science
January 2008 - May 2009
University of California, San Diego
Position
  • Bachelor's of Science

Publications

Publications (53)
Technical Report
Full-text available
Supporting low levels of animal product (meat, dairy, and eggs) consumption and food waste can significantly reduce the impacts of unsustainable phosphorus use. In addition, consuming products grown with good on-farm nutrient management practices, including phosphorus recycling can further reduce impacts. These changes can contribute to achieving m...
Technical Report
Full-text available
There are abundant opportunities to transition towards more sustainable phosphorus use. Taken collectively, these solutions unlock multiple environmental and societal benefits. Actions must be delivered cooperatively, as part of an integrated plan across sectors and scales. Indeed, coordinated action on phosphorus to support governments, existing c...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Recycling phosphorus-rich organic wastes and manures is critical for phosphorus sustainability and a transition to a more circular economy for phosphorus. Beyond agronomic benefits, the win-wins are numerous, with benefits to society, environment, economy, and business growth. However, to significantly increase phosphorus recycling, education, awar...
Article
Full-text available
Biogas production through anaerobic digestion is an integral part of the transition toward a biobased and circular economy and its expansion is foreseen in many parts of the world as well as in Europe. In Sweden, a governmental inquiry suggested biogas production to be increased from about 2 TWh today to 7 TWh by 2030. This rapid expansion would re...
Article
Full-text available
Urban agriculture has a high potential to contribute to local circular economies, for instance by using nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium in city organic waste streams as fertilizer inputs. However, inefficient use of waste-derived fertilizers could contribute to local water quality impairment related to nitrogen and phosphorus losses. Organic wa...
Article
Full-text available
Biogas production from manure is attractive to support plans towards a circular economy as it allows for renewable energy production and nutrient recycling in agriculture. Finding optimal locations for biogas plants, which minimize transport distances to and from farms, while accounting for multiple feasibility constraints, remains a challenge. We...
Article
Full-text available
Background Research and development on the recovery and reuse of nutrients found in human excreta and domestic wastewater has intensified over the past years, continuously producing new knowledge and technologies. However, research impact and knowledge transfer are limited. In particular, uptake and upscaling of new and innovative solutions in prac...
Article
Full-text available
Ensuring future food and energy security will require large changes in consumption and production patterns, including enhanced animal and human excreta recycling. Although these shifts are considered in many scenario studies, their implications on the logistical requirements for effective recycling are rarely analysed. Here we translated two existi...
Research
Full-text available
Recirculating nutrients from human excreta back on to productive agricultural land will require a redesign of markets and, infrastructure, as well as policies and regulation. A diverse set of actors across the food chain, from grocery store shoppers and farmers, to sewage treatment plants, technology developers, and regulators need to have similar...
Article
Full-text available
Cities are net consumers of food from local and global hinterlands. Urban foodshed analysis is a quantitative approach for examining links between urban consumers and rural agricultural production by mapping food flow networks or estimating the potential for local food self-sufficiency (LFS). However, at present, the lack of a coherent methodologic...
Article
Full-text available
A circular biobased economy must be able to sustainably manage multiple resources simultaneously. Nutrient (nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium) recycling and renewable energy production (biogas) can be compatible practices but require substantial transport of heavy organic waste. We combine a spatial optimization model and Life Cycle Assessment (L...
Article
Full-text available
Phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) are essential nutrients for food production but their excess use in agriculture can have major social costs, particularly related to water quality degradation. Nutrient footprint approaches estimate N and P release to the environment through food production and waste management and enable linking these emissions to p...
Article
Full-text available
Better documentation and understanding of long-term temporal dynamics of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in watersheds is necessary to support effective water quality management, in part because studies have identified time lags between terrestrial nutrient balances and water quality. We present annual time series data from 1969 to 2012 for terrest...
Article
Full-text available
Global food production and current reliance on meat-based diets requires a large share of natural resource use and causes widespread environmental pollution including phosphorus (P). Transitions to less animal-intensive diets address a suite of sustainability goals, but their impact on society’s wastewater P burden is unclear. Using the UK as our e...
Article
Full-text available
There is an urgent need for innovation in the sanitation sector because the conventional model (toilet-to-sewer-to-treatment) is too time-consuming and costly, and alternatives are lacking. We estimate the challenge ahead by developing scenarios for 60 of the fastest-growing urban conglomerates in the World. We find that the majority would need to...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
Full-text available
It is likely that half of the urban areas that will exist in 2050 have not yet been designed and built. This provides tremendous opportunities for enhancing urban sustainability, and using “nature in cities” is critical to more resilient solutions to urban challenges. Terms for “urban nature” include Green Infrastructure (GI), Green-Blue Infrastruc...
Article
Full-text available
Urban sustainability initiatives often encompass such goals as increasing local food production, closing nutrient loops through recycling organic waste, and reducing water pollution. However, there are potential tradeoffs among these desired outcomes that may constrain progress. For example, expansion of urban agriculture for food production may cr...
Article
Full-text available
Increased recycling of nutrient-rich organic waste to meet crop nutrient needs is an essential component of a more sustainable food system. However, agricultural specialization continues to pose a significant challenge to balancing crop nutrient needs and the nutrient supply from animal manure and human excreta locally. For Sweden, this study found...
Article
Full-text available
Recycling essential plant nutrients like nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) from organic waste such as human and animal excreta will be an essential part of sustainable food systems and a circular economy. However, transportation is often cited as a major barrier to increased recycling as organic waste is heavy and bulky, and distances...
Article
Full-text available
Food production hinges largely upon access to phosphorus (P) fertilizer. Most fertilizer P used in the global agricultural system comes from mining of nonrenewable phosphate rock deposits located within few countries. However, P contained in livestock manure or urban wastes represents a recyclable source of P. To inform development of P recycling t...
Article
Full-text available
The production of food can have large impacts on sustainable development in relation to various socio-ecological dimensions, like climate change, the environment, animal welfare, livestock epidemiology, and the economy. To achieve a sustainable food production system in Sweden, an integrated approach that considers all five of these dimensions, and...
Article
Understanding and mitigating the effects of phosphorus (P) overenrichment of waters globally, including the evaluation of the global Sustainability Development Goals, requires the use of global models. Such models quantitatively link land use, global population growth and climate to aquatic nutrient loading and biogeochemical cycling. Here we descr...
Article
Full-text available
Achieving food security will require closing yield gaps in many regions, including Pakistan. Although fertilizer subsidies have facilitated increased nitrogen (N) application rates, many staple crop yields have yet to reach their maximum potential. Considering that current animal manure and human excreta (bio-supply) recycling rates are low, there...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how cities can transform organic waste into a valuable resource is critical to urban sustainability. The capture and recycling of phosphorus (P), and other essential nutrients, from human excreta is particularly important as an alternative organic fertilizer source for agriculture. However, the complex set of socio-environmental facto...
Article
The global phosphorus cycle has been transformed in recent decades through increased use of mineral phosphorus fertilizer in agriculture and losses to water bodies, leading to risks of fossil phosphorus resource depletion and freshwater eutrophication. By moving phosphorus resources across world regions, international trade of agricultural products...
Article
Full-text available
Phosphorus is an essential element for food production whose main global sources are becoming scarce and expensive. Furthermore, losses of phosphorus throughout the food production chain can also cause serious aquatic pollution. Recycling urban organic waste resources high in phosphorus could simultaneously address scarcity concerns for agricultura...
Article
Humans have greatly accelerated phosphorus (P) flows from land to aquatic ecosystems, causing eutrophication, harmful algal blooms, and hypoxia. A variety of statistical and mechanistic models have been used to explore the relationship between P management on land and P losses to waterways, but our ability to predict P losses from watersheds often...
Article
Full-text available
Changes in human diets, population increases, farming practices, and globalized food chains have led to dramatic increases in the demand for phosphorus fertilizers. Long-term food security and water quality are, however, threatened by such increased phosphorus consumption, because the world’s main source, phosphate rock, is an increasingly scarce r...
Article
Phosphorus is essential to food production, but current management practices fail to ensure equitable access to farmers globally and often results in polluted waterways. There is a lack of local and global governance mechanisms to ensure phosphorus is sustainably managed. The P-FUTURES research initiative aims to address this gap by working with st...
Article
Full-text available
Phosphorus (P) is subject to global management challenges due to its importance to both food security and water quality. The European Union (EU) has promoted policies to limit fertiliser over-application and protect water quality for more than 20 years, helping to reduce European P use. Over this time period, the EU has, however, become more relian...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Cities have the capacity to play a key role in resource and pollution management through their decisions about organic waste. Often overlooked, but nevertheless essential, is the role that cities can play in increasing phosphorus (P) recycling because cities are consumers of large amounts of P-dense food and producers of vast amounts of P-...
Article
Full-text available
Cities are a key system in anthropogenic phosphorus (P) cycling because they concentrate both P demand and waste production. Urban agriculture (UA) has been proposed as a means to improve P management by recycling cities' P-rich waste back into local food production. However, we have a limited understanding of the role UA currently plays in the P c...
Article
Eshel et al. (1) quantify the land, irrigation water, and reactive nitrogen demands of feed production, and calculate a full life cycle of greenhouse gas emission estimates for each of the five major animal-based categories in the United States diet: dairy, beef, poultry, pork, and eggs. The authors find that beef contributed most to these impacts,...
Article
Research quantifying ecosystem services (ES) – collectively, the benefits that society obtains from ecosystems –is rapidly increasing. Despite the seemingly straightforward definition, a wide variety of methods are used to measure ES. This methodological variability has largely been ignored, and standard protocols to select measures that capture ES...
Chapter
This chapter analyzes case studies concerning phosphorus sustainability. It looks into theargument of the maximization of appropriate local efforts with regards to phosphorus sustainability. It demonstrates that phosphorus budgets, inputs and outputs, provide a useful indicator of long-term sustainability. It looks into the behavior of water bodies...
Article
This chapter illustrates and explains the basic principles of sustainability. It provides a sustainability framework to existing issues in phosphorous management. It summarizes human impacts on natural phosphorus cycling and the identification of phosphorus sustainability as a "wicked problem". It describes how a sustainability perspective contribu...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
McGill and Montreal rely on ecosystem services – the benefits people obtain from ecosystems. We need services to provide food, energy, clean air and water, climate regulation, places for recreation, and cultural inspiration. Despite our reliance, we are often unaware of where these services come from and their importance to our well-being. This pro...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past 50 years, there have been major changes in human diets, including a global average increase in meat consumption and total calorie intake. We quantified how changes in annual per capita national average diets affected requirements for mined P between 1961 and 2007, starting with the per capita availability of a food crop or animal prod...
Article
Full-text available
As urban environments dominate the landscape, we need to examine how limiting nutrients such as phosphorus (P) cycle in these novel ecosystems. Sustainable management of P resources is necessary to ensure global food security and to minimize freshwater pollution. We used a spatially explicit budget to quantify the pools and fluxes of P in the Great...
Article
J-Earth is a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) application used for viewing and processing satellite and airborne remote sensing data and includes NASA imagery such as ASTER, Landsat, MODIS, TIMS, as well as other geological, ecological, and social datasets. The J-Earth team is working with the National Science Foundation-funded Central Arizona-...

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Project (1)
Project
My research deals with the production and use of science for policy focusing on sustainable sewage management in growing urban areas. The questions that drive my research are: What kind of knowledge is needed, used and trusted? How does the knowledge used impact perceived solutions? How might we facilitate for decision-makers and the public to ‘unpack’ assumptions, values and preferences that are embedded in such knowledge?