Gemma Palomar

Gemma Palomar
Jagiellonian University | UJ · Institute of Environmental Sciences

PhD

About

20
Publications
5,093
Reads
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127
Citations
Citations since 2017
15 Research Items
123 Citations
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Introduction
Gemma Palomar currently works at the Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University. Gemma does research in Bioinformatics, Genetics and Evolutionary Biology. Their current project is 'Do antigen-processing genes coevolve with MHC class I genes in salamanders?'.
Additional affiliations
November 2017 - October 2020
Jagiellonian University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2011 - July 2011
University of Oviedo
Position
  • Master's Student

Publications

Publications (20)
Preprint
Full-text available
Many species are currently adapting to cities at different latitudes. Adaptation to urbanization may require eco-evolutionary changes in response to temperature and invasive species that may differ between latitudes. Here, we studied single and combined effects of increased temperatures and invasive alien predator presence on the phenotypic respons...
Article
Full-text available
Chytridiomycosis, the disease caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been unambiguously implicated in the decline of amphibian populations worldwide. However, the impact of this devastating infectious disease can be difficult to gauge without empirical data on the population-level effects of Bd. Often, assessments of...
Article
Genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) code for immune proteins that are crucial for pathogen recognition in vertebrates. MHC research in non‐model taxa has long been hampered by its genomic complexity that makes the locus‐specific genotyping challenging. The recent progress in sequencing and genotyping methodologies allows an extensiv...
Article
Full-text available
Las pomaradas de sidra de Asturias son cultivos no intensivos capaces de albergar una fauna rica y abundante, con potencial para proporcionar relevantes servicios ecosistémicos como el control biológico de plagas. En este artículo, resumimos nuestras investigaciones sobre sus aves insectívoras e identificamos acciones de gestión agroambiental para...
Article
Emerging infectious diseases are a threat to biodiversity and have taken a large toll on amphibian populations worldwide. The chytrid fungi Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis ( Bd ) and B. salamandrivorans ( Bsal ), and the iridovirus Ranavirus ( Rv ), are of concern as all have contributed to amphibian declines. In central and eastern Europe, their ge...
Article
Full-text available
Proteins encoded by Antigen Processing Genes (APGs) provide MHC class I (MHC-I) with antigenic peptides. In mammals, polymorphic multigenic MHC-I family is served by monomorphic APGs, whereas in certain non-mammalian species both MHC-I and APGs are polymorphic and coevolve within stable haplotypes. Coevolution was suggested as an ancestral gnathost...
Article
Full-text available
Proteins encoded by Antigen Processing Genes (APGs) prepare antigens for presentation by the Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC I) molecules. Coevolution between APGs and MHC I genes has been proposed as the ancestral gnathostome condition. The hypothesis predicts a single highly expressed MHC I gene and tight linkage between APGs and MH...
Article
Full-text available
The Anthropocene has witnessed catastrophic amphibian declines across the globe. A multitude of new, primarily human‐induced drivers of decline may lead to extinction, but can also push species onto novel evolutionary trajectories. If these are recognized by amphibian biologists, they can be engaged in conservation actions. Here, we summarize how p...
Article
Genomic heterogeneity of divergence between hybridizing species may reflect heterogeneity of introgression, but also processes unrelated to hybridization. Heterogeneous introgression and its repeatability can be directly tested in natural hybrid zones by examining multiple transects. Here, we studied hybrid zones between the European newts: Lissotr...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of complex traits is often shaped by adaptive divergence. However, very little is known about the number, effect size, and location of the genomic regions influencing the variation of these traits in natural populations. Based on a dense linkage map of the common frog, Rana temporaria, we have localized, for the first time in amphibia...
Article
Full-text available
Even though parasitic infections are often costly or deadly for the host, we know very little which genes influence parasite susceptibility and disease severity. Proliferative kidney disease (PKD) is an emerging and, at elevated water temperatures, potentially deadly disease of salmonid fishes that is caused by the myxozoan parasite Tetracapsuloide...
Article
Full-text available
Questions: Is rock climbing pressure, together with microtopographic conditions, disturbing cliff plant cover and composition? What are the climbing impacts on rock specialist and non-specialist species? Can a case-control approach, not previously implemented in cliff environments, offer additional value for actual and long-term ecological research...
Article
Full-text available
One of the main goals of protected areas, especially National Parks, is biodiversity conservation. Taking into account the multiple negative impacts that allochthonous animals can cause in an ecosystem, it is important to know and track the introductions in order to take efficient management measures to enhance biodiversity conservation. We study t...
Article
Full-text available
By combining 7077 SNPs and 61 microsatellites, we present the first linkage map for some of the early diverged lineages of the common frog, Rana temporaria, and the densest linkage map to date for this species. We found high homology with the published linkage maps of the Eastern and Western lineages but with differences in the order of some marker...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the important threat that emerging pathogens pose for the conservation of biodiversity as well as human health, very little is known about the adaptive potential of host species to withstand infections. We studied the quantitative genetic architecture responsible for the burden of the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in a popu...
Article
Full-text available
El criterio fundamental para considerar que una especie es alóctona en el territorio español se basa en la constatación de que la coloniza-ción no ha sido natural, sino de origen antró-pico. Según este criterio, debemos considerar como poblaciones alóctonas la mayoría de las tratadas en este volumen, con algunas excepcio-nes como Testudo graeca en...
Article
Full-text available
The subfamily Polycerinae includes four genera with around 46 species described to date. This subfamily is characterized by a limaciform body, which may have simple tentacular processes on the margin of the oral veil. Phylogenetic relationships between the genera of the subfamily Polycerinae (Polyceridae) have not yet been studied, and therefore, t...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
In recent years, rock climbing has grown tremendously in popularity, placing pressure on cliff ecosystems. Although limited, these ecosystems can support a great diversity of species. However, few studies have assessed the effects of climbing activity on the vegetation of these habitats. Furthermore, the few existing studies were conducted at local scales. For these reasons, we aim here to carry out the first comprehensive study of climbing effects on a large-scale ecosystem: the Mediterranean environment. This is one of the most fragile environments on the planet due to its varied climatic conditions, but at the same time, one of the most biodiverse. Mediterranean environmental conditions can be found in several regions around the world, including the Mediterranean basin, Southwest of Africa, California (USA), central Chile and Southwest Australia. It is therefore possible for us to study the climbing impacts on Mediterranean environments in different locations around the world. This study will allow us to evaluate if there is a common pattern of the climbing effect. Therefore, we expect that our study will unify the systematics to be used in this field, and that this will create a precedent for the management and long-term conservation of these ecosystems.
Archived project
This ongoing capture-recapture monitoring program seeks to generate robust demographic knowledge about common frog populations from a mountain range located at the southwestern edge of the species global distribution.