Gemma Fitzsimmons

Gemma Fitzsimmons
University of Southampton · Department of Psychology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

17
Publications
8,202
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
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179
Citations
Citations since 2016
10 Research Items
152 Citations
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Introduction
My research combines methodological rigour and advanced statistical techniques in order to investigate the effects of reading on the Web and understanding the impact of hyperlinks. My recent work investigates the impact of hyperlinks as a salient coloured word and the impact of navigation and clicking on reading behaviour and comprehension. My research is often interdisciplinary in nature and involves Psychology and Computer Science, focusing on aspects of attention, information processing and eye movements and how this relates to how we process information on the Web.
Additional affiliations
June 2016 - September 2016
University of Southampton
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Strategic Interdisciplinary Research Development Funding (SIRDF) - A Novel Approach to Studying Auditory Distraction in Tinnitus using Pupillometry.
October 2015 - January 2016
University of Southampton
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Strategic Interdisciplinary Research Development Funding (SIRDF) – Studying How Individuals Search Text for Information.
October 2012 - July 2016
University of Southampton
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • PSYC1010 Research Methods and Data Analysis I PSYC1011 Research Methods and Data Analysis II RESM6012 Applied Research Methods (ARM): Planning & Designing Research PSYC3044 Eye Movements and Visual Cognition
Education
October 2012 - September 2015
University of Southampton
Field of study
  • Web Science
October 2011 - September 2012
University of Southampton
Field of study
  • Web Science
September 2008 - June 2011
University of Southampton
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (17)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
It has been suggested that readers spend a great deal of time skim reading on the Web and that if readers skim read they reduce their comprehension of what they have read. There have been a number of studies exploring skim reading, but relatively little exists on the skim reading of hypertext and Webpages. In the experiment documented here, we util...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We increasingly spend a vast amount of time on the Web and much of that time is spent reading. One of the main differences between reading non-Web based text and reading on the Web is the presence of hyperlinks within the text, linking various related Web content and Web pages together. Some researchers and commentators have claimed that hyperlinks...
Article
Full-text available
Participants' eye movements were tracked when reading sentences in which target word predictability was manipulated to being unpredictable from the preceding context, predictable from the sentence preceding the one in which the target word was embedded, or predictable from the adjective directly preceding the target word. Results show that there wa...
Article
Full-text available
In an eye-tracking experiment, participants read sentences containing a monosyllabic (e.g., grain) or a disyllabic (e.g., cargo) five-letter word. Monosyllabic target words were skipped more often than disyllabic target words, indicating that syllabic structure was extracted from the parafovea early enough to influence the decision of saccade targe...
Article
Full-text available
It has previously been shown that readers spend a great deal of time skim reading on the Web and that this type of reading can affect comprehension of text. Across two experiments, we examine how hyperlinks influence perceived importance of sentences and how perceived importance in turn affects reading behaviour. In Experiment 1, participants rated...
Article
Full-text available
It has been shown that readers spend a great deal of time skim reading on the Web and that this type of reading can affect lexical processing of words. Across two experiments, we utilised eye tracking methodology to explore how hyperlinks and navigating webpages affect reading behaviour. In Experiment 1, participants read static Webpages either for...
Article
This paper aims to explain the purpose and creation of a novel methodology for creating an interactive non-linear space for exploring reading on the Web using eye tracking. Currently there is no easy way to explore how people read on the Web using an eye movement methodology. There are ways that we can make assumptions through gaze tracking and obs...
Article
Full-text available
Fitzsimmons and Drieghe (2011, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review) showed that a monosyllabic word was skipped more often than a disyllabic word during reading. This finding was interpreted as evidence that syllabic information was extracted from the parafovea early enough to influence word skipping. In the present large-scale replication of this study...
Article
Full-text available
There has been debate about whether blue hyperlinks on the Web cause disruption to reading. A series of eye tracking experiments were conducted to explore if coloured words in black text had any impact on reading behaviour outside and inside a Web environment. Experiment 1 and 2 explored the saliency of coloured words embedded in single sentences a...
Article
Full-text available
Unlike in laboratory visual search tasks-wherein participants are typically presented with a pictorial representation of the item they are asked to seek out-in real-world searches, the observer rarely has veridical knowledge of the visual features that define their target. During categorical search, observers look for any instance of a categoricall...
Article
Full-text available
In English reading, eye guidance relies heavily on the spaces between words for demarcating word boundaries. In an eye tracking experiment, we examined the impact of removing spaces on parafoveal processing. Using the gaze-contingent boundary paradigm (Rayner, 1975), a high or low frequency pre-boundary word was followed by a post-boundary preview...
Article
Full-text available
Two experiments are reported investigating oculomotor behavior and linguistic processing when reading dynamic horizontally scrolling text (compared to reading normal static text). Three factors known to modulate processing time in normal reading were investigated: Word length and word frequency were examined in Experiment 1, and target word predict...
Thesis
Full-text available
We increasingly spend a vast amount of time on the Web and much of that time is spent reading. One of the main differences between reading non-Web based text and reading on the Web is the presence of hyperlinks within the text, linking various related Web content and webpages together. Some researchers and commentators have claimed that hyperlinks...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We increasingly spend a vast amount of time on the Web and much of that time is spent reading. One of the main differences between reading non-Web based text and reading on the Web is the presence of hyperlinks within the text, linking various related Web content and Web pages together. Some researchers and commentators have claimed that hyperlinks...
Article
Full-text available
Visual search is one of the most widely studied topics in vision science, both as an independent topic of interest, and as a tool for studying attention and visual cognition. A wide literature exists that seeks to understand how people find things under varying conditions of difficulty and complexity, and in situations ranging from the mundane (e.g...
Article
Stress, worry and anxiety have long been known to influence a broad array of behavioral functions. Here, we examined how stress influences fixational stability. Fixational stability is known to be heightened in experts (e.g., snipers; Di Russo et al., 2003), but impoverished both in individuals with pathological attention deficits (e.g., ADHD; Muno...

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