Gbadamassi Gouvide O. Dossa

Gbadamassi Gouvide O. Dossa
Chinese Academy of Sciences | CAS · Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden

Ph.D. | UCAS

About

47
Publications
16,340
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Citations
Introduction
My research is related to biodiversity, carbon sequestration with focus on assessing CO2 efflux from woody debris (WD) through disturbance gradient and its relation to forest composition. I am also looking at the factors influencing WD decomposition in tropical environments. Additionally, I examine the role wood traits and phylogeny in WD decomposition. I aim to improve the parameterization of the respiration rate of WD in order to accurately incorporate it into the global models of carbon cycle
Additional affiliations
July 2016 - July 2018
Chinese Academy of Sciences
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (47)
Article
Full-text available
Soil organic matter contributes to productivity in terrestrial ecosystems and contains more carbon than is found in the atmosphere. Yet, there is little understanding of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration processes during tropical forest succession, particularly after land abandonment from agriculture practices. Here, we used vegetation and en...
Article
Full-text available
Successful use of stable isotopes (δ²H and δ¹⁸O) in ecohydrological studies relies on the accurate extraction of unfractionated water from different types of soil samples. Cryogenic vacuum distillation (CVD) is a common laboratory‐based technique used for soil water extraction; however, the reliability of this technique in reflecting soil water δ²H...
Article
Full-text available
Premise: Determining how xylem vessel diameters vary among plants and across environments gives insights into different water-use strategies among species and ultimately their distributions. Here, we tested the vessel dimorphism hypothesis that the simultaneous occurrence of many narrow and a few wide vessels gives lianas an advantage over trees i...
Article
Clonal plants can regenerate after being fragmented by natural or artificial disturbances, which may be attributed to physiological integration. Both lithophytes and epiphytes are important ecotypes of clonal plants. However, few studies have compared the responses of lithophytes and epiphytes to clonal fragmentation. Focusing on this issue could h...
Article
Full-text available
Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) has been introduced to Southeast Asia for over a century. In various regions throughout Southeast Asia, over the past two decades, natural tropical forests have rapidly been converted into rubber monoculture. To encourage the reconversion of rubber plantations back to close-to-nature rainforests, we developed a theoretic...
Article
Full-text available
Decomposition rates of litter mixtures reflect the combined effects of litter species diversity, litter quality, decomposers, their interactions with each other and with the environment. The outcomes of those interactions remain ambiguous and past studies have reported conflicting results (e.g., litter mixture richness effects). To date, how litter...
Article
Full-text available
Forests, trees, and agroforestry (FTA) are ecosystem hotspots. They exemplify the contributions of biodiversity to sustainable and resilient landscapes, green circular economy and to sustainable agriculture and food systems for healthy diets. However, most research on these topics have been performed separately and lack comparison. The Internationa...
Article
Full-text available
Lianas account for a small fraction of forest biomass, but their contribution to leaf or litter biomass and thus to food webs can be substantial. Globally liana exhibit fast life‐history traits. Thus, liana litter may decompose faster than tree litter, and could enhance the decomposition of tree litter (complementarity effect). The differences in d...
Article
More than half of the net primary production in terrestrial ecosystems returns to the soil through leaf litter fall and decomposition. In terrestrial ecosystems, litter constitutes a mixture of mainly senescent foliage from multiple species. Yet, the effect of litter mixing on litter decomposition rate remains ambiguous. Quantification of the soil...
Article
Heavy metal pollution is becoming recurrent and threatens biota biosafety in many agricultural fields. Diverse solutions explore the application of amendments to enable remediation. Sulfur represents a nonmetallic chemical element that actively affects heavy metals phytoextraction, and promotes and alternatively mitigates soil functions. In this st...
Preprint
Full-text available
In various regions in Southeast Asia, over the past decades, natural tropical forests have rapidly been converted into monoculture plantations of rubber ( Hevea brasiliensis ), a consequence of the rubber boom. With the goal of slowing the ecologically and environmentally detrimental conversion of forests to rubber plantations and to encourage the...
Article
Full-text available
Insects first began evolving hundreds of millions of years ago, and aided by gut microbes, they have been consuming hydrocarbon polymers ever since. Few man-made plastic polymers are chemically novel, so it is reasonable that insect/microbe systems can be found or developed to degrade them rapidly. However, remediation of global plastic waste probl...
Article
Full-text available
Fungi decompose woody debris, an important carbon pool in forests. Fungal community structure is expected to vary according to the wood species, habitats and extent of abiotic disturbance, which have consequences for carbon cycling in tropical forests. Here we examined theeffects of fungal diversity and composition on woody debris decomposition rat...
Article
Woody debris represents a substantial reservoir of carbon in forests. Disentangling the effects of factors affecting wood decomposition rates is therefore important. We examined the abiotic and biotic factors affecting wood decomposition across a disturbance gradient from mature forest to open land in a tropical montane site in Xishuangbanna, SW Ch...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Fungi are essential agents in decomposing woody debris (WD), an important carbon pool in forests. However, the ecology and dynamics of these fungal communities are poorly understood, especially in tropical forests. A better understanding of anthropogenic impacts, such as forest disturbances, on WD decomposition is also needed to appreci...
Article
Full-text available
The soil fungal functional group changes in response to forest disturbance and indicates a close interaction between the aboveground plant community and the belowground soil biological community. Soil saprotrophic fungi declined in relative abundance with increasing forest disturbance. At the same time, the relative abundance of facultative pathoge...
Article
Full-text available
Plants produce above-and below-ground biomass. However, our understanding of both production and decomposition of below-ground biomass is poor, largely because of the difficulties of accessing roots. Below-ground organic matter decomposition studies are scant and especially rare in the tropics. In this study, we used a litter bag experiment to quan...
Article
Roads are an increasingly important anthropogenic disturbance to tropical ecological systems. Although the ecological impacts of roads are now well recognized, there remains a lack of certainty regarding how roads in general and roads with different widths affect vital ecosystem services such as aboveground biomass (AGB) in tropics. Using a non‐des...
Preprint
Full-text available
Plants produce above-and below-ground biomass. However, our understanding of both production and decomposition of below-ground biomass is poor, largely because of the difficulties of accessing study materials. Below-ground organic matter decomposition studies are scanty and especially rare in the tropics. Here, we used a litter bag experiment to qu...
Preprint
Deforestation has a substantial impact on above ground biodiversity, but the response of below ground soil fungi remains poorly understood. In a tropical montane rainforest in southwestern China, plots were established along a forest degradation gradient ranging from mature and regenerated forests to open land to examine the impacts of forest degra...
Article
Full-text available
Enhancing knowledge on the role of evolutionary history during forest succession and its relationship with ecosystem function is particularly relevant in the context of forest landscape restoration for climate change mitigation and adaptation. We used fine resolution vegetation and environmental data (soil, elevation and slope) from two large‐scale...
Article
Woody debris (WD) represents a globally significant carbon stock and its decomposition returns nutrients to the soil while providing habitat to microbes, plants and animals. Understanding what drives WD decomposition is therefore important. WD decomposition rates differ greatly among species. However, the role of bark in the process remains poorly...
Article
Full-text available
Organic matter decomposition represents a vital ecosystem process by which nutrients are made available for plant uptake and is a major flux in the global carbon cycle. Previous studies have investigated decomposition of different plant parts, but few considered bark decomposition or its role in decomposition of wood. However, bark can comprise a l...
Article
Full-text available
Deforestation and forest degradation are driving unprecedented declines in biodiversity across the tropics, and understanding the consequences of these changes for ecosystem functioning is essential for human well-being. Forest degradation and loss alter ecosystem functioning through changes in species composition and abiotic conditions. However, t...
Article
Full-text available
Improved understanding of the carbon (C) cycle is essential to model future climates and how this may feedback to affect greenhouse gas fluxes. We summarize previous work quantifying respiration rates of organic substrates and briefly discuss how advances in technology, specifically the use of chambers linked to a non‐dispersive infrared gas analyz...
Article
Litterfall plays an important role in nutrient cycling and maintenance of soil fertility in terrestrial ecosystems. Annual and seasonal variation in litterfall have been investigated in various habitats, however, seasonality in nutrient supply is less well documented. We studied litterfall over two years and seasonal litter nutrient input over one...
Data
Full-text available
Tropical volcanoes are an important but understudied ecosystem, and the relationships between plant species diversity and compositional change and elevation may differ from mountains created by uplift, because of their younger and more homogeneous soils. We sampled vegetation over an altitudinal gradient on Mt. Rinjani, Lombok, Indonesia. We modele...
Article
Full-text available
Data available from the Dryad Digital Repository: doi:10.5061/dryad.8n6t5 Tropical volcanoes are an important but understudied ecosystem, and the relationships between plant species diversity and compositional change and elevation may differ from mountains created by uplift, because of their younger and more homogeneous soils. We sampled vegetatio...
Data
Summary of models for alpha and beta-diversity of different components of vegetation on Mount Rinjani, Indonesia. Models were arranged according to ΔAIC value. Variables included in the models were elevation, LAI, slope and their respective interactive terms. EL = elevation, SL = slope, LAI = leaf area index. (DOCX)
Data
Non- metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination of ground-cover plant assemblages on Mount Rinjani, Indonesia. The contours show different elevations and the letters represent different species (the identity of each letter is found in Table S2). (TIF)
Data
Non- metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination of understorey plant assemblages on Mount Rinjani, Indonesia. The contours show different elevations and the letters represent different species (the identity of each letter is found in Table S2). (TIF)
Data
Non- metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination of subcanopy plant assemblages on Mount Rinjani, Indonesia. The contours show different elevations and the letters represent different species (the identity of each letter is found in Table S2). (TIF)
Data
Overall species found at Rinjani's plots. G = ground stratum, U = understory stratum, S = subcanopy, and C = canopy. (DOCX)
Data
Summary of models examined for above ground biomass of vegetation on Mt Rinjani. Models are arranged according to ΔAIC value. K refers to numbers of parameters included. EL = elevation and SL = slope. We included elevation and slope in the maximal model (all stations 2200 m included). (DOCX)
Data
Non- metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination of canopy plant assemblages on Mount Rinjani, Indonesia. The contours show different elevations and the letters represent different species (the identity of each letter is found in Table S2). (TIF)

Questions

Questions (4)
Question
Is there any database or available software to convert fatty acids to microorganism groups? We are planning to extract phospholids fatty acids (PLFA) from decomposing wood samples. But we wonder how to relate or convert those PLFA to microorganism groups such as bacteria, fungi, Acenobacteria etc..
Thank
Question
Is there any package similar to scattterplot 3d for R version >= 3.1.1?
if not are you aware of any package handling  3D plotting in  R version >= 3.1.1?
Thanks
Question
Air pressure varies with altitude, but is there a literature which has investigated this? I have the attached piece of work which shows how to derive pressure knowing the altitude. Please can you provide any article which has discussed how air pressure changes temporally at a given geographical location?
Thanks
Question
I am interested on woody debris decomposition in tropical environments. Are there any techniques or approaches to control termite effect during the decomposition process? Any articles out there?

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