Gavin Bidelman

Gavin Bidelman
Indiana University Bloomington | IUB

PhD

About

193
Publications
29,344
Reads
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5,030
Citations
Citations since 2017
119 Research Items
3629 Citations
20172018201920202021202220230200400600
20172018201920202021202220230200400600
20172018201920202021202220230200400600
20172018201920202021202220230200400600
Additional affiliations
August 2022 - present
Indiana University Bloomington
Position
  • Professor
July 2012 - June 2022
The University of Memphis
Position
  • Professor
July 2011 - July 2012
Baycrest
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (193)
Article
Significance Musicianship is widely reported to enhance auditory brain processing related to speech–language function. Such benefits could reflect true experience-dependent plasticity, as often assumed, or innate, preexisting differences in auditory system function (i.e., nurture vs. nature). By recording speech-evoked electroencephalograms, we sho...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Real time modulation of brainstem frequency-following responses (FFRs) by online changes in cortical arousal state via the corticofugal (top-down) pathway has been demonstrated previously in young adults and is more prominent in the presence of background noise. FFRs during high cortical arousal states also have a stronger relationship...
Article
Full-text available
Considerable work suggests the dominant syllable rhythm of the acoustic envelope is remarkably similar across languages (∼4–5 Hz) and that oscillatory brain activity tracks these quasi-periodic rhythms to facilitate speech processing. However, whether this fundamental periodicity represents a common organizing principle in both auditory and motor s...
Article
The brain transforms continuous acoustic events into discrete category representations to downsample the speech signal for our perceptual-cognitive systems. Such phonetic categories are highly malleable, and their percepts can change depending on surrounding stimulus context. Previous work suggests these acoustic-phonetic mapping and perceptual war...
Article
Full-text available
The process of categorizing sounds into distinct phonetic categories is known as categorical perception (CP). Response times (RTs) provide a measure of perceptual difficulty during labeling decisions (i.e., categorization). The RT is quasi-stochastic in nature due to individuality and variations in perceptual tasks. To identify the source of RT var...
Preprint
Full-text available
The process of categorizing sounds into distinct phonetic categories is known as categorical perception (CP). Response times (RTs) provide a measure of perceptual difficulty during labeling decisions (i.e., categorization). The RT is quasi-stochastic in nature due to individuality and variations in perceptual tasks. To identify the source of RT var...
Article
Full-text available
Objective assays of human cochlear synaptopathy (CS) have been challenging to develop. It is suspected that relative summating potential (SP) changes are different in listeners with CS. In this proof-of-concept study, young, normal-hearing adults were recruited and assigned to a low/high-risk group for having CS based on their extended audiograms (...
Article
Full-text available
The “cocktail party” problem—how a listener perceives speech in noisy environments—is typically studied using speech (multi-talker babble) or noise maskers. However, realistic cocktail party scenarios often include background music (e.g., coffee shops, concerts). Studies investigating music’s effects on concurrent speech perception have predominant...
Article
Full-text available
Music training was shown to induce changes in auditory processing in older adults. However, most findings stem from correlational studies and fewer examine long-term sustainable benefits. Moreover, research shows small and variable changes in auditory event-related potential (ERP) amplitudes and/or latencies in older adults. Conventional time domai...
Preprint
Full-text available
The neural mechanisms underlying the exogenous coding and neural entrainment to rapid auditory stimuli have seen a recent surge of interest. However, few studies have characterized how parametric changes in stimulus presentation alter entrained responses. Applying inter-trial phase-locking (ITPL) and phase-locking value (PLV) analyses applied to hi...
Article
Experimental evidence in animals demonstrates cortical neurons innervate subcortex bilaterally to tune brainstem auditory coding. Yet, the role of the descending (corticofugal) auditory system in modulating earlier sound processing in humans during speech perception remains unclear. Here, we measured EEG activity as listeners performed speech ident...
Preprint
Full-text available
Objective assays of human cochlear synaptopathy have been equivocal. We posited relative changes in the cochlear summating potential (SP) may offer a superior biomarker for synaptic integrity. We recruited young, normal-hearing adults assigned to low- vs. high-risk groups based on their extended high-frequency (9-16 kHz) audiograms. SPs to paired-c...
Preprint
The “cocktail party” problem – how a listener perceives speech in noisy environments – is typically studied using speech (multi-talker babble) or noise maskers. However, realistic cocktail party scenarios often include background music (e.g., coffee shops, concerts). Studies investigating music’s effects on concurrent speech perception have predomi...
Preprint
The brain transforms continuous acoustic events into discrete category representations to downsample the speech signal for our perceptual-cognitive systems. Such phonetic categories are highly malleable and heir percepts can change depending on surrounding stimulus context. Previous work suggests these acoustic-phonetic mapping and perceptual warpi...
Article
Objective: We investigated auditory temporal processing in children with amblyaudia (AMB), a subtype of auditory processing disorder (APD), via cortical neural entrainment. Design and study samples: Evoked responses were recorded to click-trains at slow vs. fast (8.5 vs. 14.9/s) rates in n = 14 children with AMB and n = 11 age-matched controls....
Article
Full-text available
Emerging evidence suggests transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can improve cognitive performance in older adults. Similarly, music listening may improve arousal and stimulate subsequent performance on memory-related tasks. We examined the synergistic effects of tDCS paired with music listening on auditory neurobehavioral measures to inve...
Article
Full-text available
There is growing interest in developing training programs to mitigate cognitive decline associated with normal aging. Here, we assessed the effect of 3‐month music and visual art training programs on the oscillatory brain activity of older adults using a partially randomized intervention design. High‐density electroencephalography (EEG) was measure...
Article
Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) commonly results in more rapid cognitive and behavioral declines than typical aging. Individuals with MCI can exhibit impaired receptive speech abilities that may reflect neurophysiological changes in auditory-sensory processing prior to usual cognitive deficits. Benefits from current interventions targeting communic...
Preprint
Realtime modulation of brainstem frequency-following responses (FFRs) by online changes in cortical arousal state via the corticofugal (top-down) pathway has been demonstrated previously in younger humans and is more prominent in the presence of background noise. FFRs during high cortical arousal states also have a stronger relationship with speech...
Article
Full-text available
Categorizing sounds into meaningful groups helps listeners more efficiently process the auditory scene and is a foundational skill for speech perception and language development. Yet, how auditory categories develop in the brain through learning, particularly for non-speech sounds (e.g., music), is not well understood. Here, we asked musically naïv...
Preprint
Full-text available
Experimental evidence in animals demonstrates cortical neurons innervate subcortex bilaterally to tune brainstem auditory coding. Yet, the role of the descending (corticofugal) auditory system in modulating earlier sound processing in humans during speech perception remains unclear. Here, we measured EEG activity as listeners performed speech ident...
Article
Full-text available
Surrounding context influences speech listening, resulting in dynamic shifts to category percepts. To examine its neural basis, event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during vowel identification with continua presented in random, forward, and backward orders to induce perceptual warping. Behaviorally, sequential order shifted individual list...
Article
No PDF available ABSTRACT We investigated auditory temporal processing in children with amblyaudia (AMB), a subtype of auditory processing disorder, via cortical neural entrainment. Evoked responses were recorded to click-trains at slow versus fast (8.5 versus 14.9/sec) rates in n = 14 children with AMB and n = 11 age-matched controls. Source and t...
Article
"Cocktail party" speech perception is largely studied using either linguistic or nonspeech noise maskers. Few studies have addressed how listeners understand speech during concurrent music. We used popular songs to probe the effects of familiarity and different inherent properties of background music (i.e., isolated vocals, isolated instruments, or...
Preprint
Spoken language comprehension requires listeners map continuous features of the speech signal to discrete category labels. Categories are however malleable to surrounding context; listeners’ percept can dynamically shift depending on the sequencing of adjacent stimuli resulting in a warping of the heard phonetic category (i.e., hysteresis). Here, w...
Article
Purpose The study aimed to examine whether oral reading prosody—the use of acoustic features (e.g., pitch and duration variations) when reading passages aloud—predicts reading fluency and comprehension abilities. Method We measured vocabulary, syntax, word reading, reading fluency (including rate and accuracy), reading comprehension (in Grades 3 a...
Preprint
Surrounding context influences speech listening, resulting in dynamic shifts to category percepts. To examine its neural basis, event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during vowel identification with continua presented in random, forward, and backward orders to induce perceptual nonlinearities. Behaviorally, sequential order shifted listener...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding the many-to-many mapping between patterns of functional brain connectivity and discrete behavioral responses is critical for speech-language processing. We present a microstate-based analysis of EEG recordings to characterize spatio-temporal dynamics of neural activities that underly rapid speech categorization decisions. We implement...
Preprint
Full-text available
Objective We investigated auditory temporal processing in children with amblyaudia (AMB), a subtype of auditory processing disorder, via cortical neural entrainment. Design and study samples Evoked responses were recorded to click-trains at slow vs. fast (8.5 vs. 14.9/sec) rates in n=14 children with AMB and n=11 age-matched controls. Source and t...
Article
In nonlinear systems, the inclusion of low-level noise can paradoxically improve signal detection, a phenomenon known as stochastic resonance (SR). SR has been observed in human hearing whereby sensory thresholds (e.g., signal detection and discrimination) are enhanced in the presence of noise. Here, we asked whether subcortical auditory processing...
Article
Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is characteristic of Usher syndrome type 2 (USH2), but less is known about SNHL in nonsyndromic autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP) and olfaction in USH2A‐associated retinal degeneration. The Rate of Progression of USH2A‐related Retinal Degeneration (RUSH2A) is a natural history study that enrolled 127...
Article
Full-text available
Objective Children diagnosed with auditory processing disorder (APD) show deficits in processing complex sounds that are associated with difficulties in higher-order language, learning, cognitive, and communicative functions. Amblyaudia (AMB) is a subcategory of APD characterized by abnormally large ear asymmetries in dichotic listening tasks. Met...
Preprint
Full-text available
Categorizing sounds into meaningful groups helps listeners more efficiently process the auditory scene and is a foundational skill for speech perception and language development. Yet, how auditory categories develop in the brain through learning, particularly for nonspeech sounds, is not well understood. Here, we asked musically naïve listeners to...
Preprint
Full-text available
Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) commonly impacts older adults resulting in more rapid cognitive and behavioral declines than typical aging. Individuals with MCI can exhibit impaired receptive speech abilities that may reflect neurophysiological changes in auditory-sensory processing prior to usual cognitive deficits. Benefits from current intervent...
Article
Categorical perception (CP) of audio is critical to understand how the human brain perceives speech sounds despite widespread variability in acoustic properties. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal characteristics of auditory neural activity that reflects CP for speech (i.e., differentiates phonetic prototypes from ambiguous speech sounds). We...
Article
Categorical perception (CP) describes how the human brain categorizes speech despite inherent acoustic variability. We examined neural correlates of CP in both evoked and induced electroencephalogram (EEG) activity to evaluate which mode best describes the process of speech categorization. Listeners labeled sounds from a vowel gradient while we rec...
Article
Full-text available
Perceiving speech-in-noise (SIN) demands precise neural coding between brainstem and cortical levels of the hearing system. Attentional processes can then select and prioritize task-relevant cues over competing background noise for successful speech perception. In animal models, brainstem-cortical interplay is achieved via descending corticofugal p...
Article
Full-text available
Cross-linguistic studies have reported that prosodic pattern awareness (e.g., lexical stress and lexical tone) is more important to reading acquisition than phonological awareness. However, few longitudinal studies have been conducted to explore the relations between these variables. This study examined preschoolers’ pitch discrimination, prosodic...
Article
Speech perception requires the grouping of acoustic information into meaningful phonetic units via the process of categorical perception (CP). Environmental masking influences speech perception and CP. However, it remains unclear at which stage of processing (encoding, decision, or both) masking affects listeners’ categorization of speech signals....
Article
Full-text available
Scalp-recorded frequency-following responses (FFRs) reflect a mixture of phase-locked activity across the auditory pathway. FFRs have been widely used as a neural barometer of complex listening skills, especially speech-in noise (SIN) perception. Applying individually optimized source reconstruction to speech-FFRs recorded via EEG (FFREEG), we asse...
Article
Categorical judgments of otherwise identical phonemes are biased toward hearing words (i.e., “Ganong effect”) suggesting lexical context influences perception of even basic speech primitives. Lexical biasing could manifest via late stage postperceptual mechanisms related to decision or, alternatively, top–down linguistic inference that acts on earl...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Several studies have revealed that prosody contributes to reading acquisition. However, the relation between awareness of prosodic patterns and different facets of language ability (e.g., vocabulary knowledge) in school-age children remains unclear. This study measured awareness of prosodic patterns using non-speech and speech stimuli....
Article
Full-text available
Working memory (WM) is a fundamental construct of human cognition. The neural basis of auditory WM is thought to reflect a distributed brain network consisting of canonical memory and central executive brain regions including frontal lobe and hippocampus. Yet, the role of auditory (sensory) cortex in supporting active memory representations remains...
Preprint
Full-text available
Percepts are naturally grouped into meaningful categories to process continuous stimulus variations in the environment. Theories of category acquisition have existed for decades, but how they arise in the brain due to learning is not well understood. Here, advanced computational modeling techniques borrowed from educational data mining and cognitiv...
Preprint
Full-text available
Children diagnosed with auditory processing disorder (APD) show deficits in processing complex sounds that are associated with difficulties in higher-order language, learning, cognitive, and communicative functions. Amblyaudia (AMB) is a subcategory of APD characterized by abnormally large ear asymmetries in dichotic listening tasks. Here, we exami...
Preprint
Categorical perception (CP) describes how the human brain categorizes speech despite inherent acoustic variability. We examined neural correlates of CP in both evoked and induced EEG activity to evaluate which mode best describes the process of speech categorization. Using source reconstructed EEG, we used band-specific evoked and induced neural ac...
Preprint
Full-text available
Perceiving speech-in-noise (SIN) demands precise neural coding between brainstem and cortical levels of the hearing system. Attentional processes can then select and prioritize task-relevant cues over competing background noise for successful speech perception. In animal models, brainstem-cortical interplay is achieved via descending corticofugal p...
Preprint
Full-text available
Speech perception requires the grouping of acoustic information into meaningful phonetic units via the process of categorical perception (CP). Environmental masking influences speech perception and CP. However, it remains unclear at which stage of processing (encoding, decision, or both) masking affects listeners’ categorization of speech signals....
Preprint
Full-text available
Categorical judgments of otherwise identical phonemes are biased toward hearing words (i.e., "Ganong effect") suggesting lexical context influences perception of even basic speech primitives. Lexical biasing could manifest via late stage post-perceptual mechanisms related to decision or alternatively, top-down linguistic inference which acts on ear...
Preprint
Full-text available
Working memory (WM) is a fundamental construct of human cognition that predicts important faculties such as language abilities and scholastic achievement. The neural basis of auditory WM is thought to reflect a distributed brain network consisting of canonical memory and central executive brain regions including frontal lobe, prefrontal areas, and...
Preprint
Categorical perception (CP) of audio is critical to understand how the human brain perceives speech sounds despite widespread variability in acoustic properties. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal characteristics of auditory neural activity that reflects CP for speech (i.e., differentiates phonetic prototypes from ambiguous speech sounds). We...
Article
Full-text available
Studies suggest that long-term music experience enhances the brain’s ability to segregate speech from noise. Musicians’ “speech-in-noise (SIN) benefit” is based largely on perception from simple figure-ground tasks rather than competitive, multi-talker scenarios that offer realistic spatial cues for segregation and engage binaural processing. We ai...
Conference Paper
Speech-in-noise (SIN) comprehension decreases with age, and these declines have been related to social isolation, depression, and dementia in the elderly. In this work, we build models to distinguish the normal hearing (NH) or mild hearing impairment (HI) using the different genres of machine learning. We compute band wise power spectral density (P...
Article
Full-text available
Speech perception in noisy environments depends on complex interactions between sensory and cognitive systems. In older adults, such interactions may be affected, especially in those individuals who have more severe age-related hearing loss. Using a data-driven approach, we assessed the temporal (when in time) and spatial (where in the brain) chara...
Article
Objective Localization of epileptic seizures, usually characterized by abnormal hypersynchronous wave patterns from the cortex, remains elusive. We present a novel, robust method for automatic localization of seizures on the scalp from clinical electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Methods Seizure patient EEG data was decomposed via the Hilbert Transfo...
Article
The frequency-following response (FFR) is an EEG-based potential used to characterize the brainstem encoding of complex sounds. Adopting techniques from auditory signal processing, we assessed the degree to which FFRs encode important properties of cochlear processing (e.g. nonlinearities) and their relation to speech-in-noise (SIN) listening skill...
Preprint
Full-text available
The frequency-following response (FFR) is a scalp-recorded potential reflecting a mixture of phase-locked neural activity generated from several nuclei along the auditory pathway. FFRs have been widely used as a neural barometer of complex listening skills especially performance on speech-in noise (SIN) tasks: across listeners with various hearing...
Article
Full-text available
[This corrects the article DOI: 10.3389/fnins.2019.01418.].
Article
Full-text available
We investigated whether the categorical perception (CP) of speech might also provide a mechanism that aids its perception in noise. We varied signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) [clear, 0 dB, −5 dB] while listeners classified an acoustic-phonetic continuum (/u/ to /a/). Noise-related changes in behavioral categorization were only observed at the lowest SNR...
Article
Full-text available
Human perception requires the many-to-one mapping between continuous sensory elements and discrete categorical representations. This grouping operation underlies the phenomenon of categorical perception (CP)—the experience of perceiving discrete categories rather than gradual variations in signal input. Speech perception requires CP because acousti...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Categorical perception (CP) is an inherent property of speech perception. The response time (RT) of listeners' perceptual speech identification is highly sensitive to individual differences. While the neural correlates of CP have been well studied in terms of the regional contributions of the brain to behavior, functional connectivity p...
Article
During successful auditory perception, the human brain classifies diverse acoustic information into meaningful groupings, a process known as categorical perception (CP). Intense auditory experiences (e.g., musical training and language expertise) shape categorical representations necessary for speech identification and novel sound-to-meaning learni...
Article
Full-text available
Speech comprehension difficulties are ubiquitous to aging and hearing loss, particularly in noisy environments. Older adults’ poorer speech-in-noise (SIN) comprehension has been related to abnormal neural representations within various nodes (regions) of the speech network, but how senescent changes in hearing alter the transmission of brain signal...
Article
Difficulty understanding speech-in-noise (SIN) is a pervasive problem faced by older adults particularly those with hearing loss. Previous studies have identified structural and functional changes in the brain that contribute to older adults' speech perception difficulties. Yet, many of these studies use neuroimaging techniques that evaluate only g...
Article
Rising intensity sounds signal approaching objects traveling toward an observer. A variety of species preferentially respond to looming over receding auditory motion, reflecting an evolutionary perceptual bias for recognizing approaching threats. We probed the neural origins of this stark perceptual anisotropy to reveal how the brain creates privil...
Preprint
Speech comprehension in noisy environments depends on complex interactions between sensory and cognitive systems. In older adults, such interactions may be affected, especially in those individuals who have more severe age-related hearing loss. Using a data-driven approach, we assessed the temporal (when in time) and spatial (where in the brain) ch...
Article
Speech-in-noise (SIN) comprehension deficits in older adults have been linked to changes in both subcortical and cortical auditory evoked responses. However, older adults' difficulty understanding SIN may also be related to an imbalance in signal transmission (i.e., functional connectivity) between brainstem and auditory cortices. By modeling high-...
Article
Objectives: In noisy environments, listeners benefit from both hearing and seeing a talker, demonstrating audiovisual (AV) cues enhance speech-in-noise (SIN) recognition. Here, we examined the relative contribution of auditory and visual cues to SIN perception and the strategies used by listeners to decipher speech in noise interference(s). Desig...
Article
Speech perception requires grouping acoustic information into meaningful linguistic-phonetic units via categorical perception (CP). Beyond shrinking observers' perceptual space, CP might aid degraded speech perception if categories are more resistant to noise than surface acoustic features. Combining audiovisual (AV) cues also enhances speech recog...
Article
To construct our perceptual world, the brain categorizes variable sensory cues into behaviorally-relevant groupings. Categorical representations are apparent within a distributed fronto-temporo-parietal brain network but how this neural circuitry is shaped by experience remains undefined. Here, we asked whether speech and music categories might be...
Preprint
Full-text available
Categorical perception (CP) is an inherent property of speech perception. The response time (RT) of listeners perceptual speech identification are highly sensitive to individual differences. While the neural correlates of CP have been well studied in terms of the regional contributions of the brain to behavior, functional connectivity patterns that...
Preprint
To construct our perceptual world, the brain categorizes variable sensory cues into behaviorally-relevant groupings. Categorical representations are apparent within a distributed fronto-temporo-parietal brain network but how this neural circuitry is shaped by experience remains undefined. Here, we asked whether speech (and music) categories might b...
Preprint
We investigated whether the categorical perception (CP) of speech might also provide a mechanism that aids its perception in noise. We varied signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) [clear, 0 dB, -5 dB] while listeners classified an acoustic-phonetic continuum (/u/ to /a/). Noise-related changes in behavioral categorization were only observed at the lowest SNR...