Garold Murray

Garold Murray
Okayama University · Center for Liberal Arts and Language Education

PhD, MEd, BEd, BA

About

44
Publications
20,291
Reads
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884
Citations
Citations since 2016
13 Research Items
602 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
Introduction
Garold Murray holds a PhD in language education from the University of British Columbia, Canada. In addition to having taught EFL courses in junior high school, high school, undergraduate, graduate, and teacher education programs, he established and managed two self-access centres in Japan – one of which was open to the general public. His research interests focus on learner autonomy, social learning spaces (as complex dynamic ecosocial systems), imagination, and semiotics of place. He is editor of the book The Social Dimensions of Learner Autonomy (2014) and co-editor of the books Identity, Motivation, and Autonomy in Language Learning (2011); Social Spaces for Language Learning: Stories from the L-café (2016); and Space, Place and Autonomy in Language Learning (2018).
Additional affiliations
January 2009 - June 2016
Okayama University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
April 1998 - March 2004
Tokai University
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (44)
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines how learner autonomy and self-regulated learning might be related by comparing and contrasting the two constructs. After identifying the traits learner autonomy and self-regulated learning have in common, I argue that in order to understand how they differ we have to look beyond a discrete point comparison of their features. Giv...
Book
Learner autonomy in language learning, initially associated with independence, is now viewed as a capacity that can be developed in social contexts involving learner interdependence and collaboration. In this volume researchers, most of whom are also language teachers, from Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, and North and South America, explore the socia...
Book
In this volume researchers from Asia, Europe, the Middle East and North and South America employ a variety of theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches in their exploration of the links between identity, motivation, and autonomy in language learning. On a conceptual level the authors explore issues related to agency, metacognition, ima...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports on an ethnographic inquiry into the linguistic and sociocultural affordances available to English and Japanese foreign language learners through their engagement in a social learning space at a Japanese university. By social learning space we refer to a facility in which students come together in order to learn with and from each...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores pedagogical practices which can support the role of imagination in foreign language learning. Over the past decade, work on self and identity in motivation research—most notably Norton’s (2001) imagined communities and Dörnyei’s (2009) L2 Motivational Self System—has suggested that teachers might foster students’ motivation by h...
Article
Full-text available
The central argument of this paper is that self-access centres transformed into social learning spaces have the potential to become self-enriching complex dynamic ecosocial systems. As such, they can support the emergence of a wide variety of affordances for language learning. While complex dynamic systems cannot be created and the process of emerg...
Book
This book explores theories of space and place in relation to autonomy in language learning. Encompassing a wide range of linguistically and culturally diverse learning contexts, this edited collection brings together research papers from academics working in fifteen countries. In their studies, these researchers examine physical, virtual and metap...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter proposes a new research direction into autonomy in language learning: an exploration of its spatial dimension. Based on a longitudinal ethnographic inquiry into a social learning space in a language centre in a Japanese university, a key assumption of the study is that how people define a space transforms it into a place, determines wh...
Article
Full-text available
In this era of globalization, Japanese universities will have to accommodate an increasing number of local students wishing to learn foreign languages and they will also have to welcome more international students to their campuses. While universities will undoubtedly take steps to ensure that both groups have positive educational and intercultural...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past four decades, learner autonomy in language learning has been quietly moving across what might be viewed as three paradigms in applied linguistics. When learner autonomy was introduced in the late 1970s, language classrooms were largely teacher-dominated. At that time, learner autonomy offered a much-needed focus on learners as individ...
Article
Full-text available
Learner autonomy is a construct in motion, unfolding in step with our academic imaginary. Over the past forty years, it has demonstrated its capacity to adapt to changing times. Introduced in the late 1970s during an era characterized by the teacher-dominated language classroom, learner autonomy provided a much-needed focus on learners as potential...
Chapter
In this concluding chapter to a narrative inquiry, the authors discuss the results of a thematic content analysis of sixteen stories by administrators, teachers and students in which they write about their experiences in the L-café, a social space for language learning located on the campus of a Japanese university. Drawing on complex dynamic syste...
Chapter
This chapter presents a thematic content analysis of sixteen narratives by administrators, teachers and students in which they write about their experiences in a social space for language learning at a Japanese university. Drawing on complex dynamic systems theory as well as theories of space and place, the authors explore the affordances for langu...
Chapter
This chapter chronicles a narrative inquiry comprised of a collection of sixteen stories about how students, teachers and administrators experience the L-café, a social space for foreign language learning located on the campus of a large national university in Japan. Adopting a narrative style, this introductory chapter begins with a description of...
Book
Full-text available
Social spaces for language learning, places where learners can come together in order to learn with and from each other, have an important role to play in foreign language acquisition and L2 identity development. In this book, sixteen students, teachers and administrators tell how they experience the L-café, a social language learning space located...
Chapter
This chapter chronicles a narrative inquiry comprised of a collection of sixteen stories about how students, teachers and administrators experience the L-café, a social space for foreign language learning located on the campus of a large national university in Japan. Adopting a narrative style, this introductory chapter begins with a description of...
Conference Paper
This paper examines a new direction for research into autonomy in language learning: an exploration of its spatial dimension. It does this by reporting on a longitudinal ethnographic inquiry into a social learning space dedicated to language learning, located on the campus of a large national university in Japan. Although social learning spaces may...
Conference Paper
Social learning spaces have been created at universities around the world as places where students can come together in order to learn with and from each other. These facilities provide spaces for the emergence of communities of practice. However, this construct has been criticized on the grounds that it raises boundary and membership issues, probl...
Conference Paper
In this paper we explore the relationship between space, in terms of the physical dimension size, and learner autonomy. We do this by reporting on a longitudinal ethnographic inquiry into a social learning space dedicated to language learning. Although social learning spaces may physically resemble self-access centers, we see the distinguishing and...
Chapter
Paradoxical as it might seem, most of the authors contributing to this exploration of the social dimensions of autonomy in language learning began their chapter by referring to Holec’s seminal definition. He defined autonomy as ‘the ability to take charge of one’s own learning’ (Holec 1981: 3), and, in doing so, situated the construct squarely on t...
Chapter
This book, exploring the social dimensions of learner autonomy, brings together research papers by educators working in a variety of language learning contexts. The collection of papers had its origins in a symposium with the same name held at the International Association of Applied Linguistics (AILA) 2012 World Congress in Beijing. Although this...
Chapter
In a New York Times article commenting on the protest movements which unsettled the status quo from Tahrir Square in Cairo to Zuccotti Park in New York City, the author cautions that ‘we tend to underestimate the political power of physical places’ (Kimmelman 2011: SRI). In this chapter we argue that neither should we underestimate the power of pla...
Conference Paper
In this essay I examine the role conference dinners have had in creating and sustaining an imagined community of educators dedicated to the promotion of autonomy in language learning.
Chapter
This paper explores the potential of an independent learning model as a means to foster students’ motivation by helping them to imagine and actualise possible L2 selves. It does this by reporting on a research project investigating the experiences of Japanese first-year university students studying English in a self-directed learning course. In acc...
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper explores the role of metacognition and imagination in language learning. It does this by reporting on a three-year research project which investigated the learning experiences of Japanese first-year university students who were working to improve their English language proficiency in a self- directed learning course. The course was based...
Chapter
Full-text available
While much of the literature in the area of language education focuses on young people learning primarily in formal settings, this chapter examines the topic of designing out-of-class learning opportunities for older learners. This chapter explores this largely neglected area by reporting on a project that provided self-access English language lear...
Conference Paper
This paper explores the dynamics of conducting a narrative inquiry when the participant takes on the role of co-researcher. The study reported here is part of an ongoing life history research project investigating how foreign language learners can attain advanced levels of oral proficiency without studying or living in a target language environment...
Article
Full-text available
Metacognitive knowledge – what students know about themselves, the tasks they complete and their learning strategies – is essential for successful self-directed learning. It follows that those who work in self-directed learning settings need to stimulate their students’ metacognitive development. Previous research in metacognition has defined its c...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter outlines a course which integrates self-access language learning and classroom-based instruction. More specifically, it describes a required, credit-bearing course in independent language learning which is part of an English for Academic Purposes Programme. The programme, offered to first-year students in a Japanese university whose me...
Chapter
Full-text available
1. Have you heard any good stories lately? What is it about stories that we find so appealing? 2. How pervasive is our use of stories or narratives? Brainstorm — with a partner or on your own — examples of narratives or stories in our daily lives (for example, news stories). What useful purposes do they serve in our daily lives? 3. How can the rete...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports on a life history research project which involves collecting the language learning stories of adult Japanese English foreign language (EFL) learners who have attained intermediate to advanced levels of fluency without having studied or lived overseas. In these stories the learners reveal what they did to learn the language outsid...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter reports on a life history research project designed to collect the language learning stories of Japanese who have attained intermediate to advanced levels of English language proficiency without having studied or lived outside of Japan. As a part of the learning process, these learners become members of social groups which can be chara...
Chapter
Two key themes in the continuing development of theory and practice in the area of learner autonomy are out-of-class language learning and the quest for research methodologies suitable for the exploration of self-direction and self-instruction. This paper addresses these issues by reporting on a life history research project which involves collecti...
Article
Full-text available
This article offers communicative activities designed to enhance the cross-cultural awareness of Japanese university students whose language levels range from beginner to intermediate. Facilitating the development of cross-cultural awareness of foreign language students who have never lived in another culture or even visited one can be problematic....
Article
Full-text available
This article reports on a classroom-based research project exploring the learning experiences of 30 Japanese English-as-a-second-language (ESL) exchange students in an environment highlighting learner autonomy and the use of technology. It first addresses a growing concern among practitioners, that is, how to create a learning environment that faci...
Article
Computer-assisted language learning literature points to a need for experimentation with innovative learning structures in order to realize the full potential of recent technological developments. Current trends indicate that this will necessitate broadening our understanding of learner autonomy and its role in the complex learning and technology n...
Article
While there has been discussion in the literature concerning the need to identify research methods appropriate to the investigation of computer-assisted language learning (CALL), what appears to be missing is an examination of the effectiveness of particular methods in specific circumstances. This article reflects on a configuration of methods—pers...
Article
Based on their ongoing research and development activities, the authors examine the potential for autonomous learning programmes to address the problems of first (minority) language loss. The first section of this paper outlines some of the personal, political, and practical arguments in favour of preventing first language loss during second langua...

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