Gareth R Hopkins

Gareth R Hopkins
Western Oregon University | WOU · Department of Biology

BSc, PhD

About

39
Publications
17,591
Reads
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515
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2010 - present
Utah State University
Position
  • PhD Student
June 2008 - June 2010
Natural Resources Canada
Position
  • Research Assistant
September 2005 - May 2010
University of Northern British Columbia
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (39)
Article
Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a recognised disruptor of biological function and ecological communities. Despite increasing research effort, we know little regarding the effect of ALAN on woody plants, including trees, or its indirect effects on their colonising invertebrates. These effects have the potential to disrupt woodland food webs by d...
Article
Urbanization transforms environments in ways that alter biological evolution. We examined whether urban environmental change drives parallel evolution by sampling 110,019 white clover plants from 6169 populations in 160 cities globally. Plants were assayed for a Mendelian antiherbivore defense that also affects tolerance to abiotic stressors. Urban...
Article
The introduction of artificial light at night (ALAN) into natural and urbanised landscapes is a known and highly pervasive disruptor of invertebrate communities. However, the effect of variation in intensity and spectra of ALAN on invertebrate communities inhabiting different spatial niches is little understood. Further, the remarkable ability of A...
Article
Toxin-resistant predators may suffer costs from eating chemically-defended prey and do not feed exclusively on toxic prey. Common Gartersnakes (Thamnophis sirtalis) (Linnaeus, 1758) have been considered the drivers of an evolutionary arms race with highly toxic newts (Taricha spp.), which they consume with few or no deleterious effects. However, ho...
Article
While there is huge promise in monitoring physiological parameters in free-living organisms, we also find high amounts of variability over time and space. This variation requires us to capitalize on long-term physiological monitoring to adequately address questions of population health, conservation status, or evolutionary trends as long-term sampl...
Article
Ecosystem disturbance through urbanization and agriculture, coupled with anthropogenic climate change, poses a pervasive threat to ecosystem health. Such landscape disturbance can manifest as salinization, particularly in Australia. Increasing salinization of both soils and waterways has the potential to render habitats unsuitable for amphibians. H...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic factors, such as artificial light at night (ALAN), are increasingly linked to significant modifications in animal behaviours, such as foraging or migration. However, few studies have investigated directly whether the presence of ALAN affects the ability to find a mate (mate location). One direct effect of the presence of ALAN is that...
Article
Full-text available
Light is fundamental to biological systems, affecting the daily rhythms of bacteria, plants, and animals. Artificial light at night (ALAN), a ubiquitous feature of urbanization, interferes with these rhythms and has the potential to exert strong selection pressures on organisms living in urban environments. ALAN also fragments landscapes, altering...
Article
Litoria cyclorhyncha is a hylid frog native to southwest Western Australia (WA). It was first recorded in South Australia (SA) in 2000 and has established a breeding population in Streaky Bay on the western Eyre Peninsula since at least 2011. L. cyclorhyncha is a relatively large predatory frog that presents a potential threat to fauna and ecosyste...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing evidence suggests that key fitness-related behaviours of animals related to courtship and mating may be disrupted by anthropogenic stressors, including artificial light at night (i.e. light produced from anthropogenic sources). Despite its ubiquity in urban habitats, we currently know very little about how artificial night lighting affec...
Article
Full-text available
To accurately predict the impact of environmental change, it is necessary to assay effects of key interacting stressors on vulnerable organisms, and the potential resiliency of their populations. Yet, for the most part, these critical data are missing. We examined the effects of two common abiotic stressors predicted to interact with climate change...
Data
Alternate analysis of sublethal effects and description of intrapopulation variation in responses
Article
Full-text available
The neuropeptide kisspeptin and its receptor are essential for activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and regulating reproduction. While the role of kisspeptin in regulating the HPG axis in mammals has been well established, little is known about the functional ability of kisspeptins to activate the HPG axis and associated beha...
Article
Full-text available
While the use of nanoparticles has dramatically increased in recent years, the ecological consequences are not well known. In particular, little research has been done to investigate the potentially detrimental effects of nanoparticles on amphibians, especially across all life-history stages of salamanders and newts (caudates). To address this dear...
Article
Full-text available
Freshwater organisms are increasingly exposed to elevated salinity in their habitats, presenting physiological challenges to homeostasis. Amphibians are particularly vulnerable to osmotic stress and yet are often subject to high salinity in a variety of inland and coastal environments around the world. Here, we examine the physiological responses t...
Article
Full-text available
Amphibians are well known as osmotically sensitive organisms due to their highly permeable skin and eggs and, as such, biologists have mostly discounted their presence in saline environments. Yet, from the 1800s to the present day, scientists have repeatedly found amphibians living and breeding in a variety of saline coastal and inland habitats. De...
Article
Full-text available
Freshwater crayfish are reported to consume early life-history stages of a number of toxic amphibians. Although previous research indicates toxic amphibians are palatable to crayfish, the potential toxicity associated with consumption of toxic prey has been poorly described. We sought to characterise the supposed tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistance of fr...
Article
Full-text available
The world is increasingly impacted by a variety of stressors that have the potential to differentially influence life history stages of organisms. Organisms have evolved to cope with some stressors, while with others they have little capacity. It is thus important to understand the effects of both developmental and evolutionary history on survival...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the effects of sub-lethal exposure of the ubiquitous pesticide malathion on the behavior of the model orthopteran species, the house cricket (Acheta domesticus). Increasing concentrations of malathion caused male crickets to increase periods of non-directional movement, such as twitching and grooming, directional movement, and t...
Article
Full-text available
The application of millions of tons of road deicing salts every winter in North America presents significant survival challenges to amphibians inhabiting roadside habitats. While much is known of the effects of NaCl on anuran tadpoles, less is known of effects on amphibian eggs, or any caudate life stage. In addition, little is known of the effects...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract The portable cases constructed by caddisfly larvae have been assumed to act as a mechanical defense against predatory attacks. However, previous studies have compared the survival of caddisflies with different cases, thereby precluding an analysis of the survival benefits of "weaker" case materials. The level of protection offered by caddi...
Article
Full-text available
Road-side aquatic ecosystems in North America are annually polluted with millions of tons of road deicing salts, which threaten the survival of amphibians which live and breed in these habitats. While much is known of the effects of NaCl, little is known of the second most-commonly used deicer, MgCl(2), which is now used exclusively in parts of the...
Article
Full-text available
The embryonic development and time to hatching of eggs can be highly adaptive in some species, and thus under selective pressure. In this study, we examined the underlying interfamily variation in hatching timing and embryonic development in a population of an oviparous amphibian, the rough-skinned newt (Taricha granulosa). We found significant, hi...
Article
Full-text available
The ability of prey to escape predation often lies in the occurrence and efficacy of their predator avoidance and antipredator behaviors, which are often coupled with specialized morphology. How the use and efficacy of these behaviors change throughout ontogeny may be indicative of the vulnerability and ecological roles these animals experience thr...
Article
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Caddisfly larvae are typically restricted to benthic microhabitats due to the presence of mobile tubular cases constructed out of mineral or organic material. Members of one family (Leptoceridae) use setae on extended metathoracic legs to swim. We describe the swimming behavior of a North American caddisfly, Triaenodes tardus, and experimentally ev...
Article
Full-text available
Aggregation is a common behaviour in a number of animal taxa and is used for a variety of purposes. For example, aggregation may be a response to environmental resources, sexual reproductive behaviour or an antipredator response. Although commonly recognized in a variety of taxa, amongst amphibians aggregation has rarely been reported in adult pois...
Article
Full-text available
Distasteful, noxious, and toxic secretions from skin glands have been demonstrated to play important antipredatory roles in amphibians. Previous studies suggest that the Long-toed Salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum), a widely distributed urodele found near the northern limit of its range in northern British Columbia, is distasteful to predators. T...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Warren root collar weevil Hylobius warreni Wood (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a native, long-lived, flightless insect distributed throughout coniferous forests across Canada. Adult weevils feed on all life stages of a variety of coniferous hosts. While adult feeding is not detrimental, larvae may girdle and kill young trees. Hence, the insect pose...
Article
1 Warren root collar weevil Hylobius warreni Wood (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a long-lived, flightless insect native to coniferous forests across northern North America. Girdling by larval feeding causes significant mortality on young trees. The insect poses considerable challenges to reforestation. 2 Adult weevils feed on all life stages of a v...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract—Two,non-destructive sexing techniques suitable for use in the field and laboratory are described, and tested with the Warren root collar weevil, Hylobius warreni Wood (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). On the second,visible abdominal,sternite of males is a longitudinal depression that is absent on females. In addition, setae on the last visible...
Article
Full-text available
Two non-destructive sexing techniques suitable for use in the field and laboratory are described, and tested with the Warren root collar weevil, Hylobius warreni Wood (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). On the second visible abdominal sternite of males is a longitudinal depression that is absent on females. In addition, setae on the last visible abdominal...