Gail Preston

Gail Preston
University of Oxford | OX · Department of Plant Sciences

BA (Hons), MA, PhD

About

162
Publications
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Additional affiliations
September 1997 - present
University of Oxford
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (162)
Article
Efficient plant immune responses depend on the ability to recognise an invading microbe. The 22-amino acids in the N-terminal domain and the 28-amino acids in the central region of the bacterial flagellin, called flg22 and flgII-28, respectively, are important elicitors of plant immunity. Plant immunity is activated after flg22 or flgII-28 recognit...
Article
Plants establish a pivotal relationship with their microbiome and are often conceptualized as holobionts. Nonetheless, holobiont theories have attracted much criticism, especially concerning the fact that the holobiont is rarely a unit of selection. In previous work, we discussed how the plant microbiome can be considered to be an ‘ecosystem on a l...
Article
Full-text available
Agroinfiltration in Nicotiana benthamiana is widely used to transiently express heterologous proteins in plants. However, the state of Agrobacterium itself is not well studied in agroinfiltrated tissues, despite the frequent studies of immunity genes through agroinfiltration. Here, we generated a bioluminescent strain of Agrobacterium tumefaciens G...
Article
Full-text available
Macroorganisms are colonized by microbial communities that exert important biological and ecological functions, the composition of which is subject to host control and has therefore been described as “an ecosystem on a leash”. However, domesticated organisms such as crop plants are subject to both artificial selection and natural selection exerted...
Article
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The lengthy process to generate transformed plants is a limitation in current research on the interactions of the model plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae with plant hosts. Here we present an easy method called agromonas, where we quantify P. syringae growth in agroinfiltrated leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana using a cocktail of antibiotics to sele...
Article
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Bacterial bioluminescence is widely used to study the spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterial populations and gene expression in vivo at a population level, but cannot easily be used to study bacterial activity at the level of individual cells. In this study we describe the development of a new library of mini‐Tn7‐lux and lux::eyfp reporter constructs...
Preprint
Full-text available
RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play critical roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation and are known to contribute to plant immunity. To understand the responses of cellular RBPs to an immune elicitor, we applied RNA interactome capture to Arabidopsis leaves treated with flg22. Strikingly, flg22 induced a pervasive remodelling of the cellular RBPo...
Preprint
Full-text available
The lengthy process to generate transformed plants is a limitation in current research on the interactions of the model plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae with plant hosts. Here we present an easy method called agromonas, where we quantify P. syringae growth in agroinfiltrated leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana using a cocktail of antibiotics to sele...
Article
Comparative and evolutionary analyses of metabolic networks have a wide range of applications, ranging from research into metabolic evolution through to practical applications in drug development, synthetic biology, and biodegradation. We present MAPPS: Metabolic network Analysis and Pathway Prediction Server (https://mapps.lums.edu.pk), a web-base...
Article
Full-text available
RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a crucial role in regulating RNA function and fate. However, the full complement of RBPs has only recently begun to be uncovered through proteome-wide approaches such as RNA interactome capture (RIC). RIC has been applied to various cell lines and organisms, including plants, greatly expanding the repertoire of RBPs...
Article
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In the metal hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens, zinc may provide a defence against pathogens. However, zinc accumulation is a variable trait in this species. We hypothesize that this variability affects the outcome of interactions between metal accumulation and the various constitutive and inducible defences that N. caerulescens shares wi...
Article
Natural biocides, such as cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) bark essential oil, have enormous potential as antimicrobials but are limited by their volatility and rapid degradation. To counteract this and to prolong the efficacy of the biocide, cinnamaldehyde (CNAD, the main bioactive compound of cinnamon essential oil) was encapsulated into mesoporo...
Article
Full-text available
Pseudomonas syringae is best known as a plant pathogenic bacterium that causes diseases in a multitude of hosts, and it has been used as a model organism to understand the biology of plant disease. Pathogenic and non-pathogenic isolates of P. syringae are also commonly found living as epiphytes and in the wider environment, including water sources...
Article
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The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, which causes halo blight disease of beans, contains a 106kb genomic island PPHGI‐1. PPHGI‐1 carries a gene, avrPphB, which encodes an effector protein that triggers a resistance response in certain bean cultivars. Previous studies have shown that when PPHGI‐1 is excised from the bacterial ch...
Chapter
Plant pathogens such as fungi, oomycetes, viruses and bacteria infect important crops and account for significant economic losses worldwide. Therefore, it is critical to gain insights into plant-pathogen interactions at the cellular and molecular level. The outcome of the interaction between plants and pathogens greatly differs depending on the spe...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Pseudomonas species are adapted to evade innate immune responses and can persist at sites of relative tissue hypoxia, including the mucus-plugged airways of patients with cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis. The ability of these bacteria to directly sense and respond to changes in local oxygen availability is in part consequent upon expr...
Article
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This work serves as a proof-of-concept for bacterially derived SimCells (Simple Cells), which contain the cell machinery from bacteria and designed DNA (or potentially a simplified genome) to instruct the cell to carry out novel, specific tasks. SimCells represent a reprogrammable chassis without a native chromosome, which can host designed DNA to...
Article
The application of RNA interactome capture to plants has enabled comprehensive determination of the plant RNA-binding proteome and the identification of novel families of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). The technique is providing insight into the evolution of the eukaryotic repertoire of RBPs and will enhance prospects for engineering RBPs to improve...
Article
Full-text available
The nonprotein amino acid γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the most abundant amino acid in the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaf apoplast and is synthesized by Arabidopsis thaliana in response to infection by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (hereafter called DC3000). High levels of exogenous GABA have previously been sho...
Article
One of the most fundamental questions in plant pathology is what determines whether a pathogen grows within a plant? This question is frequently studied in terms of the role of elicitors and pathogenicity factors in triggering or overcoming host defences. However, this focus fails to address the basic question of how the environment in host tissues...
Data
Fig. S1. PPHGI‐1 is lost from Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1302A::NCR during passaging though bean. Pph 1302A::NCR was passaged six times (each passage 7 days) through resistant bean cv. TG. At each passage, 200 colonies were tested on TG pods (A) and via antibiotic selection (B) for the loss of PPHGI‐1 and the percentage loss recorded. B...
Article
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Scientific Reports 6 : Article number: 29905; 10.1038/srep29905 published online: 23 August 2016 ; updated: 10 October 2016 . In the Supplementary Information file originally published with this Article, Reference 1 was omitted.
Article
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Cell sorting coupled with single-cell genomics is a powerful tool to circumvent cultivation of microorganisms and reveal microbial ‘dark matter’. Single-cell Raman spectra (SCRSs) are label-free biochemical ‘fingerprints’ of individual cells, which can link the sorted cells to their phenotypic information and ecological functions. We employed a nov...
Article
The interactions between microorganisms driven by substrate metabolism and energy flow are important to shape diversity, abundance, and structure of a microbial community. Single cell technologies are useful tools for dissecting the functions of individual members and their interactions in microbial communities. Here, we developed a novel Raman sta...
Article
Full-text available
The rice blast fungus causes significant annual harvest losses. It also serves as a genetically-tractable model to study fungal ingress. Whilst pathogenicity determinants have been unmasked and changes in global gene expression described, we know little about Magnaporthe oryzae cell wall remodelling. Our interests, in wall remodelling genes express...
Data
Data analysis for the expression profile of MGG_Crh2. (XLSX)
Data
Primer specificity analysis by melt-curve graphs for each targeted gene. Graphs show PCR product dissociation curves for ten primer pairs used in this analysis using pooled cDNA of WT from all samples used. The melt curve data was obtained from the denaturation of amplified PCR product executed at the end of a qRT-PCR run, by temperature increment....
Data
Real-Time PCR primer efficiency analysis. The cycle threshold (ct) of ten primer pairs for candidate reference genes plotted against a five-fold dilution of pooled cDNA from all samples analysed. Each qRT-PCR reaction had two technical replicates, therefore the cycle threshold (ct) value above is an averaged data. All reactions conducted on the sam...
Data
Sample RNA quality analysis by electrophoretic separation for samples containing only pathogen RNA. Each electrophoregram comprise of RNA of fungal tissue grown vegetatively under various conditions, dormant spore (0 hpi) or perithecia. Each graph showed the presence of two sharp peaks, corresponding to two bands on the right side of each graph, in...
Data
Primer specificity analysis by PCR and subsequent size separation by gel electrophoresis for each targeted gene. Products were PCR amplified using pooled cDNA template from all samples and size separated alongside GeneRuler Ultra Low Range DNA Ladder (10–300 bp). Gel electrophoresis was conducted in 2% agarose (SIGMA-Aldrich). (TIF)
Data
Sample RNA quality analysis by electrophoretic separation for samples containing RNA from both host and pathogen. Each electrophoregram comprise of RNA taken from host leaf tissue inoculated with fungal spores (in 0.2% gelatine) at various hours post inoculation (hpi). Control leaf comprise of plant leaf sprayed with 0.2% gelatine. Each graph above...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning research typically shows positive diversity- productivity relationships. However, local increases in species richness can increase competition within trophic levels, reducing the efficacy of intertrophic level population control. Pseudomonas spp. are a dominant group of soil bacteria that play key roles in pla...
Article
Full-text available
The co-evolution of bacterial plant pathogens and their hosts is a complex and dynamic process. Host resistance imposes stress on invading pathogens that can lead to changes in the bacterial genome enabling the pathogen to escape host resistance. We have observed this phenomenon with the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola where is...
Article
Full-text available
The apoplast is the arena in which endophytic pathogens such as Pseudomonas syringae grow and interact with plant cells. Using metabolomic and ion analysis techniques, this study shows how the composition of Phaseolus vulgaris leaf apoplastic fluid changes during the first six hours of compatible and incompatible interactions with two strains of Ps...
Article
Full-text available
Metal-hyperaccumulating plants, which are hypothesized to use metals for defence against pests and pathogens, provide a unique context in which to study plant – pathogen coevolution. Previously, we demonstrated that the high concentrations of zinc found in leaves of the hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens provide protection against bacterial path...
Article
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Antibiotic resistance carries a fitness cost that must be overcome in order for resistance to persist over the long term. Compensatory mutations that recover the functional defects associated with resistance mutations have been argued to play a key role in overcoming the cost of resistance, but compensatory mutations are expected to be rare relativ...
Data
Genome-wide mutations in sequenced endpoint isolates evolved from rifampicin-resistant mutants.
Data
Genome-wide mutations in sequenced endpoint isolates evolved from rifampicin-sensitive ancestral strain.
Article
Plants that interact with pathogenic bacteria in their natural environments have developed barriers to block or contain the infection. Phytopathogenic bacteria have evolved mechanisms to subvert these defenses and promote infection. Thus, the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) delivers bacterial effectors directly into the plant cells to alter host sig...
Article
Full-text available
Over 100 years after trypanosomatids were first discovered in plant tissues, Phytomonas parasites have now been isolated across the globe from members of 24 different plant families. Most identified species have not been associated with any plant pathology and to date only two species are definitively known to cause plant disease. These diseases (w...
Article
Full-text available
The apoplast is a distinct extracellular compartment in plant tissues that lies outside the plasma membrane and includes the cell wall. The apoplastic compartment of plant leaves is the site of several important biological processes, including cell wall formation, cellular nutrient and water uptake and export, plant-endophyte interactions and defen...
Article
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Unlabelled: Fitness costs play a key role in the evolutionary dynamics of antibiotic resistance in bacteria by generating selection against resistance in the absence of antibiotics. Although the genetic basis of antibiotic resistance is well understood, the precise molecular mechanisms linking the genetic basis of resistance to its fitness cost re...
Article
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The roles of 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases in eukaryotes include collagen stabilization, hypoxia sensing, and translational regulation. The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) sensing system is conserved in animals, but not in other organisms. However, bioinformatics imply that 2OG-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) homologous to...
Article
Full-text available
Water soluble quinones are a group of cytotoxic anti-bacterial compounds that are secreted by many species of plants, invertebrates, fungi and bacteria. Studies in a number of species have shown the importance of quinones in response to pathogenic bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas. Two electron reduction is an important mechanism of quinone detoxif...
Article
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Bacteria in the diverse P. fluorescens group include rhizosphere inhabitants known for their antifungal metabolite production and biological control of plant disease, such as Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, and mushroom pathogens such as Pseudomonas tolaasii. Here, we report that strain Pf-5 causes brown, sunken lesions on peeled caps of the button mus...
Article
Metal hyperaccumulation is an unusual trait involving the uptake and storage of high concentrations of metals in the aerial tissues of plants. A number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain the evolution of the metal hyperaccumulation trait, of which the hypothesis that accumulated metal provides a defence against herbivores or pathogens has...
Article
Full-text available
Metal hyperaccumulating plants are able to accumulate exceptionally high concentrations of metals, such as zinc, nickel, or cadmium, in their aerial tissues. These metals reach concentrations that would be toxic to most other plant species. This trait has evolved multiple times independently in the plant kingdom. Recent studies have provided new in...
Article
Full-text available
Plants naturally produce cyanide (CN) which is maintained at low levels in their cells by a process of rapid assimilation. However, high concentrations of environmental CN associated with activities such as industrial pollution are toxic to plants. There is thus an interest in increasing the CN detoxification capacity of plants as a potential route...
Article
The metal hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens is protected from disease by the accumulation of high concentrations of metals in its aerial tissues, which are toxic to many pathogens. As these metals can lead to the production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS), metal hyperaccumulator plants have developed highly effective ROS toleran...
Article
Full-text available
The bacteriovorous nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been used to investigate many aspects of animal biology, including interactions with pathogenic bacteria. However, studies examining C. elegans interactions with bacteria isolated from environments in which it is found naturally are relatively scarce. C. elegans is frequently associated with cu...
Article
CYP238A1, one of the two P450 enzymes in the genome of Pseudomonas putida KT2440, has been produced heterologously in Escherichia coli, purified, and found to bind acyclic and cyclic terpene alcohols such as farnesol, nerolidol, linalool, and terpineol. The other P450 enzyme in this organism (gene locus: PP1950) was also produced in E. coli but no...
Article
Antagonistic co-evolution between hosts and parasites (reciprocal selection for resistance and infectivity) is hypothesized to play an important role in host range expansion by selecting for novel infectivity alleles, but tests are lacking. Here, we determine whether experimental co-evolution between a bacterium (Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25) and...
Article
Full-text available
The finding that oxygenase-catalyzed protein hydroxylation regulates animal transcription raises questions as to whether the translation machinery and prokaryotic proteins are analogously modified. Escherichia coli ycfD is a growth-regulating 2-oxoglutarate oxygenase catalyzing arginyl hydroxylation of the ribosomal protein Rpl16. Human ycfD homolo...
Article
Metals play essential roles in many biological processes, but are toxic when present in excess. This makes their transport and homeostatic control of particular importance to living organisms. Within the context of plant-pathogen interactions the availability and toxicity of transition metals can have a substantial impact on disease development. Me...
Article
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a key feature of plant (and animal) defences against invading pathogens. As a result, plant pathogens must be able to either prevent their production or tolerate high concentrations of these highly reactive chemicals. In this review, we focus on plant pathogenic bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas and the ways in whi...