Gaelle Fehlmann

Gaelle Fehlmann
Max Planck Institute for Ornithology · Max Planck Institute for Ornithology (Radolfzell)

PhD

About

7
Publications
2,690
Reads
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248
Citations
Citations since 2017
5 Research Items
248 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
Additional affiliations
February 2018 - present
Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2018 - February 2018
Swansea University
Position
  • Consultant
October 2013 - October 2016
Swansea University
Position
  • Student demonstrator
Description
  • Practicals in evolutionary biology, collective behaviours, compared physiology and statistic

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
Full-text available
Humans have altered up to half of the world's land surface. Wildlife living within or close to these human-modified landscapes are presented with opportunities and risks associated with feeding on human-derived foods (e.g., agricultural crops and food waste). Understanding whether and how wildlife adapts to these landscapes is a major challenge, wi...
Article
The earliest studies of collective animal behaviour were inspired by and conducted in the wild. Over the past decades much of the research in this field has shifted to the laboratory, combining high-resolution tracking of individuals with mathematical simulations or agent-based models. Today we are beginning to see a 're-wilding' of collective beha...
Article
Full-text available
A range of species exploit anthropogenic food resources in behaviour known as 'raiding'. Such behavioural flexibility is considered a central component of a species' ability to cope with human-induced environmental changes. Here, we study the behavioural processes by which raiding male chacma baboons (Papio ursinus) exploit the opportunities and mi...
Article
Full-text available
Background The use of accelerometers in bio-logging devices has proved to be a powerful tool for the quantification of animal behaviour. While bio-logging techniques are being used on wide range of species, to date they have only been seldom used with non-human primates. This is likely due to three main factors: the long tradition of direct field o...
Article
Full-text available
Fehlmann and King introduce bio-logging techniques to track free-living animals.
Article
Growing human populations are increasingly competing with wildlife for limited resources and this can result in chronic human–wildlife conflict. In the Cape Peninsula, South Africa, chacma baboons Papio ursinus are habitual raiders of urban and rural areas, foraging on a variety of human-derived foods. Raiding behaviour is considered a threat to hu...

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