Gabriel Vasile

Gabriel Vasile
Romanian Academy · Institute of Archaeology "Vasile Pârvan"

Ph D; Researcher

About

42
Publications
6,412
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55
Citations
Citations since 2017
19 Research Items
21 Citations
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468
Introduction
Gabriel Vasile currently works at the Institute of Archaeology "Vasile Pârvan", Romanian Academy. Gabriel does research in Biological Anthropology, Medical Anthropology and Archaeology. Their current project is 'Noviodunum 2000'.
Additional affiliations
December 2014 - March 2020
Romanian Academy
Position
  • Researcher
March 2004 - November 2014
Muzeul Naţional de Istorie a României
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (42)
Chapter
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Article
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Abstract: The anthropological analysis of a skeletal sample (34 individuals from 29 burial graves) from the medieval cemetery at Dridu – La Metereze (12th–13th or 13th–14th centuries) determined the presence of 18 males, four females, and 12 whose sex is indeterminate (mostly children and adolescents). By age class, the highest mortality in subadul...
Article
Full-text available
Rescue archaeological excavations at Sisești Street, nos. 147–175 led to the identification and investigation of 29 archaeological features dated to the Bronze Age, the 9th and the 18th centuries. The paper discusses in detail the results of the research (archaeological materials and features) from an interdisciplinary perspective. It also raises t...
Article
Full-text available
Preventive archaeological research at the “ Dormition of the Virgin” – Strâmbeanu Church in Pitaru (dated to the 18th century) revealed, in addition to the archaeological material specific to the Middle Ages, the existence of seven inhumation tombs. The graves were identified in the narthex of the church. Most of them certainly belong to the Strâmb...
Article
Full-text available
The tell settlement from “Măgura Gumelnița” is the eponymous site of the Eneolithic civilization with the same name. It is probably the most significant tell settlement north of the Danube, and it belonged to the Kodjadermen ‐ Gumelnița ‐ Karanovo VI cultural complex that occupied the Balkan area in the second half of 5th millennium BC. During 2018...
Article
Full-text available
The existence of accounts about the tombs of the former political prisoners at Poarta Albă (Constanța County), led to the quest for a necropolis at the site known as Cimitirul Nou. Of the five individuals archaeologically investigated in 2017, one particularly attracted attention (the deceased''s bones had strong traces of burning, especially at th...
Article
Full-text available
Rezumat: Prezenta contribuție a fost prilejuită de cercetarea arheologică preventivă determinată de proiectul construirii sediului Poliției de Frontieră (în sectorul Isaccea). Acest proiect a afectat o suprafață de 6000 m 2 , dintr-un teren situat în zona de protecție a sitului arheologic "Cetatea Isaccea-Noviodunumˮ. Zona care a fost cercetată est...
Article
Full-text available
The tell settlement from “Măgura Gumelnița” is the eponymous site of the Eneolithic civilization with the same name. It is probably the biggest tell settlement North of the Danube, and it belonged to the Kodjadermen ‐ Gumelnița ‐ Karanovo VI civilization that occupied in the Balkan area in the second half of 5th millennium BC. In 2017, a complex in...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The relationship between the deposition of human bodies in the domestic space and the deposition of isolated human bones and body parts in different contexts is a characteristic of the Late Iron Age north to the Lower Danube. The diversity of deposition practice also appears in the case of the dog skeletons found in the settlements. In the present...
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper focuses on Eneolithic child burials discovered in the Sultana-Malu Roşu cemetery, southeastern Romania (c. 5000–4000 cal. BC). The associated burial practices may implicitly re ect, through the inclusion of grave goods or other features such as the treatment of the body and the position of the burial within the funerary area, the potenti...
Article
Full-text available
Cercetările de la Biserica Mare a Mănăstirii Hurezi au scos la iveală resturi osteologice ce provin de la patru indivizi : trei schelete aparținând unor bărbați (M1, M2 şi M3) descoperite cu prilejul desfacerii mormântului arhimandritului Ioan și un schelet de femeie, depus într- o criptă amenajată din cărămidă, aflată sub sarcofagul domnitorului C...
Article
Full-text available
The medieval site of Şibot (Alba County) was investigated in 2012 and consequently dated to the 15th century. The settlement was destroyed during the battle of Câmpul Pâinii (October 13, 1479). The present paper presents the results of the anthropological analysis of a burial within the Medieval settlement. The presented data contributes to a bette...
Poster
Full-text available
his paper focuses on the Eneolithic children burials discovered in the Sultana-Malu Rosu cemetery, Romania (ca. 5000-4000 cal BC). These burial practices may implicitly reflect, through grave goods or other features (such as body treatment and position within the funerary area), the potential symbolic significance of children and their connection t...
Poster
Full-text available
The Eneolithic necropolis from Sultana - Malu Roșu (Călărași county, Romania) contains 84 graves inhumations graves. Most graves contained individuals deposited in a crouched position on the left side, rarely on the right side, and the oriented eastwardly. However, beyond these findings, a number of graves from this cemetery, containing human bones...
Article
Full-text available
A new archaeological site was discovered in 2012 in Romania in the river Mureș Valley, at Tărtăria (Alba County). Researchers have been able to date it during the first period of the Iron Age (middle Hallstatt, Basarabi culture). Excavation has revealed a collective burial containing the remains of seven individuals (six of which were articulated a...
Article
Full-text available
In this article we will analyze several human remains from sites of Căscioarele-Ostrovel, Coşereni-Măgura de la Comana, Cuneşti-Măgura Cuneşti, Glina-La Nuci and Radovanu-La Muscalu, that assigned to Eneolithic sequence (Boian and Gumelniţa cultures). These bones come from a series of old excavations (1925-1982) and have been recently identified in...
Article
Full-text available
During the archaeological campaign of 2012 in the area of the Sultana-Ghețărie flat settlement, Mânăstirea commune, Călăraşi county, an inhumation grave belonging to the Gumelnița culture was discovered. The grave contained the skeleton in anatomical connection and moderate state of preservation, laid in a lateral foetal position, on the left side,...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Eneolithic cemetery of Sultana-Malu Roşu is located in the southeast of Romania, Sultana village, in the commune of Mânăstirea, Călăraşi County. From a cultural point of view it was used by two communities belonging to the Boian and the Gumelniţa cultures. Between 2006 and 2011 50 inhumation graves have been discovered there. Most of the graves...
Article
Full-text available
This article reviews the major contribution made by studies of physical anthropology to the development of a theory of human mortuary practice throughout time. We will briefly present the main directions of physical anthropology, grouped into specific trends developed by different schools over time. The knowledge gained, and the methods and techniq...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The Gumelnița site (known as “Măgura Gumelnița” or “Măgura Calomfirescu”) is probably the biggest tell settlement north of the Danube, and it belonged to the Kodjadermen‐Gumelnita‐Karanovo VI civilization that occupied the Balkan area in the second half of 5th millennium BC. The site is located in the northern area of the Balkan region, in the Southeast of Romania, on the left bank of Danube River. The purpose of this project is to contribute to the advancement of knowledge of the diets and economics of prehistoric populations, specifically the population of Gumelnița by means of stable isotopes (d13C, d15N, d2H, d18O).